Found an Insert WTB Fisher Wood Stove Insert Glass

AeroScout

New Member
Jan 6, 2021
16
Texas
Hello,

I am a new user and just bought a Fisher Insert. It is all there but the glass is gone and has been replaced with sheet metal. I would like to replace it with OEM panes if anyone has a couple laying around.


I have been reading like crazy on this forum and have got the Fisher bug. Kind of cool being from Oregon (my brother lives in Eugene) and I find a Fisher stove all the way down here in TX.

I have 4 cans of Stove bright satin black on the way, this puppy is getting restored. Do ya'll prime them first before painting or just shoot the Satin black straight on? (after prep of course). After reading on here it seems most folks just shoot the satin, only seems like people that do the satin metallic black use the primer.

Please let me know if you can help a brother out.

Thanks
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
85,996
South Puget Sound, WA
Remove the blank and make a cardboard template of it that you can take to a good, glass shop. Ask for neoceram or pyroceram glass to be cut to fit the template. Or it can be ordered online via www.onedayglass.com.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
By the looks of the pics it was a Metallic Brown finish. Same color is still available from Forrest Paints, Stove Bright brand.
No primer under high temp paint. Not necessary unless being used outdoors.

The original glass was not clear. It has a golden / amber tint to it. I believe it was smooth on one side, textured on the other. I think @CamFan on this site has some new old stock of them left over if you want original. Specify Series III full size. He has, or had smaller Honey Bear glass panels too.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
It looks to be "Brass and Glass" option too. If the door edges and around glass raised areas are brass use ONLY polish for precious metals like Maas Metal Polish on it. Nothing abrasive. Maas leaves a protective coating as well. Not cheap, but the best metal polish I've found.
Same with door pins if brass plated and the air intake dampers may be solid brass. The edges look like it, difficult to tell in pics. If so, polish edges with metal polish and they will look like this;

Solid Brass before and after.JPG Draft Caps 4.JPG
 

AeroScout

New Member
Jan 6, 2021
16
Texas
Hello Begreen, I have looked online for the glass. I may go that route but had seen in previous threads where member @CamFan seemed to have some originals available. Not sure which way I want to go yet. I found these as an option https://www.woodstove-fireplaceglass.com/fisher-isnert.html

Coaly, it does have the brass window surrounds and door trim. Sorta kinda a Brass and Glass Honey Bear Insert...but not really :) It is hard to tell yet but it also looks like the hinges may be brass as well. It appears to be on a hinge. The seller had hit it with something to clean it up and it sure is bright in that spot, looks brass to me. Almost like a good part of the door may be brass but it doesn't really show in the rough areas, only where it has been polished.

It looks to me to be almost blued. I thought I had read in the "All things Fisher" thread that some of the later inserts were neither black nor brown. From the looks of it I figure this is what I have. It does look rather brown in the pictures, but up close it really looks like and old worn bluing like you'd find on an old gun. Satin Black Stove paint is what is going to go on it. The intake dampeners are aluminum. I plan on painting them black and then polishing to make them look like the ones you posted in the picture above.

I also had sent you an email to [email protected] for plans on a baffle for this stove. It was a rather old post so hopefully that address is still valid.

I have spent several hours reading up here on the site. I am on the fence about the install. Our house was built in 77 and the stove appears to be one of the last models made so I figure they were made for eachother. I am debating on the whole boot/liner thing. We ran a custom insert in our home for decades without one. A guy I spoke to who removes these old stoves says he finds them in less than 1 in 10. As this stove is located in TX and we really won't use it all day everyday for weeks on end I think it is going to get installed per the original user manual instructions unless someone convinces me otherwise. I bought the stove for $300, after 6 hour round trip to get it, replacement glass, paint (I bought 4 cans) and then a liner/boot I am rapidly approaching $1000 to get this up and in the house...that was not part of the plan....LOL.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
23,118
central pa
Hello Begreen, I have looked online for the glass. I may go that route but had seen in previous threads where member @CamFan seemed to have some originals available. Not sure which way I want to go yet. I found these as an option https://www.woodstove-fireplaceglass.com/fisher-isnert.html

Coaly, it does have the brass window surrounds and door trim. Sorta kinda a Brass and Glass Honey Bear Insert...but not really :) It is hard to tell yet but it also looks like the hinges may be brass as well. It appears to be on a hinge. The seller had hit it with something to clean it up and it sure is bright in that spot, looks brass to me. Almost like a good part of the door may be brass but it doesn't really show in the rough areas, only where it has been polished.

It looks to me to be almost blued. I thought I had read in the "All things Fisher" thread that some of the later inserts were neither black nor brown. From the looks of it I figure this is what I have. It does look rather brown in the pictures, but up close it really looks like and old worn bluing like you'd find on an old gun. Satin Black Stove paint is what is going to go on it. The intake dampeners are aluminum. I plan on painting them black and then polishing to make them look like the ones you posted in the picture above.

I also had sent you an email to [email protected] for plans on a baffle for this stove. It was a rather old post so hopefully that address is still valid.

I have spent several hours reading up here on the site. I am on the fence about the install. Our house was built in 77 and the stove appears to be one of the last models made so I figure they were made for eachother. I am debating on the whole boot/liner thing. We ran a custom insert in our home for decades without one. A guy I spoke to who removes these old stoves says he finds them in less than 1 in 10. As this stove is located in TX and we really won't use it all day everyday for weeks on end I think it is going to get installed per the original user manual instructions unless someone convinces me otherwise. I bought the stove for $300, after 6 hour round trip to get it, replacement glass, paint (I bought 4 cans) and then a liner/boot I am rapidly approaching $1000 to get this up and in the house...that was not part of the plan....LOL.
A liner for that stove will probably be north of $1000 alone. And yes you absolutely need a liner. Running a slammer is very risky and completely against code. So if something happens and you were the one who installed it that way your insurance most likely will not pay
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
Yes, that is "Brass and Glass". The entire door is plated. Then painted in the center and wiped off around the edges with mineral spirits.
It was also Metallic Brown. That color has a purple hue to it, in different light it changes. It is still used on some new stoves the last I was in a hearth shop.

Brass and Glass 2.jpg Brass and Glass

Honey Bear Insert.jpg This is the same Metallic Brown that is the best color example I have in natural light. Both of these stoves are the same color. The metallic metal flakes reflect differently looking very purple in subdued light.

Only cast iron feet were treated with black oxide on the order of gun bluing to make the bear feet black. Stoves were all painted.

Here is a nickel plated door before paint, they were plated inside and out.

Insert Nickel Napa 1.jpg Insert Nickel  2.jpg

Yes, that is a good email address.

What diameter and height is the chimney flue? Is the chimney inside or out?
The problems without a liner are leaks around the Insert face. Absolutely all air must go through firebox with no leakage around it. That allows indoor air to cool the flue and less vacuum in the stove allowing the air wash to push in keeping the glass clean. They stay reasonably clean at the bottom where the most air flow is, but not great. It need all the draft it can get for good air wash.

The second issue and the big deciding factor is when you do have to clean it, you need to remove the Insert, scape the entire fireplace clean and vacuum it up. A liner simply lets everything fall into the stove, let the dust settle inside and shovel it out. Just moving these in and out of the fireplace on boards is enough to line the chimney for me. I've learned to use black iron pipes cut about a foot long for rollers. Remove the faceplate, pinch bar the Insert up and get the rollers on boards raised on blocks and 4 X 4's.

The third issue for us folks up North is saving a lot of fuel. They stay so much hotter with less heat left up, big difference when you go a month below freezing with constant burning. That's not as big of a factor for you.

Here's the flat gasket under glass, then it gets flat gasket cemented in door seal channel on stove front. I put silver anti-seize on the screw threads and never had a problem removing them.

eBay $1018-7.jpg

My Goldilocks in January 1985 was $1191.55 with tax. Included stove, pad, chimney and double wall connector pipe complete. So 36 years later you're still cheaper than 1985 ! Go price a new Insert and see what it looks like in 36 years......... I'm seeing Fishers selling for more than new around here and a set of feet now average $400. !!
 

AeroScout

New Member
Jan 6, 2021
16
Texas
I am at work now and just had a look last night, going off of the mark 1 eyeball, the flue dampener is approximately 4 feet from the base of the fireplace give or take a little. It is a housing approx 18-20 inches across and about 6 inches tall with a dampener plate that is about 5 inches tall and opens on an angle to about the same. It has the cast iron handle to open and close. The fireplace and chimney are brick and the thing is massive. Red brick face and hearth from floor to ceiling and about 6 feet across inside the house and the chimney is exterior brick and probably about 5 feet wide and 3 feet deep and goes from the slab foundation all the way up the height of the roof peak. The inside of the chimney is square ceramic sections that begin right above the cast iron dampener plate housing and go to the top of the chimney and if memory serves they are approx 12x12?

4 of us were able to wrestle it up on my low trailer, I used my engine hoist to get it off. It is now on a 1000lb furniture dolly out in the garage for cleanup and paint prep. I had cut multiple pieces of 3/4 PVC pipe to 2.5 foot sections to do the Egyptian block roll thing to get my gun safe in the house and I figured that is what I would do to maneuver it into the house. I figure I may put 3/4 plywood down on the floor and use my engine hoist once again to lift it up high enough and swing it in to get it on the hearth. I have some 1/4 inch aluminum sheets that I figured I would put on the hearth to then be able to put a little cooking oil on and slide it into position.

I also think I am going to use some of those aluminum sheets to cut and weld a baseplate for the bottom of the fireplace. I don't know if I will need to use them, but the leveling feet seem like a whole bunch of weight focused in two very small places on the brick masonry. I don't know but that seems a little sketchy having that much weight on those two little feet not knowing what is underneath the brick in those places. Seems like having a metal baseplate under the insert to evenly distribute the weight is a good idea.

The prices are something else, and must be somewhat niche. This stove I bought for $300 was on craigslist for 3 weeks with no takers, I am rather surprised I got it....Praise God! The only other Fisher in the area is a 2 door Grandma and they want $1000 for it. I am very excited to get this beast cleaned up and put it place....I need to hurry or it will be done just in time for the return of 100 degree weather.
 
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coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
Your chimney flue is far too large for a stove.
An open fireplace is designed with a large flue due to the large opening that allows so much flow up it. Along with the flow is most of the heat, the reason a fireplace is so inefficient. So a stove having a tiny air intake and smaller outlet doesn’t work well connected to the big original flue.

The object is keeping the flue gas temperature above 250*f. all the way to the top when smoke is present. Below that temperature, water vapor from combustion condenses on flue walls allowing smoke particles to stick. This is creosote. When a pipe or flue increases in diameter it allows the exhaust gasses to expand. This cools the gasses by a lot. I’ve measured a 6 to 8 pipe increase drops the flue gas temp by 1/2! That means if you’re leaving 500* exhaust up the stack, it cools down to about 250 before even rising up the flue and cooling as it goes. A 6 to 8 is about twice the increase in size. 2 inches doesn’t seem like much, but it is 28.26 increasing to 50.24! Your outlet size is 8 inch round which is 50.24 square inches. A square flue 8X 8 is 64. That is acceptable. Exact is best, and insulated so there is no expansion and it stays hotter easier with less cooling to the top. The more it cools, the more you have to leave up, the less you have to radiate into the house. 12 x 12 is 144 square inches. You’re expanding so much in the large area above and behind Insert you won’t have enough waste heat to keep the flue above the 250* critical temperature. As it cools, it also slows the rising. This lowers draft, which lowers how much air goes in. Then you have a slow burning cooler fire, soot on glass, and wonder why the Insert won’t heat the area it’s designed to heat, because it won’t burn right. You need an insulated liner.

Think of the chimney as the engine that drives the stove. A larger engine makes more horsepower, but needs more fuel to do it. The chimney uses heat for fuel. Your larger chimney has more capacity to pass more btu that was waste from the fireplace. Your stove doesn’t have that much heat to waste. It won’t have the fuel (heat) for that chimney to make the stove go. Like starving a large engine with a little fuel. Any stove will work well with a good chimney the right size. No stove will work with a poor one. The chimney is much more important than the stove.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
Once you have the correct size chimney you can think about adding a baffle to make it more efficient. The baffle prevents heat loss up the chimney, so the better the flue insulation, the larger you can make the baffle. You can see how chimney size becomes more critical with a smaller stove. I’ve had people in cabins with large fireplaces like yours try to heat with a Baby Bear and couldn’t heat the cabin. I explained how the stove was losing all the heat to keep chimney hot and they needed to decrease diameter down to the stove size. After that, the little stove drove them out. A smaller firebox doesn’t have enough fuel (lost heat) to make a larger chimney work. The larger chimney has more capacity for a larger stove, but it takes more heat to generate more draft. It’s a fine balance and you need to size the stove to chimney, or chimney to stove.
 
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AeroScout

New Member
Jan 6, 2021
16
Texas
Ok.

My current flue has a dampener that appears to be approx 18-20 inched across and about 5 inches tall, it runs all the way across the upper part of the smoke chamber. The outlet on the stove is 8 inches. How would one make this transition through that space from 8 inch pipe below to 8 inch pipe above?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
23,118
central pa
Ok.

My current flue has a dampener that appears to be approx 18-20 inched across and about 5 inches tall, it runs all the way across the upper part of the smoke chamber. The outlet on the stove is 8 inches. How would one make this transition through that space from 8 inch pipe below to 8 inch pipe above?
Cut the damper frame out
 

AeroScout

New Member
Jan 6, 2021
16
Texas
Not that it matters much but I checked the chimney diameter, it is 11x11.

I also measured the dampener, it is more like 27 inches across. I see how I can cut it out however it looks like it is resting on a steel bar/angle iron on the front edge. Even if I cut it out it is exactly 8 inches across from the edge of the masonry on the back side to the edge of the steel in the front.

Remove top row of bricks in smoke chamber to widen the area? What is the OD of 8 inch insulated chimney pipe? Looks like it will still have to transition negotiating an angle, not real clear at this point if it would be a straight shot from stove exit to top of chimney. Bit of a dog leg there.

ETA: I have also seen where people reduce from 8 inches at stove exit flange to 6 inches. ?

ok I am biting....do ya'll have a quick link to what I need so I can get an idea? I will have to go back and find the mod people were doing to make a flange for the stove exit with dampener.

MyDampener.jpg Flange.jpg
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
23,118
central pa
Not that it matters much but I checked the chimney diameter, it is 11x11.

I also measured the dampener, it is more like 27 inches across. I see how I can cut it out however it looks like it is resting on a steel bar/angle iron on the front edge. Even if I cut it out it is exactly 8 inches across from the edge of the masonry on the back side to the edge of the steel in the front.

Remove top row of bricks in smoke chamber to widen the area? What is the OD of 8 inch insulated chimney pipe? Looks like it will still have to transition negotiating an angle, not real clear at this point if it would be a straight shot from stove exit to top of chimney. Bit of a dog leg there.

ETA: I have also seen where people reduce from 8 inches at stove exit flange to 6 inches. ?

ok I am biting....do ya'll have a quick link to what I need so I can get an idea? I will have to go back and find the mod people were doing to make a flange for the stove exit with dampener.

View attachment 271513 View attachment 271514
No I don't have a quick link for a parts list for your install. Personally I think they run best on 7" and yes take a row of brick out if need be. You don't need anything fabricated you have a round outlet just use a liner adapter
 

AeroScout

New Member
Jan 6, 2021
16
Texas
So I need a liner adapter (I like the 7 inch idea)...that (looking at other posts here) will need to be modified (like the picture of one I posted above?) to enable the original dampener on the Stove insert to function. A boot? (Or is the adapter the boot?) some kind of pass through plate to seal the smoke chamber of the fireplace below from the chimney above and 7 inch double walled(?) chimney pipe to go all the way to the top of the preexisting chimney.

I am taking clues from this diagram of a country comfort insert (the sealed plate).

Is that about right?
 

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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
23,118
central pa
So I need a liner adapter (I like the 7 inch idea)...that (looking at other posts here) will need to be modified (like the picture of one I posted above?) to enable the original dampener on the Stove insert to function. A boot? (Or is the adapter the boot?) some kind of pass through plate to seal the smoke chamber of the fireplace below from the chimney above and 7 inch double walled(?) chimney pipe to go all the way to the top of the preexisting chimney.

I am taking clues from this diagram of a country comfort insert (the sealed plate).

Is that about right?
You have a round outlet on the stove with a bar for the damper across it right? So take an 8" round adapter and notch it for the bar.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
23,118
central pa
So what is meant by "a boot"?
Typically a boot is something that bolts down to the top of the stove giving you a round outlet to hook a liner to. You don't need this because you already have a round outlet
 
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AeroScout

New Member
Jan 6, 2021
16
Texas
No I don't have a quick link for a parts list for your install. Personally I think they run best on 7" and yes take a row of brick out if need be. You don't need anything fabricated you have a round outlet just use a liner adapter
This would be considered a quick link to what I am looking at right?


As far as insulating the liner, I would think that Thermix or Everguard would be a better choice than liner blanket yes?
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
23,118
central pa
This would be considered a quick link to what I am looking at right?


As far as insulating the liner, I would think that Thermix or Everguard would be a better choice than liner blanket yes?
Yes that is a link to a site that sells liners.

And no pour in is not better especially not for an insert.
 

AeroScout

New Member
Jan 6, 2021
16
Texas
I have been looking around
Yes that is a link to a site that sells liners.
I have been looking around. That site is a good reference for one that needs to get an idea of what all is required.

They are one of the few places that I have found that sells a 7 inch liner let alone a 7 inch liner kit. I need 15 feet.

If you were going to buy one where would it be from? Any particular brand/type? I do not see myself ever burning anything other than wood.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
23,118
central pa
I have been looking around


I have been looking around. That site is a good reference for one that needs to get an idea of what all is required.

They are one of the few places that I have found that sells a 7 inch liner let alone a 7 inch liner kit. I need 15 feet.

If you were going to buy one where would it be from? Any particular brand/type? I do not see myself ever burning anything other than wood.
I am a professional you can't but from the suppliers I use. But in your case I would use a heavy wall 304 flex liner with 1/2" insulation kit. You could probably go down to a midweight liner but with an old smoker like you have I wouldn't use lightwall.
 

AeroScout

New Member
Jan 6, 2021
16
Texas
I am a professional you can't but from the suppliers I use. But in your case I would use a heavy wall 304 flex liner with 1/2" insulation kit. You could probably go down to a midweight liner but with an old smoker like you have I wouldn't use lightwall.
So I have been looking at liners. What I find for Heavy wall seems to be smooth double lined .013 thickness. If I am not mistaken I have read on this very sight to stay away from double wall liners.

Do you have a recommendation on which heavy wall 304 flex liner?