econoburn leaking

Mauler Posted By Mauler, Apr 3, 2017 at 2:11 PM

  1. maple1

    maple1
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    I don't think I have ever really heard for sure of a closed pressurized boiler, corroding through like this from water issues. My old one looked brand new inside after 20 years, when it was originally filled with well water that is generally high in iron & manganese, and a little bit low in PH. Actually, it looked better than new inside, it had a thin coating of black stuff all over that seemed as if it was offering protection - looked like flat black paint. If air was regularly getting in somehow, that might change the water on the beans. Or, if there were naturally occuring salts or something like that in it.

    Really curious as to what happened here - not sure if we will ever know though. I'm pretty sure I wouldn't pay those quoted freight charges, but I might load it up & make the drive myself if I were the OP.

    Wonder if the return protection pump stuff if installed was actually working right? Although I know nothing about Econoburns & their setup for that or how its controlled. If the pump wasn't pumping when it was supposed to be, that wouldn't help, creosote & corrosion-wise. Might also set up for improper flow inside the boiler & possible hotspots/cavitation inside?
     
  2. mark cline

    mark cline
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    Dec 20, 2012
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    When I finally fill my 300K Econoburn boiler and put it into service , water testing will be done and maintained. To prevent creosote from attacking the upper firebox , maintaining a proper water protection loop of at least 140F or higher will reduce the chance of acidic creosote corroding from the outside in . Storage will be 1500 gal pressurized to prevent idling ,which is the largest contributor of creosote formation.
     
    Chris Hoskin likes this.
  3. Fred61

    Fred61
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    Everyone's needs are different from one another but in my case I feed the zones directly from storage. During the daily firing the boiler may see return temperatures below 140 but not for long since storage temperature is usually around 130 to 140 at the time of firing. On the other hand from the description of the install, the OP is experiencing a large heating load and in ground losses and it is likely that the return to the boiler might be consistently below 140::F.If return protection failed it would not take long to eat up the firebox.

    If the boiler was filled upon installation and little has been added over the course of use, I find it hard to believe that the water was acidic enough to eat through the walls. It would eventually neutralize itself, form oxide then convert to that black stuff that Maple1 referred to and coat the surfaces. Yes, it is mother natures protection plating process. It's cooked rust!

    I stand by my original claim that there was condensation within the firebox and it eroded the walls to a point where they became thin as paper. I would like to see a post mortem of the steel and compare the thickness to the original material.
     
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  4. mark cline

    mark cline
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    I totally agree, the ideal setup would be storage, water treatment and a working cold water protection loop.
     
  5. Mauler

    Mauler
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    Jun 19, 2008
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    I recently shipped it back and they replied that they are fixing the leaks. If the walls are paper thin as some on here suggest, then I suppose I am stuck with the prospect of developing new leaks in the near future?
     
  6. Fred61

    Fred61
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    Not necessarily. If they re-panel the firebox walls, which would be the best way to seal multiple leaks, you will end up with the same thickness as when new.

    Sent from my SM-G900R4 using Tapatalk
     
  7. Fred61

    Fred61
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    Not necessarily. If they re-panel the firebox walls, which is the best way to seal multiple leaks, the thickness will be the same as new

    Sent from my SM-G900R4 using Tapatalk
     
  8. mark cline

    mark cline
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    Keep us informed as to the final outcome. Pictures would be great, Dale and the crew at Econoburn will get it back in shape.
     
  9. maple1

    maple1
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    As mentioned, depends on the nature of the repair - I would ask that, I think. But seems to me just replacing the whole firebox would be easier for them than patching holes. Did they give suggestions for why it happened or how to prevent it again?
     
  10. Mauler

    Mauler
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    that would be a huge relief, thanks
     
  11. leon

    leon
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    Its too bad that these manufacturers will not/refuse to wake up and understand that firebrick the best way to solve most of their internally created problems by lining the fireboxes with firebrick by protecting the firebox and by increasing the burning temperature and reducing the smoke emissions.

    Any boiler mechanic that works in a power plant will tell you you need firebrick in a firebox.
     
  12. Herm

    Herm
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  13. hondaracer2oo4

    hondaracer2oo4
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    I don't think that they want hotter temps in the upper chamber of gassers. The problems inside result from hot and cold spots( not enough flow in the jacket to mix it).

    Woodmaster clean fire with the dry firebox is interesting.
     
  14. Karl_northwind

    Karl_northwind
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    I'm With Fred61. I have an EBW-150 in my shop that has had the same thing happen after 7 years. it was in an application with no return protection, doing in floor heat. I bought it for scrap price when i sold the owner a G-100 which has been working great. I still haven't decided what I'm doing with it, repair and run unpressurized till something further craps out, float brass over the thin spots (which is sounding pretty good) or what.

    classic return protection issue.
     
  15. hondaracer2oo4

    hondaracer2oo4
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    What kind of return temps was the boiler seeing? Did you add return protection for the g100?
     
  16. Fred61

    Fred61
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    The only easy firebox wall to replace is the back wall and then it would help if the welder didn't have any shoulders. I think I would go in through the top of the vessel and work my way back.

    But then if the boiler return tapping was in the rear of the unit it is possible that the rear panel is the only one that's thin and porous from the condensation in the firebox.
     

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