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Smackcat

New Member
Feb 5, 2021
10
Minnesota
Good day everyone,
This is my second season of using my Drolet Heat Commander. I had a two story home with the unit in the basement (obviously), so, 3 levels all together. I am starting to think I am over-drafting as I rarely get good secondary burns out of the unit. The baffles are pushed all the way to the back of the unit as should be. It seems more often than not, the flames seem to be "rushing" towards the front of the unit going up and out towards the heat exchangers... rarely is it a slow-motion "dancing" fire. The wood is seasoned oak, in between 8-15 M.C. It's about two years old, split. However, I pack the furnace tight with wood and usually only have to feed it once in the morning and once at night when its anywhere from 20* to -15* or so. Then, it usually will take a little more when it gets cooler. As is, the unit has no problem heating my home... but as us nerds would probably all agree, why not have it better and more efficient, if its possible!!! I have the thermostat set to 72* usually. The house was built in '83 with windows already replaced prior to me moving in, triple-pane Anderson's . I have purchased a Dwyer Mark II and a 6" stove pipe butterfly-style damper. Due to my setup, I cannot run a barometric damper due to not having a vertical connector pipe to my chimney. From my understanding, the the Dwyer should read in between .04-.06, for optimum burning efficiency? Correct me if I'm wrong (which, if you ask my wife, it's quite often)!!!!

So, now I ask you fine gentleman. According to my picture, where is the best place to install the Dwyer unit to measure the M.C. / draft and where would the best place be to install the stove pipe damper? Also, are there any major concerns about the butterfly-style stove pipe damper you guys see with this idea (considering different burn stages / wind speeds atop the chimney) if I am unable to constantly be right next to the unit to monitor the draft according to what the Dwyer is reading!? I am just curious and eager if I could dial this in a little better to best utilize the technology at my fingertips. I understand it will inherently open the possibility of more creosote buildup and formation. That I understand. I sweep my chimney monthly, so I'm not all too concerned about that becoming a major issue for me.

And lastly, from what I understand, the secondary air tubes atop the Heat Commander furnace are always feeding O2 into the unit, correct?! Those aren't controlled via electronic damper doors dictating how much air is getting sent through them??

In the picture, I have labeled the three sections of stove pipe with "A, "B" and "C". I am open for all help in where it would be recommended to install the Dwyer and 6" butterfly damper.

In advance, thank you all, GOD bless and keep on burnin'! :)
 

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A baro is the only way to get your draft in check without constant babysitting. It doesn't need to be in a vertical run. It has a collar so you can rotate to make it level no matter the orientation of the stove pipe. Put it in "B" and you'll be drafting correctly and sipping Crown in no time...
 
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The HC and the Caddy are the same firefox design, this thread has lots of info on why you might not be getting a good secondary burn. What's the MC on a freshly split piece of wood ?

That's a good PDF, I hope your basement looks like that. ;lolPersonally, I'd drill a hole into A for the manometer ( I used a 3/8 flexible copper line and them put the plastic pipe from my manometer into that ), and then put the barometric damper on B preferably, C would work too. I'm not sure how far apart you want them, I'd say the closer the better. I'd pass on the key damper if you are going to install a barometric damper.

EDIT: I missed that you are going in a masonary chimney. You might want to drop a 6"insulated liner down that chimney. That wil help tremendously with your how your furnace burns.
 
In the picture, I have labeled the three sections of stove pipe with "A, "B" and "C". I am open for all help in where it would be recommended to install the Dwyer and 6" butterfly damper.
Manometer hole can go in A, B, or C...the barometric damper needs to go in B, or C.
 
The HC has a fixed opening at the rear center between primary and grate dampers. This opening is for secondary air. Once both primary and grate dampers close the only (with exception to the small opening under door) place for air to enter the firebox is the secondary opening.

Are you using single wall or double wall pipe from HC to masonry chimney? Does your thermostat ever get satisfied? When it is satisfied you should hear the primary air damper motor slowly close while ther HC goes into energy saving mode. The fire should get lazy if your draft is correct.

Eric
 
Manometer hole can go in A, B, or C...the barometric damper needs to go in B, or C.
A baro damper can go in a pipe that isn't perfectly vertical or horizontal, in this case, section "B" of my stove pipe!? As long as the damper itself flaps up and down level and not crooked, correct!? (Hinges for the damper need to be at the 3 and 9 o'clock position)?? Right!?
 
A baro damper can go in a pipe that isn't perfectly vertical or horizontal, in this case, section "B" of my stove pipe!? As long as the damper itself flaps up and down level and not crooked, correct!? (Hinges for the damper need to be at the 3 and 9 o'clock position)?? Right!?
Correct.