Old Gravity Vent Behind Stove?

CreosoteCowboy

New Member
Jun 1, 2019
26
MN
I've been working on getting a stove installed for the past ten months. Yesterday I had an installer out to put together a quote for an install, and I think we've agreed on a spot. The photo below shows the spot, with the hearth size taped out, and a notecard hung where the stove will rear-vent.

H84U4dN.jpg

As far as I know, the gravity vent no longer serves any real purpose since the heat is forced air. The installer seemed ambivalent about removing it.

Are there any advantages or disadvantages to removing the vent?
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
19,154
central pa
Is the vent connected to anything? If not it shouldn't matter much. But it's hard to tell how it will effect air flow.

It looks to me like you are planning to come straight out the back of the stove and through the wall. If so I would strongly recommend that you reconsider that. It means if you ever change stoves you will need to move the chimney. It can also make it a real pita to clean that horizontal run.
 

CreosoteCowboy

New Member
Jun 1, 2019
26
MN
Is the vent connected to anything? If not it shouldn't matter much. But it's hard to tell how it will effect air flow.

It looks to me like you are planning to come straight out the back of the stove and through the wall. If so I would strongly recommend that you reconsider that. It means if you ever change stoves you will need to move the chimney. It can also make it a real pita to clean that horizontal run.
Thanks for the feedback.

The vent is either stuck or sealed shut, like all the other gravity vents in the house. I'm not sure if the old ductwork is still connected or not.

As for the install, there's a strange little extension off a closet on the other side of the wall that's pictured, and the idea was to put a T there with access before going straight up through two stories and an attic, with the idea that cleaning would then be straightforward.

I hadn't thought about changing stoves and the height of the hole through the wall, though. That's a good catch. The other option would be to run the pipe up a bit before running it through the wall. I can see how what might make future stove changes easier.
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,101
Woolwich nj
Draft is difficult with 2 90s. Heat wants to move up, not back. Your better off with 2 45s. Remember draft is what runs the stove along with the quality of the wood. You can have great wood, but if your draft isn't great than your stove doesn't run great. Its just a thought.
 

Simonkenton

Minister of Fire
Feb 27, 2014
1,450
Marshall NC
I got onto this forum ten years ago with a new wood stove that wouldn't draw well. The guys informed me that the new stoves don 't like 2 90 degree bends. The fact that your installer didn't tell you about this makes me wonder if he knows what he is talking about.
 

EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
Jul 12, 2006
7,097
Schenectady, NY
To be fair. The original plan only had the one 90, the T.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
19,154
central pa
Yes 90s will reduce draft. And if it brings you below the required draft it is a bad thing. But if you have a tall chimney it can actually be benificial