Green wood in shed

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Minister of Fire
Mar 28, 2011
618
Corunna, Michigan
Probably already know the answer but it’s worth a shot …

I have oak , hickory , and some sugar maple that a local farmer cleared some fence rows and some small patches of woods this summer . He’s limbed everything and even stacked the logs for me with easy access .
Doesn’t get any easier than this !

Question is would you cut/split / and stack this in a wood shed ? I have always let the green wood season outdoors . My woodshed has been filled with dead standing ash for years so never tried green wood . Wood shed is a round barn with ventilation on all sides .
 

hickoryhoarder

Minister of Fire
Apr 5, 2013
733
Indiana
I'd use a wood shed if available.
 

johneh

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2009
4,355
Eastern Ontario
All mine goes in a woodshed
Keeps rain and snow off it
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
6,153
Long Island NY
it depends when you need it. If not for 3 years, you can leave it outside. Preferably off the ground, without leaves falling on them so they keep somewhat dry.
If you do want to use it sooner, then I'd split, stack in a shed now.

Basically, I'd put it in a shed (split) 3 years before you need it. What happens before that is not that important as long as you can avoid rot (i.e. off ground, some wind). Maybe debark them - avoids more bugs.
 

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Minister of Fire
Mar 28, 2011
618
Corunna, Michigan
I guess I was worried that green wood would mold somewhat . I’ve got plenty of room for it . It would save on handling it twice .
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
6,153
Long Island NY
If you have room to stack it split and covered, then you're good for sure.

Some mold does not matter. I have some moldy wood now. Been stacked covered for 3 summers. But it was a wet mess here this year. I won't bring much to store inside because of the mold. But as long as it's dry enough inside (on a resplit fresh surface) it'll be just fine.

There is a thread about fuzzy wood here.
 

weatherguy

Minister of Fire
Feb 20, 2009
5,902
Central Mass
Throw it in the shed, it'll still dry.
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
2,455
Woolwich nj
Probably already know the answer but it’s worth a shot …

I have oak , hickory , and some sugar maple that a local farmer cleared some fence rows and some small patches of woods this summer . He’s limbed everything and even stacked the logs for me with easy access .
Doesn’t get any easier than this !

Question is would you cut/split / and stack this in a wood shed ? I have always let the green wood season outdoors . My woodshed has been filled with dead standing ash for years so never tried green wood . Wood shed is a round barn with ventilation on all sides .
Your wood is seasoning outdoors even if its in a wood shed. A wood shed is not temperature controlled. Green weed seasons well in a shed. All my wood is green going in the shed and seasons well
 
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firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
19,593
Unity/Bangor, Maine
Me . . . I like to handle my wood as much as I can so I stack it outside for a year or two . . . and then move it into the woodshed to season an additional year or two. When I start pulling wood from the shed I know it is ready to go without any doubt in my mind (or a moisture meter).
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
7,675
Northern NH
If you have the space, stack the rows in the shed with spacers in between the rows. Just set aside uncut branches and pile them in with the standard splits to space between the rows. That stiffens up the piles from falling over but gets a lot more air flow between the stacks. BTW, a wood shed only needs a wall on the prevailing weather side. I have an open roof supported by four posts. It closed on the prevailing wind end with the back open except for some cross braces. The downwind side is always open and the front gets a tarp over it in winter.
 

Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
1,278
Palmyra, WI
As long as there is ventilation you should be good. A roof overhead, and slats that stay open or can be opened works. Think of tobacco sheds (slatted sides, goes in green, comes out dry and cured, but not moldy), or cob corn (goes in damp, has slats for sides and a partition down the middle for ventalation and to prevent mold).
 
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