Jotul F 500 Oslo

Jason A Posted By Jason A, Jun 27, 2018 at 6:19 AM

  1. Jason A

    Jason A
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    Jun 27, 2018
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    Hi Everyone,

    I'm considering upgrading from my 1979 Vermont Castings Resolute. So far I'm really liking the Jotul F 500 Oslo. Does anybody have any actual experience using this stove as a main heat source in a northern climate? I'm very interested in burn-time and overall output. Any other tidbits about the stove would be greatly appreciated.

    I've also looked at the Jotul F 55 Carrabassett. I'd also appreciate anybody's opinion using this stove as their main heat source.

    Thanks in advance! This is my first post and I'm excited to have found this forum.

    Jason
     
  2. ratsrepus

    ratsrepus
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    Jan 5, 2018
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    ran one for 8 years. Knowing what I know now about tube stoves I wouldn't do it again . Im in Michigan, not sure how your winters compare to ours. I found its a hard stove to control, the air system sucks, and I would get maybe 4 to 5 hrs in the dead of winter. The money your going to spend there are a lot of other options out there. I replaced a VC downdraft stove and the Oslo with Blazekings.
     
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  3. begreen

    begreen
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    @firefighterjake has been heating with one for years. Search on his threads on the F500 Oslo.
     
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  4. stovelark

    stovelark
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    I heated with one for years and think it is a superior stove. I found burn times to be around 8-9 hrs of medium heat output to heat around 1600 sqft. Its one of the prettiest stoves available and is made by a quality stove co. It will hold 20-22 inch logs easily, and if the wood is dry and seasoned along with a decent drafting chimney, I think will please most people. I do feel steel stoves are easier to operate, heat up quicker and cost less too, but if you are looking for a top name in cast iron wood stoves, I'd heartily suggest Jotul. There are thousands of Oslos out there keeping folks warm.
     
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  5. Jason A

    Jason A
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    Jun 27, 2018
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    Thanks for the feedback everyone. Still in the research phase but the input is very helpful!
     
  6. Cast Iron

    Cast Iron
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    Mar 16, 2018
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    Our Oslo was the 99% 24/7 heat for heating about 1500 sq ft reasonably insulated to 90's standards 2 story cape in northern VT for over 12 years.
    It is replaced ( new brand will remain anonymous !) after overfiring ;em and way too expensive needed repair parts.
    Some caveats in burning that Jake will agree with:
    The front door cannot be used for loading. Ash piles up against the door, then is a PITA to clean up the spill.
    Never crack the ash pan for a fire. It Will crack and deform the casts and tubes.
    Get the blue/black enamel finish and a cook plate.
    18" splits work best.
    Fine ash pan for daily emptying when used for heat.

    Excellent quality and looks.
     
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  7. xman23

    xman23
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    You can get a 26 inch split in it. May not be the largest stove, but a great heater.
     
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  8. Simonkenton

    Simonkenton
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    Feb 27, 2014
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    I have had an Oslo for 2 years. I am up in the North Carolina mountains. My girlfriend and I like this stove. We burn it a lot.
    It is a beautiful stove, easy to light. Easy to load. Yes it will take big sticks, I cut a bunch of 22 inch wood but hard to handle with that side door.
    So I am cutting 18 inch pieces these days.

    We get a burn time of about 6 hours at 350 degrees. It will hold coals for 10 or 12 hours if you are using good wood like locust or hickory.

    I have had 7 wood stoves and this is the messiest wood stove I have ever had. Yeah, ashes spill out of the front door. And they also spill out of the side door.
    The ash pan is a PITA we do not dump ashes out of it, just leave it full and dump it out in May each year. We have a big soup ladle and we just go in and scoop out the ashes.

    Good stove I am glad to have it. It is the most beautiful stove on the market and the fire view through the glass doors is wonderful.
     
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  9. xman23

    xman23
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    LOL, I think It's going to get a bit messy if the ash is 6 inches deep and you clean it out in May. We empty the pan every 2 or three days. It's not full and no issues. Only use the side door to load. Ours is spotless clean operation.
     
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  10. Simonkenton

    Simonkenton
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    Earth to xman.... come in, xman. Read my post carefully "we dump it out in May each year. We have a big soup ladle and we just go in and scoop out the ashes."

    The ash pan is dumped out in May, The big soup ladle is used during the burning season, every other day or so we scoop the ashes out of the firebox of the Norwegian stove with the big soup ladle, and we keep the firebox clean.
     
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  11. Ashful

    Ashful
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    @Nick Mystic and @Cast Iron. Of course, cast iron is the only member of this forum who actually heats entirely with wood, in a non-tropical climate.
     
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  12. heavy hammer

    heavy hammer
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    I used one for 5 years, heated 1600 plus sq feet easily. Beautiful stove great heater, easy to operate. Only thing I didn't like was the ash coming out when the front door was opened, but you figure it out, and it is a stove. I have nothing but good things to say about Jotul. I also live in northeast Ohio, and we like a very warm house. I don't think you will be disappointed, just have dry wood to feed it and enjoy.
     
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  13. jotul8e2

    jotul8e2
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    Feb 2, 2008
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    I've had one for eight or nine years. I heat with it 24/7 EXCEPT when the outside temperatures get up into the upper 40's or so. It is not good at low and slow.

    Some comments on the comments:
    It prefers dry wood.
    The only way to get a 26 inch split into this stove would be diagonally. The maximum length available in the firebox is 24", some portions at the front and back are 22" maximum, and it loads better with 20" to 22" pieces.
    The ash pan is a good as any. I empty mine about every third day. Yes, you will have to sweep up some ashes, but it is not big deal.
    It needs dry wood.
    The front door opens? Who knew? I have perfected the "long arm" technique of cleaning the glass though the side door.
    The side door ash lip is totally inadequate for the purpose. This is why we have "tile".
    Does not perform well unless wood is dry and seasoned.
    A good load of oak will keep a good bed of coals for up to 10 hours. After that it is hit or miss.
    Quality is excellent. Maintenance is probably as low as any cast iron stove.
    Unless the stove is nearly cold, open the side door, then the ash pan door before removing the ash pan. Or begin the operation of a blast furnace - your choice.
    Do not think about using any wood not seasoned and dry.
     
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  14. xman23

    xman23
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    Yea, Maybe I'm guilty of not reading or understanding all of what you wrote. I was envisioning the ash spilling out the side door. I don't recall that happening, but I don't let the ash get that deep. That said the stove does cold start better with a good bed of ash.
     
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  15. begreen

    begreen
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    Yes, cold starts were definitely quicker in the Castine with a bed of ash established. By switching to doug fir we were able to keep the ash buildup reasonable. There was still some spillage when the ash bed got high, but not too serious. I was able to run the stove with about 2 weeks between shoveling out ash.
     
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  16. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
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    Been running my Jotul as my main heat source here in Maine (well 90-95% of my heat source . . . I get lazy in late Spring and the oil boiler does kick on occasionally when I am away) for the past 9 years (2008.)

    My thoughts in a minute, but I guess I could sum up my feelings for this stove with this statement: In all of the years here I've seen prettier stoves, longer burning stoves and stoves with more features and on occasion I've thought about buying a different stove, but what I constantly come back to is the fact that this stove has been reliably keeping me and my wife warm for several years with nothing done to the stove other than cleaning it and a year or so back I changed out a couple of gaskets.

    I think buying a stove is similar to buying a car. There are all kinds of makes and models to choose from. Some are larger, some small . . . some are really fancy, others quite plain. Some have some cool tech, others are pretty simple. Some may require more maintenance, others less. Some will go longer, others go less. Just like there is no perfect car for every single person . . . there is no perfect stove for every single person. It's all in what you value.

    Me . . . I value simplicity and reliability. The Oslo has pretty much hit the target on my wants. Now, if I was to look for a longer burning stove since I valued that more then I would take a look at the cat stoves.

    OK, that said . . .

    Burn Time: This "time" depends on a lot of factors: BTU value of the wood, moisture content of the wood, how much wood is packed into the firebox, strength of the draft, etc. By this I mean a person who packs in well seasoned 22 inch oak or sugar maple into the stove and has the ability to slow up the burn with a damper will most likely get a longer burn than a person burning 18 inch red maple, white birch, etc. in a stove without a damper.

    Moreover, the definition of "burn time" is one of those things here which is often debated: is burn time the time from when the fire is lit until the coals go out, when the stove produces meaningful heat, time from when the fire is lit to when there are no visible flames, etc.

    I would consider burn time to be the time of meaningful heat . . . and in my case . . . with 18-20 inch mix of wood (yellow birch, beech, red maple, sugar maple. elm, etc.) I tend to get a burn time of 5-8 hours.

    Wood Size: Pretty sure the firebox is rated for 22 inch wood. I find that cutting my wood to 18 or 20 inches makes things a bit easier when loading as coals and ash do build up, wood often isn't perfectly straight, etc. and I often find that it's just easier to put in wood a couple of inches shorter.

    Front Door: As mentioned the front door is best used for cleaning purposes . . . although one or two folks here have done some simple modifications (channel iron) to reduce the ash spillage out of the front.

    Ash Pan: I personally think the ash pan in this model is one of the best features. I tend to empty my ash pan 1-2 times a week. The only two concerns is if I let it go too long it can be a bit messy pulling it out with too much ash and ash can build up behind the pan and prevent the ash pan door from closing easily so I routinely take a few seconds and use a fireplace shovel to scoop out the bit of ash that falls behind the pan.

    Colors: Honestly, my only regret is not going with the blue black finish instead of being cheap and getting the matte black. The blue black finish just looks wicked nice.
     
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  17. heavy hammer

    heavy hammer
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    /firefighterjake couldn't have been said better!
     
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