Blaze king - king install in progress.

snaple4

Feeling the Heat
Dec 18, 2017
265
AR
I ran a 6” OAK to my wood stove then reduced down to a 3... But my install is weird and I already had 6”pipe from work. Keep an eye the pipe if you don’t insulate it. Install looks great so far. I don’t like the look of the built in corner stuff that you had there
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
Much better location for the F/A. Tile looks great! How much beer did it take to get the tile installed?
 

Dustin

Minister of Fire
Sep 3, 2008
556
Western Oregon
Much better location for the F/A. Tile looks great! How much beer did it take to get the tile installed?
zero :( I was on call all dang weekend. First ever beer free home project. There were no injuries to report and limited flame outs and or tools being launched across the yard in anger.
 

Dustin

Minister of Fire
Sep 3, 2008
556
Western Oregon
What's the outlet up in the top row of wall tile for?
It’s randomly there from the old gas stove mantel. I bought a black outlet to match the tile.. might leave it, might cap the wires and do a black face plate, might put a mantel there later... not sure!
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,131
07462
It’s randomly there from the old gas stove mantel. I bought a black outlet to match the tile.. might leave it, might cap the wires and do a black face plate, might put a mantel there later... not sure!
A small sconce light would be nice, sometimes before bed I go down to check my BK's settings, having a low light helps see the t-stat setting & whether the active needle is where you want it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BKVP

BKVP

Minister of Fire
Well done!! Looks great. How did you move the stove into position without damaging the tiles? I ask because I too have been working on an elevated hearth. Mine will have a KE40 sometime later this week.
 

Dustin

Minister of Fire
Sep 3, 2008
556
Western Oregon
Well done!! Looks great. How did you move the stove into position without damaging the tiles? I ask because I too have been working on an elevated hearth. Mine will have a KE40 sometime later this week.
the installers used a hand truck. They must have done this before. They pulled the hand truck on to the hearth itself and dropped that bad boy almost in the perfect spot. Then only had to slide her maybe half an inch to get it dead center.

chimney going up now. More pics to come!
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
the installers used a hand truck. They must have done this before. They pulled the hand truck on to the hearth itself and dropped that bad boy almost in the perfect spot. Then only had to slide her maybe half an inch to get it dead center.

chimney going up now. More pics to come!
Send them to Walla Walla!
 

Dustin

Minister of Fire
Sep 3, 2008
556
Western Oregon
She’s in, kinda! The inside double wall pipe that the installers ordered turned out to be just a little bit too long. Having to order a shorter section to make it all work.

I don’t have an ash pan, and I’m guessing that’s not standard. Is this something I can order after market on the KE40 if I want one?

Also, here’s some pics! They did a good job.

1FD28507-071E-4E99-A958-224140661275.jpeg B7199E85-410D-41CC-963E-482F3F1256C5.jpeg AB0338B1-60A0-4064-98E1-EB13604E7AB6.jpeg
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
She’s in, kinda! The inside double wall pipe that the installers ordered turned out to be just a little bit too long. Having to order a shorter section to make it all work.

I don’t have an ash pan, and I’m guessing that’s not standard. Is this something I can order after market on the KE40 if I want one?

Also, here’s some pics! They did a good job.

View attachment 263184
View attachment 263185 View attachment 263186
Ask the guys to use a slip joint. That will allow you to slide the pipe up and place bag under the pipe when cleaning. Very, very handy. And it's adjustable! You can add the ash pan later, yes. If you have time later this week send me an email to discuss what is involved with the ash pans......
 

Dustin

Minister of Fire
Sep 3, 2008
556
Western Oregon
Ask the guys to use a slip joint. That will allow you to slide the pipe up and place bag under the pipe when cleaning. Very, very handy. And it's adjustable! You can add the ash pan later, yes. If you have time later this week send me an email to discuss what is involved with the ash pans......
thanks!! This thing is a monster...
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,647
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Careful not to scratch the top with that poker! Totally aesthetic but they could have used a single length of chimney up on top instead of the two little ones. How tall overall from stove top to cap?

I like how that wood tile back wall turned out.
 

Dustin

Minister of Fire
Sep 3, 2008
556
Western Oregon
Careful not to scratch the top with that poker! Totally aesthetic but they could have used a single length of chimney up on top instead of the two little ones. How tall overall from stove top to cap?

I like how that wood tile back wall turned out.
thats a good question. Not sure why it went that way. The installer did mention I can twist off the two smaller sections on the roof to make cleaning easier. When standing at the chimney on the roofer it’s taller than I am (6 foot).

I’ll have to bust out the tape measure to see overall length. Now you got me curious
 

Dustin

Minister of Fire
Sep 3, 2008
556
Western Oregon
Careful not to scratch the top with that poker! Totally aesthetic but they could have used a single length of chimney up on top instead of the two little ones. How tall overall from stove top to cap?

I like how that wood tile back wall turned out.
19 feet from cap to stovetop. I have a plastic bag over the bottom of the chimney at the moment while I wait for the rest of the parts. It’s trying to take the bag up the chimney a little. Good sign!
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,647
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
19 feet from cap to stovetop. I have a plastic bag over the bottom of the chimney at the moment while I wait for the rest of the parts. It’s trying to take the bag up the chimney a little. Good sign!
Nice! 19 feet of vertical stack provide plenty of draft strength to allow you to really use that low end. Those of us with shorter stacks have to keep the stove a little hotter to maintain sufficient flue temps for enough draft strength.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,131
07462
Agree, a telescoping section of dvl pipe is the way to go here
 

Dustin

Minister of Fire
Sep 3, 2008
556
Western Oregon
Nice! 19 feet of vertical stack provide plenty of draft strength to allow you to really use that low end. Those of us with shorter stacks have to keep the stove a little hotter to maintain sufficient flue temps for enough draft strength.
Thanks!! Maybe I should be posting this in the everything BK thread but...

Do I have to worry about an overfire with this stove? I’ve ran secondary combustion stoves for over 13 years with long chimneys. Loading them to the gills always scared the hell out of me. More often than not, with a full load of dry wood and the secondaries firing, the stove would go nuclear. This even happened when I would turn the air down early.

So, I’m really used to playing around with the air controls to keep myself away from an over fire on a full load. I’m reading my KE40 manual and it basically says, load it up, close the door, let it rip for 30 minutes. After you set your thermostat, don’t worry about it. The stove won’t let it overfire.

is it REALLY that good?

I’m not worried about it for me more or less, but my biggest fear is wife running the thing and going into melt down mode. I always tried to teach her the exact right time to step the air control down before passing the point of no return.

if you haven’t noticed by my long winded post, yes, I am sitting on the couch with some makers mark staring at this work of art sitting cold in the corner.

oh here’s a pic:

image.jpg
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,647
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Thanks!! Maybe I should be posting this in the everything BK thread but...

Do I have to worry about an overfire with this stove? I’ve ran secondary combustion stoves for over 13 years with long chimneys. Loading them to the gills always scared the hell out of me. More often than not, with a full load of dry wood and the secondaries firing, the stove would go nuclear. This even happened when I would turn the air down early.

So, I’m really used to playing around with the air controls to keep myself away from an over fire on a full load. I’m reading my KE40 manual and it basically says, load it up, close the door, let it rip for 30 minutes. After you set your thermostat, don’t worry about it. The stove won’t let it overfire.

is it REALLY that good?

I’m not worried about it for me more or less, but my biggest fear is wife running the thing and going into melt down mode. I always tried to teach her the exact right time to step the air control down before passing the point of no return.

if you haven’t noticed by my long winded post, yes, I am sitting on the couch with some makers mark staring at this work of art sitting cold in the corner.

oh here’s a pic:

View attachment 263229
It’s really that good. These stoves don’t run away. I too had the frantic call at work from the wife with an 800 degree Lopi noncat despite the intake closed fully. The thermostat works great, like many I don’t wait 30 minutes burning in a new load on high as that is too long with our Doug fir. 15 minutes or so is plenty. Then swing down the stat to your known setting and you can actually watch the thermostat modulate the fire to maintain the desired firebox temperature. It’s pretty cool. The wife is very comfortable with the steady controlled output instead of the peakiness we had with noncats.

The trick is getting her to engage the cat at the right time. Seems simple and it is but if you’re not familiar with the engagement process it can feel complicated.

Are you getting a flue probe meter installed? I find it very useful.
 

Dustin

Minister of Fire
Sep 3, 2008
556
Western Oregon
It’s really that good. These stoves don’t run away. I too had the frantic call at work from the wife with an 800 degree Lopi noncat despite the intake closed fully. The thermostat works great, like many I don’t wait 30 minutes burning in a new load on high as that is too long with our Doug fir. 15 minutes or so is plenty. Then swing down the stat to your known setting and you can actually watch the thermostat modulate the fire to maintain the desired firebox temperature. It’s pretty cool. The wife is very comfortable with the steady controlled output instead of the peakiness we had with noncats.

The trick is getting her to engage the cat at the right time. Seems simple and it is but if you’re not familiar with the engagement process it can feel complicated.

Are you getting a flue probe meter installed? I find it very useful.
I hadn’t really planned on the flue probe. Might not be a bad idea? Sometimes with too many thermos I find myself being a little OCD about it. I was wondering if I would be fine just focusing on the cat probe temp, knowing if it’s in active, the flue is fine?
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,131
07462
So when the installers come back to finish the rest of the interior chimney pipe ask them if the have a meter to measure draft, also like @Highbeam a flue probe is a great tool and one should be ordered for your setup, anyway if they have a meter to measure draft you'll want them to come back after the break in fires have been completed and when its colder outside.
With the meter they will need to drill a hole into the black pipe, 18" above the flue collar is fine (hole then can be used for the flue probe, yes the old kill two birds with one stone)
Build a fully loaded fire, once the fire is established close the by-pass, keep the air setting to the max and take the draft measurement, you should be seeing a reading less the .05" water column, this will establish that your within factory build spec for your setup.
Once you established that your within factory spec all the trust is on the t-stat air control, basically like that qvc oven, you set it and forget it, hard to believe, but really.
Some people may think having that the draft tested is a unnecessary thing to do unless your seeing an issue, I struggled my first season trying to figure out if I was running my stove in its most optimum setup or not, I was having a few issues with setting my t-stat and the fire load stalling, or setting it to high and not having the stove click over and burning through loads within 10-12 hours. Turns out my draft was crazy high, like it would literally suck the hot air out of the fire box (stalling low burns, and really ripping through burns at higher settings) had to install a chimney pipe damper and now I'm back in happy BK land. And for those that dont understand how high my draft was, put it to you this way, when I'd have a higher setting fire and opened the by-pass, I would get a whistling noise coming from the cat probe hole if I removed the probe, it was rough.