Fisher blower

Drumguy460

New Member
Jan 22, 2020
6
Falls, Pennsylvania
Hey guys just joined the group! I’m currently running a fisher insert as a freestanding unit. It works “ok” but without a blower I know it’s not nearly running to its potential. After some searching in the forums I saw the resident fisher expert Coaly recommended this fasco blower setup. Amazon product
Hopefully this will push the heat out of the old pig!! Btw Coaly If you read this, I live about 10 miles from the original fisher place in Factoryville!!
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
3,753
NE PA
Welcome to the Forum!
Here's a good thread that shows all the Insert blowers. I'm still partial to the mail box!
made-a-blower-for-my-fisher-insert.117672

The building is still under the same ownership as it was when it was rented as the Fisher Showroom.
The guy renting the last time I was there winters in Florida and was running a bait and tackle shop. I'm an hour south.
 

Todd67

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2012
917
Northern NY
Welcome to the forum! You've landed on a treasure trove of Fisher stove information:)
 

Drumguy460

New Member
Jan 22, 2020
6
Falls, Pennsylvania
Last night I found the original fire screen insert for it too!! I just got my blower fan, sorry that link got screwed up when I posted. It’s a fasco A212 setup. Coaly, I believe you’re the one who suggested it, looks like it’ll work well. Gonna make up a couple L shaped brackets to hang it on the ash lip. Thanks for all you’re help
 

Drumguy460

New Member
Jan 22, 2020
6
Falls, Pennsylvania
Well got the blower installed and it really cranks the heat out now!! BUT my chimney temps are going way to high!! I’m gonna let it burn out. I’m thinking it’s getting air into the chimney pipe somehow.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
3,753
NE PA
If the right door is latched in the picture, the right door handle latch needs adjusting. It may or may not be pulling the doors tight.
Heat the bend in the latch rod on the inside of the door if you have a torch. Propane works, but takes a while to get hot enough. It needs to be bent at a sharper angle, more like 90* since someone has been leaning on the handle to close it too tight. That tends to straighten the bend. Both handles should match the same angle when latched.
Do not be tempted to ben dit cold. It's not difficult to bend, but when heated by normal heat from stove it will go right back where it was. Get it a dull red, bend and it will stay there. I use an adjustable wrench to bend them.

If you burn it with screen in place, it will burn fast and hot. The only control with open door burning is the flue damper.
With established fire, close flue damper slowly until smoke forms and starts to roll in at top. Open damper slightly to allow evacuation of smoke.
This setting will slow the draft, keeping a little heat from escaping and slow the fire without smoke coming in. (with a correct chimney)They are not considered a radiant heater in Fireplace Mode with doors open. The chimney will get much hotter.

What temp is the chimney running?
Where are you measuring it?
What is the chimney height and diameter?
Are you using the flue damper on the Insert, or a damper in the pipe?

Air leaking into the chimney from anywhere will cool it, decreasing draft, slowing the burn. Not make it hotter.

Make sure it goes out or glows with little to no flame with air intakes closed fully. If it continues to burn hot, the door seal is leaking. Make sure the back of doors are clean and the channel iron door seal is clean.
 
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Drumguy460

New Member
Jan 22, 2020
6
Falls, Pennsylvania
Thanks for your response. It burns good without the blower on, I’ve been using it about 2 months steady now. It’s a 6 inch pipe going into the terra-cotta chimney. Total height I’d say is 30’. Gets great draft. I can open the draft knobs with the fire out and blow smoke towards the doors and watch it suck in. I’m running the factory flu damper. My problem I’m thinking with the blower is that where the pipe comes through the heat jacket is letting air from the blower rush into the firebox and basically ramping it up like that. Lie I said, no problems at all without the blower on. Measured temps about two foot up on the chimney pipe, got up to about 500 when I decided Something wasn’t right.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
3,753
NE PA
So you think you have the positive pressure in the plenum leaking into the firebox. Hm, that makes it a supercharged stove. :)

What that does is forces oxygen into the stove collar, and with oxygen at the hottest area, the smoke can ignite with a secondary combustion type burn in the exhaust. Flue temps skyrocket igniting any creosote build up. The pipe can glow where it ignites. A very poorly fitting connector pipe on a stove will leak air in and combust in the pipe, glowing right above the leak.
A baffle inside may be enough to make it go away. It reduces smoke so you don't have much smoke to ignite outside of the firebox an dit decreases exhaust temperature making it much more controllable.
I'd look for cracks around the vent pipe where it is welded to the firebox. If it ignites there, it will be super clean.
 

Drumguy460

New Member
Jan 22, 2020
6
Falls, Pennsylvania
So you think you have the positive pressure in the plenum leaking into the firebox. Hm, that makes it a supercharged stove. :)

What that does is forces oxygen into the stove collar, and with oxygen at the hottest area, the smoke can ignite with a secondary combustion type burn in the exhaust. Flue temps skyrocket igniting any creosote build up. The pipe can glow where it ignites. A very poorly fitting connector pipe on a stove will leak air in and combust in the pipe, glowing right above the leak.
A baffle inside may be enough to make it go away. It reduces smoke so you don't have much smoke to ignite outside of the firebox an dit decreases exhaust temperature making it much more controllable.
I'd look for cracks around the vent pipe where it is welded to the firebox. If it ignites there, it will be super clean.
Well, today I took the stove pipe off and put a shop light over the top of the connector. It worked perfect to show any leak spots between the heat jacket and stove. I used to high temp black stove cement and filled the hairline spots I saw around the inside by the flue damper. Now she’s working great! Side question for you, that factory damper is still installed, do you think an in pipe damper would work better for me as this factory one is only covering maybe 3/4 pipe when closed? I have a baffle plate made from work out of 1/4 steel plate but I honestly didn’t notice much difference with it in, plus it cut down on my load volume. Thanks for you help buddy you’re my go to guy with fisher stuff!
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
3,753
NE PA
You should not have to close the damper more than half way. It is a variable resistance to control an over drafting chimney. The flue damper is a chimney control that slows velocity of rising gasses. It doesn't matter where it is, like a restricting valve in a water line, it controls the flow no matter where it is. Slowing the rising gasses decreases draft, decreasing what comes in. So it controls the chimney, which affects the stove. If you have the correct draft, a baffle becomes a resistance inside the firebox, decreasing the amount you need to use the flue damper, if at all.
Are you using a temperature gauge on the pipe? Do you have a known pipe temp where it dumps into chimney? (while smoke is present)

The baffle should set on the rear brick retainers and rise towards the front with a square inch opening to match the square inch area of pipe and chimney flue. It will make it much more controllable with higher heat towards the front than the exhaust. That's the reason for the cracks around exhaust. The baffle allows more smoke particles to be burned in the firebox, raising the temperature with less wood, so the slight decrease in firebox area is not an issue. Any wood piled up to the exhaust vent is mostly loss, you don't want it there. The baffle size and angle is critical and designed for the chimney, not the stove.
Was it made for the chimney you're using?

Copy of Insert drawing with baffle.jpg

The white areas show the hot areas on this Papa Bear. The white area around the exhaust is what you want to prevent. This one had no damage other than paint discoloration.

Hot Papa Spokane Wash..jpg Hot Papa Spokane Wash. 3.jpg

This is where they crack from fatigue getting too hot;

118416-de1fafaee9acf75d931bb258a0f404dc.jpg 118415-d6f605387d69c5cb4b87a93676a2e84a.jpg
That can be prevented with a baffle. You want to keep the intense heat away from your stove cement repair.