Progress Hybrid Install and Experience

barnaclebob

Member
Nov 29, 2017
228
Puget Sound
Hello Everyone,

I wanted to check in here now so I don't seem like a flake when I really need help in the coming months...

My wife and I just bought an awesome house built somewhere between 1909 and 1920. It then went through several renovations up through the 40's including being raised and a walkout basement added, and a second floor added. Unless anything bad happens we'll close mid December and move in shortly after.

There is a brick chimney with what appears to be a clay liner that was probably used for a boiler because there is no fireplace. It runs from the basement up through the roof in the center of the house located on the windward side of the roof ridge which I have read is preferable on the wiki. Currently there is a pellet stove piped into the chimney and I assume nothing else because the high efficiency gas furnace is only 6 years old and has separate input/output lines through the side of the house.

Chimney.jpg

The first floor has a perfect place for a wood stove that should be able to send heat up the stairs to the second floor bedrooms as well. It will be located where the large china cabinet is in the picture and I believe the chimney is somewhere behind that wall. The pellet stove will have to be disconnected and I can make good use of it in my detached garage/workshop space after adding a chimney.

Living Room.jpg

Right now the Woostock Progress Hybrid is the leading contender because they look awesome, perform well, and their customer service seems to be awesome. Second choice was the VC Defiant flexburn but after reading about the history of the company I'm a little weary of them. We will probably be buying in spring when they hopefully go on sale.

I'll be getting a full chimney inspection so that I can determine if the clay liner is good or I need to add a new liner. Then I'll need to figure out how to pipe the new thimble? into the chimney on the first floor and add a chimney cap of some kind. After that it should be pretty straightforward to build the hearth pad but I may need some advice when it comes to a wood shed as the only viable location for it appears to be on a decent slope.

This forum has already been a great resource.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
79,115
South Puget Sound, WA
Good plan to get the chimney inspection. It may need a stainless liner to bring it up to code for wood burning. Looks like a very nice home. Woodstock has perpetual sales and prices have been going up steadily on the soapstone models. Waiting may find the future sales price is closer to the current list price.
 

Supersurvey

Burning Hunk
Jan 25, 2015
176
New Jersey
Welcome to the group.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,789
Southern IN
They should run some bigger sale in a few months..if you can stand to wait, that is. ;)
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
79,115
South Puget Sound, WA
Actually their soapstone stoves they seem to be going up faster. The Progress has gone up over $1000 in the past 5 years. The Fireview likewise. Maybe good quality soapstone is getting harder to find.
 
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sutphenj

Burning Hunk
Nov 19, 2010
160
West MI
Actually their soapstone stoves they seem to be going up faster. The Progress has gone up over $1000 in the past 5 years. The Fireview likewise. Maybe quality soapstone is getting harder to find.
Over the introductory launch pricing sure
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
79,115
South Puget Sound, WA
The Fireview has been out for decades.
 

BlueRidgeMark

Feeling the Heat
Oct 8, 2015
262
Virginia
... Then I'll need to figure out how to pipe the new thimble? into the chimney on the first floor and add a chimney cap of some kind. .
That's a job best left to professionals. Punching a hole in a 100 year old chimney is not the time for on-the-job training.


.I may need some advice when it comes to a wood shed as the only viable location for it appears to be on a decent slope..

I have a neighbor who has a firewood shed on a steep slope. All it takes is the right design.

You really need to think about how much wood you'll need. That will drive how big your shed, or sheds, need to be. Whatever you think you need, double it.

Why? Most people burn green wood and don't know it. Most firewood companies sell green wood. I suspect some of them know it, and some don't.

I don't know how long it takes to properly season wood in your climate, but I suspect it's a lot more than the few months that most firewood sellers give their wood. You really need a place for this year's wood, and next year's wood.
 

barnaclebob

Member
Nov 29, 2017
228
Puget Sound
That's a job best left to professionals. Punching a hole in a 100 year old chimney is not the time for on-the-job training.





I have a neighbor who has a firewood shed on a steep slope. All it takes is the right design.

You really need to think about how much wood you'll need. That will drive how big your shed, or sheds, need to be. Whatever you think you need, double it.

Why? Most people burn green wood and don't know it. Most firewood companies sell green wood. I suspect some of them know it, and some don't.

I don't know how long it takes to properly season wood in your climate, but I suspect it's a lot more than the few months that most firewood sellers give their wood. You really need a place for this year's wood, and next year's wood.
What are the main concerns with punching a hole in a chimney? I'm pretty capable DIY but just haven't tackled this job yet. The chimney is pretty small all the way to the basement but as long as the whole thing doesn't collapse I don't think I could do that much damage. But again I don't know what I don't know yet so there's that.

I think I can make a stair stepped woodshed work. I'll post some pics to the wood shed forum and solicit feedback in spring. There are some firewood dealers around here that seem to be reputable but I'll test their wood before they unload it, especially the first year's wood when I'll only have about 6 months.
 

BlueRidgeMark

Feeling the Heat
Oct 8, 2015
262
Virginia
What are the main concerns with punching a hole in a chimney? .... But again I don't know what I don't know yet so there's that.
Collapsing the structure comes to mind. It's like playing Jenga with high stakes. I'm pretty capable at just about any home project, but I don't think I'd tackle that.
 

barnaclebob

Member
Nov 29, 2017
228
Puget Sound
Alright, I've asked a couple more questions on other threads and you guys have given me some great advice. This seems like a good place for progress pics. The progress hybrid will be delivered Monday, chimney installer has been chosen, and the hearth construction started. Here are some pics of the hearth progress...

Masking Tape Layout
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2 layers of 1/2" durock for .78 of the .8 required R value
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About 2.5" of stone and cement should take care of the rest.
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Yes the dog painting will be moved. The outlet will be closely monitored for signs of thermal issues as well. Its not really necessary so I can cap the wires and cover it with a plate if needed.

Next up is to grout the stones with some more concrete and then place the stove on it Monday or later if we can't lift it with whoever shows up to help. Wood trim will be added after the chimney is installed.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
79,115
South Puget Sound, WA
The outlet shouldn't be a problem. Is that the house thermostat on the left? If so, that might need a new home if you still want heat in remote parts of the house with the stove going.

How many sq ft will the stove be heating?
 

Squirrel1410

New Member
May 16, 2017
62
Massachusetts
You’re doing almost exactly the same thing I did last year. And our house is 1923, so maybe a tad newer, but close. I even had an outlet in the same spot (I removed mine). Our thermostat is close to the stove (but not as close as yours). It’s nice, because when I’m using the stove It keeps the heat from kicking on, so I know that all burn time is $ saved.

As for punching into the chimney, I watched the guys do it with a masonry chisel, and thought it would have been really easy to just do it myself. We needed a stainless liner put in, and they almost couldn’t fit the 6” with the existing clay liner. Hopefully you can save money by not needing that, but I was told I needed it (by the town and the chimney guys). Unfortunately they busted out the old cast iron clean-out door (which I really liked) and just cemented their own clean-out for the new pipe. Oh well.
 

barnaclebob

Member
Nov 29, 2017
228
Puget Sound
As for punching into the chimney, I watched the guys do it with a masonry chisel, and thought it would have been really easy to just do it myself. We needed a stainless liner put in, and they almost couldn’t fit the 6” with the existing clay liner. Hopefully you can save money by not needing that, but I was told I needed it (by the town and the chimney guys). Unfortunately they busted out the old cast iron clean-out door (which I really liked) and just cemented their own clean-out for the new pipe. Oh well.
We will be running a completely new Class A chimney next to the old one because a new liner wouldn't fit and there is a perfect cavity (like a mini elevator shaft) that goes through the second floor to the attic.
 
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barnaclebob

Member
Nov 29, 2017
228
Puget Sound
Yesterday was the big day. Getting the stove home and off the trailer wasn't too difficult with a come-along but the original pallet looked like it was damaged in shipping and the shipping company put it on another full sized pallet which put a few kinks in our plans. This thing is heavy and two people could barely budge it on a slick steel trailer bed.

We had rented an electric stair climbing dolly but that wouldn't work with the larger pallet. In retrospect I should have just dragged the crate off of the new pallet but at the time decided that taking the stove apart to reduce its would be easier. The main concern was that the back end falling off might damage the stove. I could have put a 2x4 scrap underneath to step it down but hindsight is 20/20

Taking the top and side trim off the stove was easy enough but anything inside of that has some sealant applied to it and I didn't want to break those seals. But with the top, doors, bypass door, some interior soapstone panels, and glass removed it seemed barely light enough to lift up the stairs with 4 people. I went out and bought two sets of shoulder harness moving straps and started texting neighbors. Once the top of the stove is removed I think the main firebox is not attached to the base so put some ratchet straps around the whole thing to keep it together.

Me, my wife and two neighbors, equipped with two sets of shoulder dolly straps, were able to get it up the 6 stairs and onto the hearth with plenty of grunting. It would not have been possible without the shoulder dolly straps. We did put a couple small scratches in the side soapstone but there is probably some solution to make them less visible.

Anyway, my wife and I can get the final placement and reassembly done today and then it's time for the chimney install.

Oh, if you ever need to remove the glass you'll need a 12 pointM8 driver bit. That took a special trip and I had to buy a 100 piece set but now I must have every driver bit known to man.

20180507_215034.jpg 20180507_214957.jpg
You can see the scratches on the top left of the side panel in the above picture. I can live with them even if we can't reduce the appearance.

20180507_215005.jpg
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
79,115
South Puget Sound, WA
Can't really see the scratches in the picture. If they are light they might buff out with very fine 000 or 0000 steel wool.

Can you post a picture of the rear heat shield once it's installed?
 

barnaclebob

Member
Nov 29, 2017
228
Puget Sound
Can't really see the scratches in the picture. If they are light they might buff out with very fine 000 or 0000 steel wool.

Can you post a picture of the rear heat shield once it's installed?
Yeah that's what Woodstock recommended too. They are more prominent when viewed directly from the side but still not that bad.

Anything in particular you want to see on the rear heat shield? I've got to get that on first today so we can get the stove in its final position and verify the rear clearance.
 

bfitz3

Feeling the Heat
Jan 6, 2015
391
Northern Michigan
I miss the dog picture. It’s wonderful! I suppose it’s a small sacrifice for the PH install though. Happy burning!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
79,115
South Puget Sound, WA
Anything in particular you want to see on the rear heat shield? I've got to get that on first today so we can get the stove in its final position and verify the rear clearance.
Maybe a before and after mounting the shield on the air control side would be helpful to folks seeing the difference.
 

barnaclebob

Member
Nov 29, 2017
228
Puget Sound
Shes all put back together now. Here is a bunch of pics of the internals and some tips in case anyone else decides to shed some weight to move one of these beasts.

20180508_180901.jpg
Finished product. The color is charcoal, it looks blackish in some pics but that's just the lighting i guess. Didn't even need to shim one of the legs so I guess my hearth is flat enough.

20180508_180915.jpg
I could never find close ups of the details before I bought so here is one. I need to back the set screw (top center hole in the corner trim) out a little bit and tighten the threaded rods (pic of that below) so the top lines up with the side trim better.

20180508_180928.jpg
Emblem detail.

20180508_180755.jpg

Rufus gets to stay above the stove until the pipe gets installed, then he moves to another nearby wall.

20180508_160555.jpg

Under the hood.

20180508_163759.jpg

Bypass door closed.

20180508_163745.jpg

Bypass door open.

20180508_163940.jpg
Cat close up.

20180508_164522.jpg
Threaded rods that hold the top on. Tighten these last or you deform the whole thing and make it difficult to install the window or corner trim. Be very careful removing the window as the panes can fall out. There is a youtube video of how to replace the window, watch that first. But one difference from the video is that it looks like they started gluing the upper soapstone panel to the fire box so you don't need to worry about that falling out. Be careful though and don't assume any of the soapstone is glued on until you can verify it. You need an M8 12 point bit to remove the window surround.

20180508_160619.jpg
The cleanest the firebox will ever be. The back soapstone blocks can be removed by sliding them up and pulling from the bottom.

I have a before pic with the rear heat shield bit forgot to take an after. Ill do that and post a pic tomorrow.

The ash pan and heat shields went on with no problems and no extra wood support was needed. Just follow the directions and hold one end up, get a bolt or screw in, the do the same on the other end.

Now I have to wait until the end of may before I can light it up because the chimney guy is booked that far out.
 

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
79,115
South Puget Sound, WA
Here is the before and after of the air control and the rear heat shield. It's nothing special really, just a slot cut in the heat shield. The lever slightly rubs the heat shield but slighly bending the standoff spacers should have it lined up exactly.

View attachment 226559 View attachment 226560
Thanks. I'm surprised they sell the stove without the rear heat shield. It looks quite integral and cleans up the backside look. Not many folks are going to want to cope with a 36" rear clearance without the rear shield.

I'm also surprised they haven't replaced the brass hex-stock bypass handle. That cheapens the look on such a handsome stove. It's the first thing I'd replace.

PS: You folks did a nice job on the hearth. It looks great.