please help id this firewood

I wasn’t on site to see the leaves
a very red color, some super fine sawdust/more like powder after I stacked it from insects I assume. Can't recall if it was easy to split or not, I think not but it was felled probably >1 year before I got it. Burns great, burns hot, starts easy/quick, decent coals. South central N.C.
Thank you.
 

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HisTreeNut

Minister of Fire
Nov 3, 2014
1,066
Burnsville, NC
+1 on it being cherry...when you get it burning, go outside and see what the smoke smells like. That should confirm it.

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+1 on it being cherry...when you get it burning, go outside and see what the smoke smells like. That should confirm it.

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Thank you guys. Is this the tree that can ooze dark sap about the consistency of firm breakfast jelly? I looked it up online so unsure if I'm thinking of the correct tree. And those cherries are maybe 4-5 times the size of a BB?
 

gac17

Member
Feb 23, 2013
41
Ct
Thank you guys. Is this the tree that can ooze dark sap about the consistency of firm breakfast jelly? I looked it up online so unsure if I'm thinking of the correct tree. And those cherries are maybe 4-5 times the size of a BB?
Sounds right. Very small cherries on these and trees in the cherry family respond to wounds with gummosis, the thick ooze you described.
 

keegantimber

New Member
Nov 3, 2019
10
On
Seeing lots of curiosity posts about black cherry recently and I recently posted asking same question about what wood this was.
Is this a decent wood to burn? I just finished cutting and getting ready to split in hopes of having a stove in a couple years.
 

hickoryhoarder

Feeling the Heat
Apr 5, 2013
383
Indiana
Black cherry. No question.
 

hickoryhoarder

Feeling the Heat
Apr 5, 2013
383
Indiana
Seeing lots of curiosity posts about black cherry recently and I recently posted asking same question about what wood this was.
Is this a decent wood to burn? I just finished cutting and getting ready to split in hopes of having a stove in a couple years.
Black cherry is super easy to split with a maul. I use it to teach people to split. It can be ready for the fire in as quick as six months, though twelve is good.

If you get some hickory and oak going in the stove, then add a piece of cherry, you get a beautiful fire, with dancing flames and nice colors. But by itself or with ash or maple it's not as exciting. Does not have nearly the BTUs of hardwoods, but easy to deal with. I like to have 10% of my stacks cherry. Never seems to have bugs or anything. For that reason you can keep it around three or four years if you have a lot of it.
 

HisTreeNut

Minister of Fire
Nov 3, 2014
1,066
Burnsville, NC
Cherry is a pretty decent wood....around 19.5 mbtu's per cord according to chart (white oak is 24.2 mbtu's and white pine is 14.2 mbtu's for comparison). . Splits easy, dries fairly quickly, decent burn time and coaling, & smells pretty good too. I have a bunch in my stacks and love to find it in scrounges. I would not turn it down at all...

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Thanks guys. My wood lot is mostly dead ash. Once its down I will have alot of black cherry left.
If what I have is black cherry then indeed it was excellent wood to burn, I had all super short lengths so kind of a PITA & not a good judge vs lengths I usually burn. I know now to get it when I see it. It was given to me super dry, I'm guessing 2 years old.
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
5,054
Northern NH
I am on the outer northerly fringe of black cherrys up in northern NH. I have never found a stand where they were dominant but on occasion I will find several of them in the same area mixed in with far more dominant beech or maple. Usually there is one larger trees and then several smaller trees nearby. The crowns don't deal well with icing events so most of mine have broken tops. I do find that they last quite awhile standing dead and even on the ground they may start rotting on the outside but still have worthwhile core. When I find a dead one or one that needs to be thinned I cut it but don't seek it out.