My woodshed project

Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
When you're done with that, get that tire changed on the tractor...
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,189
Indiana
The replacement is leaning up there, just waiting on me!
 

razerface

Minister of Fire
Jan 1, 2014
639
Ohio
What is the doubled post showing in the second pic,,sort of lined up with the tire. It doesnt go down to the ground.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,189
Indiana
I'm using reclaimed lumber from an old barn that was on my property. That post had some 2x4s nailed to it, I just haven't removed them yet.
 

legrandice

Burning Hunk
Oct 5, 2006
215
South Hadley, MA
Awesome! Some day I hope to graduate from tarps and pallets to a proper wood shed. Can't wait to see how this turns out.
 

Oldman47

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2015
1,011
Central Illinois
Nice 2x6 framing. Are you using joist hangers to make it handle the weight of the wood? I sure don't see any.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,189
Indiana
Nice 2x6 framing. Are you using joist hangers to make it handle the weight of the wood? I sure don't see any.
It's 2x8 framing with joist hangers in addition to the 3" screws holding it all together.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Osagebndr

glennm

Burning Hunk
Dec 26, 2010
192
S Ontario
I would watch the floor. There is a lot of weight in a cord of wood. I built mine like yours and the rim joist broke after it was full. What a pain, I had to remove all the wood and decking to get at it. We poured concrete supports in several places. No more problems
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,189
Indiana
I would watch the floor. There is a lot of weight in a cord of wood. I built mine like yours and the rim joist broke after it was full. What a pain, I had to remove all the wood and decking to get at it. We poured concrete supports in several places. No more problems
You used 2x8's with 2x6 decking? Joist hangers and lag bolts?
I sure don't want to do it twice. I'm trying to over build it, but I don't plan to get too carried away.
 
Last edited:

glennm

Burning Hunk
Dec 26, 2010
192
S Ontario
Yup, I thought I had it very strong but I was wrong. Extra support from the ground will really help. Maybe some cement blocks dividing the longer spans? I ended up pouring some footings under the joists right on top of the ground. If I did it again I would put down crushed stone or gravel and let the floor float until I had it filled up. Once settled I would lag it to the posts. Mine was 8 x 16 so the spans were 8'
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,189
Indiana
Yup, I thought I had it very strong but I was wrong. Extra support from the ground will really help. Maybe some cement blocks dividing the longer spans? I ended up pouring some footings under the joists right on top of the ground. If I did it again I would put down crushed stone or gravel and let the floor float until I had it filled up. Once settled I would lag it to the posts. Mine was 8 x 16 so the spans were 8'
8x16 with 2x8 framing? I could see it sagging, but It broke?
I'll just add another row of posts and a middle beam then. My biggest span will be 4' then. Thanks for the heads up.
 

Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,004
Northern IL
It is not uncommon for folks to misjudge the weight load of a building full of firewood. A cord of wet (green) oak is gonna hover around 4500 pounds +/-. That is a bunch of concentrated weight. For the record - nails are stronger in a shear than screws are.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ashful

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,189
Indiana
It is not uncommon for folks to misjudge the weight load of a building full of firewood. A cord of wet (green) oak is gonna hover around 4500 pounds +/-. That is a bunch of concentrated weight. For the record - nails are stronger in a shear than screws are.
I won't be putting green wood in it. I also won't be using any nails, on anything! I find it really hard to believe that nails would be any better. Either way, with the hangers I'll be good.
 

Oldman47

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2015
1,011
Central Illinois
With hangers you use specially made nails that are shorter than normal but quite thick. The people that make the hangers specifically call them out for proper hanger performance.
 

DougA

Minister of Fire
Dec 13, 2012
1,938
S. ON
That's a very similar area I installed mine with the ground sloping at the back. Are you planning on stacking back to front or side to side? I chose side to side so that the stacks had full support on the ends and I could stack as high as I could reach. Now my problem is getting to the stacks at the back in the winter. The slope with snow made it difficult/impossible to get the trailer to the back of the shed.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,189
Indiana
I won't need to get to the back of it. I'll load it from the front, I built it adjacent to the slab so I could work off of the concrete.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,189
Indiana
With hangers you use specially made nails that are shorter than normal but quite thick. The people that make the hangers specifically call them out for proper hanger performance.
I'm very familiar with common building practices. Thanks
 

Longstreet

Feeling the Heat
Mar 14, 2014
310
Atlanta
I'm very familiar with common building practices. Thanks
I won't be putting green wood in it. I also won't be using any nails, on anything! I find it really hard to believe that nails would be any better. Either way, with the hangers I'll be good.
You may think you are familiar with common building practices, but science and structural engineering have proven time and time again that in applications where the fastener are subject to high sheer loads, like hanging joist, a nail is stronger. Will your hangers with screws work? Who knows, no one here has any specs on what you are using. I just don't see any reason to use a screw in an application with almost no pull out force but a high sheer load.

But yea, it looks like a nice shed overall, I hope it works out great for you, congrats!
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,189
Indiana
You may think you are familiar with common building practices, but science and structural engineering have proven time and time again that in applications where the fastener are subject to high sheer loads, like hanging joist, a nail is stronger. Will your hangers with screws work? Who knows, no one here has any specs on what you are using. I just don't see any reason to use a screw in an application with almost no pull out force but a high sheer load.

But yea, it looks like a nice shed overall, I hope it works out great for you, congrats!
I'm not posting here to ask for the ins and outs of fasteners. I am open to real world experience that ones have had with their wood sheds.
And I am very familiar with building practices. I've been in or around building trades my entire adult life.
 

Osagebndr

Minister of Fire
Feb 20, 2014
831
Central Indiana
I like the beam down the center for load bearing strength sounds like the ticket. If you don't want to have posts up thru the floor you could pour some 2'x2' pads and put a support from it to your beam. I looks good tho ==c