Hollow

ispinwool

Burning Hunk
Feb 5, 2010
235
Butler County, Pa.
I'm always amazed that trees can remain standing even though they're so hollow. Luckily, our friend Ted noticed the problem and had them dropped safely. (And offered us the wood for the hauling)

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blades

Minister of Fire
Nov 23, 2008
3,595
WI, Leroy
lots of stories on hollow trees like getting a bath because the trunk was full of water. ( not sap)
 

DickRussell

Feeling the Heat
Mar 1, 2011
264
central NH
As far as strength to resist being snapped by wind, the trunk is like a beam. More of the bending strength is provided the farther you go from the neutral axis (center). Consider any steel or wood beam. The greatest part of the load carrying ability of the beam is away from the center. For steel, that's why there are flanges top and bottom. For a wood beam, it is strongest when loaded on it's thin edge, rather than with flat side down. Also, the place to make holes in any structural beam is near the center (neutral axis). You never cut into the flanges on a steel beam or notch the top or bottom of a wood beam (although some trades do on occasion notch a wood beam, weakening it substantially). So the core of a tree can be hollowed out by bugs and rot without weakening the tree too much.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,648
Downeast Maine
I haven't cut any myself quite like that one, but many of the fir and spruce trees I've cut down, especially the larger ones, have hollows towards the root flare. I might be pretty salty to cut down a tree that size to find it hollowed out at the best part for the mill!
 
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NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
463
SE WI
We use those hollow rounds for "chimney logs" in the campfire. Get it going good, let it die down some, stand a hollow log on end. It's pretty cool, even better with some copper tubing with vinyl hose stuffed inside dropped down the "chimney" (or old Christmas light strings).
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,710
07462
We use those hollow rounds for "chimney logs" in the campfire.
I have a couple rounds from my haul that are like that, purposely saving them to try that fire method.
 
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gzecc

Minister of Fire
Sep 24, 2008
4,785
NNJ
I was cutting a limb off a tree once and the water laying inside the tree pours out on my arm. Thought it was blood from chainsaw cut at first.
 

MoDoug

Minister of Fire
Feb 3, 2018
548
NE Missouri
We use those hollow rounds for "chimney logs" in the campfire.
I set those aside also for using in the outdoor fire pit. I've got about 8 of them after this past cutting season, ready to go. It's just fun to have a different fire, the kids roast marshmallow over the chimney. I've never done the copper pipe, but a friend used to.
 
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ispinwool

Burning Hunk
Feb 5, 2010
235
Butler County, Pa.
I'm definitely gonna try a 'chimney' with a couple! :)
 
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MoDoug

Minister of Fire
Feb 3, 2018
548
NE Missouri
I'm definitely gonna try a 'chimney' with a couple! :)
I usually set a few logs down first, then set the chimney on them to get it up off the ground, this allows air to draft up. You can also feed sticks from underneath doing that, or just set some in the chimney.
 
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Solarguy3500

Member
Dec 3, 2020
98
Western MA
I have a few nice hollow logs from one of the maples I've been working on.
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I'm going to be doing a fire in the fire pit soon with some brush that has accumulated over the winter. I'll have to try the chimney thing with those hollow logs.
 
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