Considerations for moving splitter to outside storage?

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wahoowad

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2005
1,664
Virginia
I’ve been fortunate that I had space to store my electric 220v Ramsplitter inside my garage since I bought it new 8 years ago. But I now need the garage space and will have to store it outside. I plan to build a lean-to off the side of a small shed that will cover it from direct rain and sun exposure, although the shed is small so the lean-to won’t afford as much protection as say a larger one on a larger shed/barn. So while I plan to go ahead and do this I’m worried the splitter will begin to degrade from rust, exposure and perhaps critters gnawing on hoses.

Anybody been through this and have any helpful hints?
 

wahoowad

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2005
1,664
Virginia
For what it's worth here's the back side of the shed where I'll make the lean-to. Not ideal as the ground is sloping away but should suffice.

IMG-0353.jpg
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,813
Northern Canada
Both my splitters live outside under an overhang
I use my gas one every year,haven't used the electric one since i bought it at a garage sale.It was going inside to split the occasional large split,but so far hasn't been needed.
 

hedge wood

Feeling the Heat
Mar 1, 2009
302
Eastern NE
My main homemade wood splitter lived in a open front cattle shed for well over twenty years. Never any issues with it. A few years ago I put a 40X100 pole shed on that farm so the splitter is in that building now.
 

Mutineer

Burning Hunk
Dec 13, 2018
155
NE Ohio
My splitter has lived outside for 30+ years with only one of the plastic storage totes covering the engine (most of the time), and I only replaced the hoses last year due to cracking on the sheathing. Never had an issue with any of the components except the Briggs engine I wore out after about 8 years because, well, those are pieces of you-know-what compared to the Honda GX series engines I've used ever since. Even changed the hydro fluid 3-4 years ago.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,576
Philadelphia
My splitter lives outside under a cover. No issues, other than a bit of mud spatter under it, picked up from splash-back in heavy rains. Same thing I see on my barn doors and siding. To look at my splitter, you'd think it was kept indoors, it's probably coming up on 10 years old.

The only downside is that I do have to buy a new cover every third'ish year, and alter it with my own grommets and bungees to stay in place thru our heavy storms and occasional hurricanes. Also, I can't throw the cover back over a hot splitter, so I need to remember to walk back down to the wood lot and cover the thing an hour after shutting down for the day.
 

wahoowad

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2005
1,664
Virginia
Is this a cover made for your model splitter or a generic cover that might fit mine?
 

Mutineer

Burning Hunk
Dec 13, 2018
155
NE Ohio
I buy a cheap plastic tote at Wal Mart or the like, throw away the lid and cut a slot in the side to fit over the drive shaft end of the engine. I replace them every 3-4 years after the UV rays break the plastic down, or a buddy borrows the splitter and like Ashful warned above, he put it on a hot muffler and melted it.

DSCN2199.JPG
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,576
Philadelphia
Is this a cover made for your model splitter or a generic cover that might fit mine?
I checked my Amazon order history, and it appears they last 6 years, unless you put them on a hot muffler. DAMHIKT

Ignore the photo, it covers my entire 22-ton Huskee splitter, including the hitch tongue and the tops of the tires. With the aforementioned added grommets and bungee, it covers the bearing caps and top half of each tire, keeping UV off the tire rubber.

Amazon product
 

vbu

Member
Mar 3, 2019
91
MS
Do yourself a favor and buy a roll of Denso tape, and wrap it around all hydraulic fittings. I used to work on ships, and this stuff worked great to keep the seawater from getting to all the fittings and prevented rust.
 
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Max W

Member
Feb 4, 2021
109
Maine
My self built electric splitter has lived under a tarp for the last 15 years or so with the motor covered with a plastic bin. While it works fine and the hoses are still good it shows, especially parts of the cut down boat trailer that are uncovered. Any shed open or otherwise would be an improvement
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,576
Philadelphia
Do yourself a favor and buy a roll of Denso tape, and wrap it around all hydraulic fittings. I used to work on ships, and this stuff worked great to keep the seawater from getting to all the fittings and prevented rust.
Amazing product, but completely overkill for this application. If he keeps a it covered, there's no need to deal with petrolatum tapes.