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  1. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    LI NY
    I think they will help my chimney heat up nicely before I start to rip roar it.

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  2. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Supercedars won't do much to truly heat your chimney. They'll provide just enough heat to get a little draft going, but it's the first small load of medium splits that really gets the chimney heated up.
  3. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    I will start with the pucks then add nice dry kindling to it. Wait a half an hour then add bigger pieces of wood. So that's my plan at least. Until I figure out with trial and error what works best with my stove.
  4. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    You got it, trial and error is the best teacher since you seem to have a good plan to start with. If things get sketchy, you know where to come.

    I believe the code that still works for supercedars is ( hearth13 ) for 10% off

    pen
  5. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    I got a really good price $35 total to my door for 48 of them.
    The only thing I am Afraid of is that my napoleon 1450 manual says not to use any wax fire starters.
    Now why would that be and will it cause or can it cause problems.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    You will be fine. Don't sweat it. I know that this has been a bit of a slog, but you are soon going to be a regular burner and all of this angst will start to fade as you get used to the routine.
    PapaDave likes this.
  7. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Is this what your manual said?

    If so, I'd say they were referring to things like these

    [​IMG]

    1/4 of a supercedar won't hurt a thing
  8. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Oh, Ok feel much better. I think once everything is up and running I will be at ease. Thanks again everyone for your help.
    pen likes this.
  9. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    You will. There will be a learning curve with operating the new stove, but that's normal.

    I'm not an installation expert, but I'm willing to bet that you'll be fine overall. The installation is unusual, but it seems to be within the guidelines of the manual and the overall length should overcome the offsets and horizontal run.

    Zero problem with the supercedar. It's just a bit of starter, not a whole log.
  10. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    I hope so, Do you think I should use a quarter piece of the superceder pucks to start a small Hot fire to cure the paint and firebrick for the first time. Or just use paper and nice kindling to do that. then wait until the Breaking in process is done to use the supersede pucks.
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Steel stoves don't need much break-in. You can do a few small fires with just some kindling and then let them die out to dry out the firebrick. After that, have at it. It'll take a 500-550F stove top temp fire to bake in the paint. This is best done on a day when you can have the windows open, preferably with a fan exhausting the fumes out of the room to the outdoors.
  12. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    I will try exactly that, One or two hot Kinlin fires and then you said let them die out completely and cool down.So the stove is cool and then do another one the same day or the next day.
  13. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    Most manufacturers recommend about three break-in fires. The object is to cure the paint which is has hi-temp resins that need to cure with high temps, and the bricks need to dry out. You will need a big enough fire to accomplish those temperatures of 500-550F at the stove top.

    Get a stove top thermometer like the Condor Inferno and a probe-type flue thermometer like the Condor FlueGuard. The first fire or two may seem pretty lame during that process, but they will get better. Don't be too surprised if you continue to smell the paint well into the burning season. I still smell it sometimes on hot fires. I think it's because the outside of the the double wall pipe never quite cures.
  14. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Wow that's funny, How long do i run it at 500-550 for. Also do you let it cool down completely before the next hot fire cure or not. Do I do 2-3 hot fires in one day or one a day until cured. Sorry for the dumb questions.
  15. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Can I get a stove top condor inferno only. Or should I get the condor flueguard too. I just didn't want to put a hole in my double insulated black pipe. I thought whatever the stove top temperature is the pipe should be half that is that true or not. But if it's better to have the flu temperature right I'll put one in.
  16. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Last edited: Sep 15, 2013
  17. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    There's no magic formula, but probably three separate fires is best. The main issue is that for the first few fires, there are unpleasant fumes being given off, so you'll want to do it when you can open the windows and run some fans and maybe put the pets in a room. You may still smell some fumes even after that, but it will get better.

    And yes, you don't have to have a flue thermometer. After a while, you may get curious about flue temps, then you can get one. It's actually an easy and non-destructive install. But I consider a stove top thermometer nearly mandatory, especially when you're just getting to know your stove.
  18. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    And when you do the first break-in fire I would recommend doing it while it is still "warm" enough outside that you can open a window. The curing paint certainly smells and it will be good to get some fresh air in.
  19. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Will do guys, I think I will run three separate fires about 500 to 550° for about 8 hours each one. I will let the stove cool down completely in between each fire. They say not to use water to wipe off finger prints off the stove that were from the install. Should I use just a dry cloth or something. So there's no marks left in the paint with the curing process.
  20. bag of hammers

    bag of hammers Minister of Fire

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    Hi Treemoss - sorry if I missed this or if it's been covered - does the stove manual not talk about first burn-in fires (duration, intensity)? The manual for my stove was very specific on this. Very short, 'warm" fire, then cool down, then 2nd (longer hotter) fire, then cool down, then normal operation. Not suggesting this applies to the Napolean, but 8 hours @ 550 seems a bit hard on the first burn...?
  21. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    I called napoleon and they said to run 4 to 5 brake in burns of 8 hrs each at 500 to 550. Not sure tho if he really knew Or that was his own Suggestion.

    The manual said

    The first fire(s) in your appliance will be difficult to get going and keep going with little amount of heat being generated. This is a result of the moisture being driven out of the fire brick. Allow 30 to 40 hours of hot fires (temperatures in excess of 500°F - 600°F) before your appliance will perform normally. During the break-in period (the first 2 or 3 fires) create only small, hot fires using kindling; this will allow the firebrick to cure. Do not be alarmed if small hairline cracks develop in the firebrick. This is a normal occurrence and does not pose a safety hazard. The paint may also smell a little for the first few fires as it cures and you may wish to open a door or window to alleviate the smell.

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