Potato skins in my Liberty

lopiliberty

Minister of Fire
Oct 7, 2011
959
Mineral County, WV
I have always heard to throw potato skins in the wood stove to help reduce creosote buildup. If I have any potato skins I usually throw them in on a good hot bed of coals. Although I have no buildup in the flue because the liberty burns so clean, I throw them in anyway just to get rid of them. Does anyone do this or know if it actually does any good?
 
Not sure it it works but I have heard of it and I know alot of people around here do it.
 

pen

There are some who call me...mod.
Staff member
Aug 2, 2007
7,946
N.E. Penna
I've also heard an apple a day keeps the doctor away.

Not sure if it helps or not, but I like apples so why not.

I do not do the potato skins in the stove unless they are still attached to the potatoes, and in a dutch oven w/ an inch layer of salt on the bottom with consumption being my goal.

pen
 

keninmich

Member
Dec 26, 2010
55
south-central michigan
I made taters in my Keystone tonight!

Cut them in little chunks...put them in some tin-foil ( wrapped it 3 times ) added some salt, pepper, butter and a can of mushrooms and put it on a very hot bed of coals.

I kept turning it over and over and by the time the steaks came off the grill....the taters were perfect!

I usually make these like this on the grill but since the stove was down to coals i gave it a shot. The wife was impressed! ( and thats rare! )
 

fossil

Accidental Moderator
Sep 30, 2007
10,568
Bend, OR
Sure, I'd put potato skins in my Liberty. Right over a nice hot coal bed, in a skillet and topped with bacon, cheddar, and sliced green onions...cooked to perfection, and then add a dollop of sour cream and serve hot. M-m-m-m-m-m!
 

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jeff_t

Minister of Fire
Sep 14, 2008
4,202
SE MI
lopiliberty said:
I have always heard to throw potato skins in the wood stove to help reduce creosote buildup. If I have any potato skins I usually throw them in on a good hot bed of coals. Although I have no buildup in the flue because the liberty burns so clean, I through them in anyway just to get rid of them. Does anyone do this or know if it actually does any good?
Judging by the responses of the moderators, the only function of a potato skin in a wood stove is culinary. I've also heard of aluminum cans, and I think there was a thread recently about that. I think you already know the only proven way to reduce/prevent creosote buildup.
 

NSDave

Member
Dec 29, 2011
114
Halifax NS Canada
keninmich said:
I made taters in my Keystone tonight!

Cut them in little chunks...put them in some tin-foil ( wrapped it 3 times ) added some salt, pepper, butter and a can of mushrooms and put it on a very hot bed of coals.

I kept turning it over and over and by the time the steaks came off the grill....the taters were perfect!

I usually make these like this on the grill but since the stove was down to coals i gave it a shot. The wife was impressed! ( and thats rare! )
MMM I'm hungry now; I can't wait for the new stove next week; I'm trying this out!
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
18,904
Unity/Bangor, Maine
fossil said:
Sure, I'd put potato skins in my Liberty. Right over a nice hot coal bed, in a skillet and topped with bacon, cheddar, and sliced green onions...cooked to perfection, and then add a dollop of sour cream and serve hot. M-m-m-m-m-m!
Please invite me to dinner some time . . . those look wicked good.
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
18,904
Unity/Bangor, Maine
jeff_t said:
lopiliberty said:
I have always heard to throw potato skins in the wood stove to help reduce creosote buildup. If I have any potato skins I usually throw them in on a good hot bed of coals. Although I have no buildup in the flue because the liberty burns so clean, I through them in anyway just to get rid of them. Does anyone do this or know if it actually does any good?
Judging by the responses of the moderators, the only function of a potato skin in a wood stove is culinary. I've also heard of aluminum cans, and I think there was a thread recently about that. I think you already know the only proven way to reduce/prevent creosote buildup.
+1 . . . There are lots of folk remedies and high tech fancy schmancy ways of supposedly keeping a chimney clean . . . but I've always found the best way is to a) burn seasoned wood, b) burn the stove at the proper temps in the correct manner (i.e. not too hot, not too cold and not allowing the fire to smolder) and c) checking and cleaning the chimney when necessary.

Sure, it's not as easy as throwing in the ol' Budweiser can or tossing in some potato peels or putting some chemicals in the woodbox . . . but it's one sure fire way to do things right.
 

BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
Fix them as fossil described and give them to your chimney sweep.
 

lopiliberty

Minister of Fire
Oct 7, 2011
959
Mineral County, WV
I kinda figured it wasn't doing any good. Like all on here have said the only way to prevent creosote is to burn dry wood and that is what I have been doing. The wood is so dry its just about to the rooting stage. I have done ALOT of cold starts this year and I know sometimes you can get creosote at the top of the flue but not here. Absolutely nothing in the flue, looks like new and I have been burning some green wood too.
 

Backwoods Savage

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2007
27,812
Michigan
Crushed beer cans are also said to work. Just another of those old wives tales.