What Is In Your Stove Right Now?

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I loaded up with oak this morning and got the first turn down, then forgot about it while making the kid breakfast. Once I realized it was cruising along at 900 STT. Whoops. Pretty easy to rectify thankfully. I just open the door for a couple minutes then run it fully shut down with the blower on high while it self regulates back to 700.

This happens once or twice a year. I usually like to sit with it while it settles, I even set an alarm on my phone for 10 min intervals if I'm super tired. It's very easy to get distracted.

Right now just some coals in there. It's 71 in here though so I'm likely just gonna let them go out and start over tonight.
 
Overnight load was more red oak, an ash or 2, couple of hickory, and a decent sized BL.
This is the main diet, for it is what is left. Only exception is a bit of maple with the better portion of it as sugar maple. This was the morning restart from coals and afternoon delight.

Scraping to finish the season. Hopefully, tomorrow and Tues work day will score more deadwood.
 
magnolia,now were just showing off
It’s not great firewood. Better than poplar. I’d rather burn it than rare its leaves but the flowers are pretty. Too warm today for dogwood so i purposefully skipped over that in my jumbled stacks. Equal opportunity scounger here.
 
We have an outside temp of 24.2 tonight, the forecast low from Accu is 13. The basement temp started out at 75, both living area temps are 71 with the sleeper at 69.

The overnight load in the wood stove is, four splits of beech, four splits of maple & two splits of ironwood.
 
mid-20F's outside this morning, and toasty on last night's two loads of 80% white oak and 20% hickory. The oak must've come out of some big rounds, as it's all split into squares and rectangles (no triangles). Damn stuff is so pretty, it almost feels a shame to be burning it. I'm pretty sure it came from a neighbor's lot, after a tornado ran thru his property in May 2019.
 
Been the same old song and dance here... Full load of ash mixed with cherry, sugar maple, honey locust and hickory for the overnight loads and a shoulder season load or two during the days depending on solar gains. Only used a little ironwood during that cold snap. Discovered someone didn't properly latch a window that was cracked for family Christmas which contributed to my difficulty heating during the cold snap.

Highs have been 40ish and lows 30ish. No problem keeping a decent house temperature now. Freezing frost advisory currently in effect.
 
Small load of slabwood (primarily oak) just to take the chill off. Going to be mid 40's today so probably will let it sit until tonight. Also, the grand baby has Pink Eye so I need to watch her as she can't go to daycare today. Going to have my hands full with that.
 
Gonna go out and survey the stacks and try to pull any funky, spalted or mushroomed splits, Don't want to carry them thru till next year so wanting to burn them before this season is over. Thinking about re organizing stack locations after this burn season. It's a bit Helter Skelter out there now.

Meanwhile burning oak and some mixed ? (not really sure) scrounged pieces.
Low 40's and Sunny out for back to back days this week.
 
We had 19.2 for a low this morning, the basement temp started out at 73, both temps in the living area were 69 with the sleeper at 68.

The first load in the wood stove has some yellow birch, ash & maple in it.
 
Quick load of oak this morning cruised at 600 STT. House went from 64 at 8am to 75 now. Letting it go to coals now. Going to 39 today.
 
Can anyone guess what my overnight load will be?
Yawn..... wish I had some birch, beech, iron wood, or ..... something different.
 
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We have an outside temp of 17.4 tonight with a forecast low of 12. The basement temp started out at 75, both temps in the living area are 70 with the sleeper at 68.

The overnight load has four splits of beech, three splits of ironwood & one split of sugar maple.
 
43F this morning according to Yahoo
woke at 0515 and found a few orange coals which meant I could coax the flue to draw
put on some oak and beech chip with my poplar starters bit by bit and now I've got a full load of ash+elm+elm+beech

I'll get it charred up and go back to bed for an hour or two

it's supposed to get into the 50s, but continuous rain for the week
so I'll keep burning if it gets too cool inside...60F in the salon is too cold...so if temp sits there too long, fire is sooooo much cheaper than elec
 
How are modern stoves dangerous?

Outside of the inherent "there's fire in the living room". They do everything older stoves used to do more efficiently with much less risk of a chimney fire.

eu stoves,i don't understand why drolet or some other large stove company doesn't take over the market
EcoDesign 2022 which is partly a labelling exercise and partly and edict outlining how household appliances will be designed and used from 2022 onward.

Essentially, in the UK and Europe, where solid fuel heaters are concerned: the gov'ts have stopped allowing new and future solid burning "appliances" to have large fire boxes. For example, Jotul larger fire box models are no longer available in France.

They want us to make a bed of coals and burn 2 splits which weigh less than 3Kg (~6.5lbs) in total. That's the total weight of the 2 splits, not each. And those splits shouldn't touch each other or the firebox. Keep that cycle going...not necessarily at all times...they want the appliances to "rest" as well. They don't instruct how long to rest. It's pretty much impossible in daily use. I was doing that pretty close to exactly as they want us too this past December, but it's so easy and better heat output and burn times to add more than 3Kg per load.

They don't want us sims filling up our fire boxes like you guys do in the Americas.

Along side of that, manufacturers are required to produce "appliances" which have a baseline high efficiency. Panadero is 77% (ish). I don't know what the actual numbers are...it's 0630 in the morning...What that means is air intake can be regulated by the user. And users can shut right down to smolder...which can easily lead to CO leaking back into the home via the air intake once the flue cools or imperfect door seals.

It is written in the owners manuals warning sections about slumbering dangers...and also outlined on the EcoDesign2022 site as I have posted here in this thread several times.

Further, manufacturers will boast very long burn times, but that is only possible on extended slumbering that won't be delivering much heat output. In actuality, users are instructed to refill the 2 splits every hour.

It has been a challenge. I've stopped doing a full slumber (air intake completely closed) and haven't had any more CO alarms. I also don't get the advertized 12 hr burn times.

My install is not good, with a horizontal first length of about 1 meter of flue pipe out the back of the stove, but many houses /conversions here like my house have a similar issue.
 
It’s not great firewood. Better than poplar. I’d rather burn it than rare its leaves but the flowers are pretty. Too warm today for dogwood so i purposefully skipped over that in my jumbled stacks. Equal opportunity scounger here.
the poplar species I have burns pretty well. Looking online I think it's Black Poplar. I mostly use it split very small for cold starts. This was a pretty big poplar very close to the back of my barn that was felled in 2016 that I'm still burning and still have a lot of. My MIL told me matchsticks are poplar, and lo and behold it does burn like matchsticks when dry. But a big split will burn a nice, long time.
 
the poplar species I have burns pretty well. Looking online I think it's Black Poplar. I mostly use it split very small for cold starts. This was a pretty big poplar very close to the back of my barn that was felled in 2016 that I'm still burning and still have a lot of. My MIL told me matchsticks are poplar, and lo and behold it does burn like matchsticks when dry. But a big split will burn a nice, long time.
Our poplar is tulip or yellow poplar. It’s in the magnolia family. Generally all other poplars are in a different family and more similar to a cottonwood.
 
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EcoDesign 2022 which is partly a labelling exercise and partly and edict outlining how household appliances will be designed and used from 2022 onward.

Essentially, in the UK and Europe, where solid fuel heaters are concerned: the gov'ts have stopped allowing new and future solid burning "appliances" to have large fire boxes. For example, Jotul larger fire box models are no longer available in France.

They want us to make a bed of coals and burn 2 splits which weigh less than 3Kg (~6.5lbs) in total. That's the total weight of the 2 splits, not each. And those splits shouldn't touch each other or the firebox. Keep that cycle going...not necessarily at all times...they want the appliances to "rest" as well. They don't instruct how long to rest. It's pretty much impossible in daily use. I was doing that pretty close to exactly as they want us too this past December, but it's so easy and better heat output and burn times to add more than 3Kg per load.

They don't want us sims filling up our fire boxes like you guys do in the Americas.

Along side of that, manufacturers are required to produce "appliances" which have a baseline high efficiency. Panadero is 77% (ish). I don't know what the actual numbers are...it's 0630 in the morning...What that means is air intake can be regulated by the user. And users can shut right down to smolder...which can easily lead to CO leaking back into the home via the air intake once the flue cools or imperfect door seals.

It is written in the owners manuals warning sections about slumbering dangers...and also outlined on the EcoDesign2022 site as I have posted here in this thread several times.

Further, manufacturers will boast very long burn times, but that is only possible on extended slumbering that won't be delivering much heat output. In actuality, users are instructed to refill the 2 splits every hour.

It has been a challenge. I've stopped doing a full slumber (air intake completely closed) and haven't had any more CO alarms. I also don't get the advertized 12 hr burn times.

My install is not good, with a horizontal first length of about 1 meter of flue pipe out the back of the stove, but many houses /conversions here like my house have a similar issue.
TLDR - modern "European" stoves have issues. That's very different than blanket saying modern stoves in general, especially on an American website. I realize I'm being a stickler but a lot of new people read these threads and we want to be accurate. Let's be careful with blanket statements.

Modern stoves here in the USA/Canada are not dangerous. Everyone should have a CO alarm, it's fire in your house, but they are safe appliances. High efficiency numbers are met but air isn't able to be completely closed in most (if not all) models. The EPA regulations have serious emission requirements and lots of stoves qualify for the tax credit being 75% efficient. Plenty of stoves are breathing very easy and always get a little bit of air. I get 6-8 hours on my stove from 2019 with only a 1.85 cu ft box. I can keep coals 12 hours.

Edit - You can't blame the stove because you have a bad installation. That is on the installer and user to get right. If you can't fix it and do it right then you shouldn't use it.
 
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Our poplar is tulip or yellow poplar. It’s in the magnolia family. Generally all other poplars are in a different family and more similar to a cottonwood.
I have tulip Poplar too. Pretty when if flowers
 
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