Norway on track to reach 100% EV sales in the next 2 years

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begreen

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Nov 18, 2005
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Just a few years ago they said it couldn't be done, but Norway reached 80% EV sales for new cars in 2022. Their goal is 100% by 2025. This was done with strong incentives and perks for EV owners and a good charging network. The fact that this is taking place in a range-reducing cold country is remarkable.

 
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When people and government care stuff gets done. It’s about the size of the Boston metro area. I do think smaller population allows change more quickly.
 
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When people and government care stuff gets done. It’s about the size of the Boston metro area. I do think smaller population allows change more quickly.
Indeed, or by govt. mandate. On the opposite spectrum, China expects to reach 50% of new car sales as BEVs by 2025. Not sure about PHEV sales at that point, but in 2022 they were 29% of new car sales. In 2021, the sales of electric vehicles in China reached 2.92 million and dominated more than half (53%) of the global market share.
 
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Just a few years ago they said it couldn't be done, but Norway reached 80% EV sales for new cars in 2022. Their goal is 100% by 2025. This was done with strong incentives and perks for EV owners and a good charging network. The fact that this is taking place in a range-reducing cold country is remarkable.

They want to keep as much of that expensive Norwegian crude available to sell to the rest of the world.

Smart folks. The Nordic countries have proven also that socialism can be a workable governing system. Works well when the population is pretty homogeneous. People don't like sharing as much when their fellow citizens look different from one another.

They have a culture of planning well for the future and cooperation, out of utter necessity. If you don't prepare for the long cold dark winters, and help each other out, you just freeze or starve come winter. So it makes a lot of sense that they got there quickly with their cultural advantages.
 
Good lord that is quick regardless of pop. size. I would like to go EV but am waiting as choices are growing and more to come. I want to see all the pickups but damn the pricing is scary right now. Looked at the Ford Lightening Pro and while they advertise starting at $39k, there are none at that price. I will never pay $65-90k for a pickup….nope, no way.
 
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When people and government care stuff gets done. It’s about the size of the Boston metro area. I do think smaller population allows change more quickly.
Less people in Norway then the state of Wisconsin. They also have an oil fund worth over a trillion dollars--the country is insanely wealthy. Having said that its pretty amazing how quickly they've moved to electric and that also allows them to export more oil they would have used internally. I believe most of their electricity comes from hydro.
 
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Yeah because mining for minerals is so great for the environment and doesn’t require fossil fuels…
The mining is limited and likely not sustainable for very long. It's destructive, sure - but sure is fossil fuel mining. I dont think there is enough material though for the next 10 years let alone 50+.
And electricity to charge cars does not need to come from mostly fossil fueled electric generating plants.

Id like to get a Tesla truck...the price (which I doubt it will be) and the appeal of an electric vehicle is one that Id like to try out, while I keep my ICE car.
 
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Norway reached 80% EV sales for new cars in 2022. Their goal is 100% by 2025.
Do you think we'll ever get there in the USA? I always suspected there was some ideal number below 100% for EV sales, as they're not really the ideal solution for 100% of vehicle profiles.

Daily commuters: 100%
Sports cars: perhaps 95%, there will always be some neo-classic market
Delivery vehicles and last-mile trucking: 100%, slam dunk!
Long-haul trucking: 50% (?)
Personal hauling (F-350's pulling horses, race cars, campers, etc.): 25%?
 
Hybrids capable of >50 miles electric qualify for the post-2030 milestones. I think that's where trucks will head. This was already close to a possibility with VIA trucks that had a Silverado powered with a Voltec drivetrain. Looks like VIA is making 100% electric trucks now.
 
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Do you think we'll ever get there in the USA? I always suspected there was some ideal number below 100% for EV sales, as they're not really the ideal solution for 100% of vehicle profiles.

Daily commuters: 100%
Sports cars: perhaps 95%, there will always be some neo-classic market
Delivery vehicles and last-mile trucking: 100%, slam dunk!
Long-haul trucking: 50% (?)
Personal hauling (F-350's pulling horses, race cars, campers, etc.): 25%?
Ever sure new passenger cars and trucks 1/2 ton and smaller sure. Can’t say when. Not before 2040. I think the odds are greater of a state outlawing the sale of new EVs though. I think the economics are there for long haul trucking that they will adopt sooner than general population. Owner operators that work local with fewer miles will be the holdout as far as commercial trucks. Personal trucks never Al long as they are legal being manufactured.
 
I think the economics are there for long haul trucking that they will adopt sooner than general population.
Agreed on most of your points, EbS-P. But with regard to this sentence, I think infrastructure will be the obstacle. Long-haul drivers may not see home based for days at a time, sometimes even weeks. Truck stops with charging at every slip are going to be the gating item, as well as good coverage of repair providers nation-wide. I see last-mile / delivery as the easy pickings, with long-haul lagging it by several years, at least. BEV fleet trucks are easier to manage when they come home to charge each night, and the limited service people with required training are at-hand.
 
I am fearful of having to fight for my right to charge my vehicle. I have a friend that wont do road trips with his EV for this reason. People park, charge, disappear........
I already get 'feisty' when I pull into a full gas station and just see a car there alone without the driver.

And the one thing I learned about batteries a long long time ago. It's allllllll a lie! Maybe the car industry is accurate, but I could easily see them blaming my uneven roads, hills etc for why Im getting a fraction of the advertised rate. I also enjoy air conditioning and HEAT....I will not compromise those things. I once had a car with the drive side window stuck up, no AC, and the heater was stuck on the lowest setting - and I commuted ONE WAY 1.25 hours in city traffic during one of the hottest summers on record. I swear I had heat stroke multiple times that year. (I couldnt pull the fuse on the heater for some reason, it would overheat the car). But I couldnt afford a different car as I was fairly new to the work force and just rented a place, so I was tapped out with the whole first month/last month/security deposit. Yikes was that a nightmare.
 
Agreed on most of your points, EbS-P. But with regard to this sentence, I think infrastructure will be the obstacle. Long-haul drivers may not see home based for days at a time, sometimes even weeks. Truck stops with charging at every slip are going to be the gating item, as well as good coverage of repair providers nation-wide. I see last-mile / delivery as the easy pickings, with long-haul lagging it by several years, at least. BEV fleet trucks are easier to manage when they come home to charge each night, and the limited service people with required training are at-hand.
I think your statement is valid today but once Tesla partners with a truck stop company to install 1MW chargers 500 mile range heck even 350 between stops for a charge will just be normal. It will role out just like their original charging network. CA first then two coast to coast routes. There will be stranded trucks (I want to know how you tow a Tesla semi?) the mileage is where the cost savings is. Last mile trucks will be electrified too. But the savings isn’t as great. (Batteries could be smaller).
 
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And the one thing I learned about batteries a long long time ago. It's allllllll a lie!
lol... are you implying that you got accurate MPG data from the makers of your non-battery vehicles? ;lol
Maybe the car industry is accurate, but I could easily see them blaming my uneven roads, hills etc for why Im getting a fraction of the advertised rate.
 
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lol... are you implying that you got accurate MPG data from the makers of your non-battery vehicles? ;lol
Yeah. My F150 was rated at 24mpg hwy and it might get that with a light foot on level ground at 50 mph. Put on a camper, go up a mountain, and it was getting 9mpg.
 
The batteries need to get better. I’ve heard of people not even making it half way from Duluth to Minneapolis in the winter months. Another guy bought a used one, drove it for a month and it wouldn’t hold a charge, had to fork out $13k for new battery pack. I think we have a ways to go.
 
lol... are you implying that you got accurate MPG data from the makers of your non-battery vehicles? ;lol
ha well, very true! But for once, Im actually getting exactly what my car said it would though around town. 23mpg.
My previous truck on the other hand. NO way.
 
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Yeah because mining for minerals is so great for the environment and doesn’t require fossil fuels…
Sweden just found a huge deposit of rare earth minerals and claim to have a much more environmentally friendly way to extract and process them. We will see
 
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Yeah because mining for minerals is so great for the environment and doesn’t require fossil fuels…
How do you think that fossil fuels come out of the ground? They require mining and destructive techniques. At least minerals mined for batteries have a much lower lifetime carbon footprint compared to literally burning fossil fuels. Burning a single gallon of gasoline equates to just a touch less than 9,000 grams of carbon, which doesn't even include the carbon used to mine and refine crude oil into the gasoline. The "cradle-to-grave" emissions from a single gallon of gasoline comes out to around 11.14 kg. Simply staggering.

Every time I see this argument I always ask "Are you suggesting we simply do nothing?"
 
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The batteries need to get better. I’ve heard of people not even making it half way from Duluth to Minneapolis in the winter months. Another guy bought a used one, drove it for a month and it wouldn’t hold a charge, had to fork out $13k for new battery pack. I think we have a ways to go.
I've heard of many people running out of gas while driving, having to fork out tens of thousands for powertrain repair, etc. These stories are not isolated to EVs and apply to any ICE application.
 
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Do you think we'll ever get there in the USA? I always suspected there was some ideal number below 100% for EV sales, as they're not really the ideal solution for 100% of vehicle profiles.

Daily commuters: 100%
Sports cars: perhaps 95%, there will always be some neo-classic market
Delivery vehicles and last-mile trucking: 100%, slam dunk!
Long-haul trucking: 50% (?)
Personal hauling (F-350's pulling horses, race cars, campers, etc.): 25%?
How does the rest of the world enjoy their hobbies without half ton or larger trucks?
 
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How does the rest of the world enjoy their hobbies without half ton or larger trucks?
It's not a hobby for me I need 3/4 ton minimum to haul what I need to haul. I could absolutely use electric though if one becomes available in basic work truck trim
 
I'd haul my sled on the roof of a car, but the po-po say no-go.

Norway on track to reach 100% EV sales in the next 2 years
 
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I've heard of many people running out of gas while driving, having to fork out tens of thousands for powertrain repair, etc. These stories are not isolated to EVs and apply to any ICE application.
So how many gas stations are there compared to recharging stations? How long does a EV battery pack last compared to a power train? I’m not against electric, I just think we have a long way to go to make it work.

Just read an article that in the UK EV charging stations just surpassed the cost of gas.
 
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