Just bought my first rick. Is this normal?

Hksvr4

Member
Dec 3, 2019
49
NY
Left is the fresh oak right is seasoned oak.
7C9758B1-7EAA-4124-9CD2-67F57D181182.jpeg
24614714-6E4A-4F29-99DC-DC973E0D6FB3.jpeg
07D4E1EA-B62D-43C2-8E50-B8B515428A1D.jpeg
120E026B-DF5B-44CE-9E29-688750D39043.jpeg
0BE2DCE0-9610-4C6A-B281-5EF0899B849C.jpeg


this one is the seasoned bark.
CA3BAD7F-37E3-440B-83F9-E492B42EB023.jpeg
 

Manly

Feeling the Heat
Aug 8, 2017
474
CT
That’s one ugly Rick. Years ago I purchased a half face Rick that was butt ugly like that. Pox marks, rot, wet and stanky. Been cutting my own wood ever since. All good looking full faced Ricks at our house now.
 

billb3

Minister of Fire
Dec 14, 2007
4,667
SE Mass
That looks like the sapwood deteriorating, common with uncovered stacks, especially the top rows or stacks with covers that leaked and flooded an area in the stack. Or huge mountains of splits handled with front end loaders like huge piles of sand or mulch. That wood like like it was tossed out in a field and forgotten about for years. The heartwood in most cases is still usable but if there is no weight left the whole piece is likely shot. You could give the marginal pieces a stab it with a screwdriver test for softness.
If you can keep the soft ones really dry you might be able to burn them (during the day as they'll burn up rather quick) and get at least a little bit of heat out of them if you have no place to toss them.

These days, if you want decent wood, your best bet is to buy it fresh cut and split and age it yourself. ( if you're buying wood)
 
Last edited:

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
11,791
Southern IN

KC Matt

Burning Hunk
Oct 29, 2016
148
Kansas City
Left is the fresh oak right is seasoned oak.
View attachment 254888 View attachment 254891

this one is the seasoned bark.
I see very little difference between the two. Dry wood should be covered in large, deep cracks in the end grain from shrinkage. When was the "seasoned" wood split and how was it stored since?

Give it 2-3 years stacked up off the ground and in the sun and she'll be seasoned!
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
11,791
Southern IN
I see very little difference between the two. Dry wood should be covered in large, deep cracks in the end grain from shrinkage. When was the "seasoned" wood split and how was it stored since?
He said the "seasoned" was in log form, left by the previous owner of the home. Rounds won't check on the ends as much, and if it isn't all that "seasoned," not much "shrinkage" (Seinfeld reference) ;) may have taken place.
 

KC Matt

Burning Hunk
Oct 29, 2016
148
Kansas City
He said the "seasoned" was in log form, left by the previous owner of the home. Rounds won't check on the ends as much, and if it isn't all that "seasoned," not much "shrinkage" (Seinfeld reference) ;) may have taken place.

I was hoping to engage in a conversation about what seasoned wood is but yeah, both examples are green as can be. I was hoping to have a conversation about how wood doesn't even begin to season until it's split but that's a whiff also. Hopefully the OP reads this forum to see what seasoned wood looks like.

There is a reason I never became a teacher.