Sirocco 25 insert early observations

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Sweetlou

New Member
Sep 25, 2020
25
Timonium, Md
So 3 weeks into burning this has been a revelation. Today is the first really mild day since the install. But the furnace has been pretty much exclusively used to circulate air. Most of my splits are a bit on the long side so it's been more E/W loading than I was hoping for, but have managed to keep the slightly shorter splits for overnight packing the stove n/s.
Overnight burns have been great. High burns for 8-9 hours and medium around 12. Still dialing in everything and will keep working on packing wood in tighter and getting my hands on higher but wood, with some locust coming my way.
The appearance has inspired a few others to look at it for their fireplace and the performance has had some friends looking at new blaze kings to get better burn times.
Install had a few bumps on the west with delays in shipping from Washington then inclement weather, but finally with the existing stonework not providing for a flush mounting. Installer did a great job fabricating a steel plate surround to match the stock. Ended up looking great.
Will update as I get more experienced with it. Also will post a review in another month when I feel more experienced with it.
Only thing I'd like is the flush look with a larger firebox. The princess had been a non starter with my wife so very happy with my new insert. Definitely a huge difference with 5-7% moisture content to 14-16% though. Trying to mix and match on both types.

IMG_20201231_164843772.jpg
 

avsmusic1

Burning Hunk
Jul 26, 2012
218
CT
Sounds great so far and thanks for sharing
Would you say you're doing more hot burns (medium or higher?) than the real low and slow? Your glass seems doesn't seem to bad thus far.
How long do you have a visible fire if you have it cruising on medium?

Thanks!
 

Sweetlou

New Member
Sep 25, 2020
25
Timonium, Md
Sounds great so far and thanks for sharing
Would you say you're doing more hot burns (medium or higher?) than the real low and slow? Your glass seems doesn't seem to bad thus far.
How long do you have a visible fire if you have it cruising on medium?

Thanks!
I've been doing medium to high during the day to keep wife happy with extra heat and a bit more of a flame show. On medium I've kept flames going for a good 5-7 hours with the oak I've been burning (16-17 inches long, 4-6 inches thick, average of 10% MC). Heat continued for the rest of the 12 hour burn cycle I've been trying to keep. Overnight, I load around 9 PM, burn on high to about 10:30-11, then slowly move it down to a medium low to low. 9 AM reload (works with work/kid's school schedule) still have probably too much remaining wood/coals. I'll keep working with it, and may up it to medium airflow to keep things warmer and keep on schedule overall.

I've gone low and slow a few times just to see how that would work out, and had essentially a completely blacked out window with 2 different 18 hour plus burns. It immediately went away with the next High burn for a few good hours. I've been maintaining good temperatures for the top two floors (74-6 degrees on main floor, 70-71 upstairs totaling approximately 1400 square feet) during 20-35 degree days, and with the furnace recirculating air, the downstairs and finished basement have been pretty good as well (Mid to high 60s). Still waiting on the first gas and electric bill for year over year comparisons, but thus far, I'd be stunned if the bill wasn't a lot lower (despite it being colder this year so far on average)
 

avsmusic1

Burning Hunk
Jul 26, 2012
218
CT
I've been doing medium to high during the day to keep wife happy with extra heat and a bit more of a flame show. On medium I've kept flames going for a good 5-7 hours with the oak I've been burning (16-17 inches long, 4-6 inches thick, average of 10% MC). Heat continued for the rest of the 12 hour burn cycle I've been trying to keep. Overnight, I load around 9 PM, burn on high to about 10:30-11, then slowly move it down to a medium low to low. 9 AM reload (works with work/kid's school schedule) still have probably too much remaining wood/coals. I'll keep working with it, and may up it to medium airflow to keep things warmer and keep on schedule overall.

I've gone low and slow a few times just to see how that would work out, and had essentially a completely blacked out window with 2 different 18 hour plus burns. It immediately went away with the next High burn for a few good hours. I've been maintaining good temperatures for the top two floors (74-6 degrees on main floor, 70-71 upstairs totaling approximately 1400 square feet) during 20-35 degree days, and with the furnace recirculating air, the downstairs and finished basement have been pretty good as well (Mid to high 60s). Still waiting on the first gas and electric bill for year over year comparisons, but thus far, I'd be stunned if the bill wasn't a lot lower (despite it being colder this year so far on average)
Any chance you would be willing to post a picture of what the fire looks like after ~4hrs on medium or slightly lower? I've been chipping away at my wife on the ashford insert. Her only holding out cause of potential lack of visible fire/ambiance. How long is your chimney?
Thanks!
 
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Sweetlou

New Member
Sep 25, 2020
25
Timonium, Md
Any chance you would be willing to post a picture of what the fire looks like after ~4hrs on medium or slightly lower? I've been chipping away at my wife on the ashford insert. Her only holding out cause of potential lack of visible fire/ambiance. How long is your chimney?
Thanks!
working with a 14' chimney. I'll get the picture either late tonight (hopefully as it's a south facing room and will be washed out mid day for the picture) or tomorrow night, and I'll try and get a load in around 4pm tomorrow so I can show what it looks like at 8, 9, and 10pm for you.
 

avsmusic1

Burning Hunk
Jul 26, 2012
218
CT
working with a 14' chimney. I'll get the picture either late tonight (hopefully as it's a south facing room and will be washed out mid day for the picture) or tomorrow night, and I'll try and get a load in around 4pm tomorrow so I can show what it looks like at 8, 9, and 10pm for you.
whenever is convenient - certainly don't rush or do anything special for me, but I'm grateful in advance for anything you can snap a picture of
I suspect I'm not the only one who finds himself in this spot too so hopefully it'll help others pitching this option ;lol
 

Sweetlou

New Member
Sep 25, 2020
25
Timonium, Md
14" chimney is interesting, no smoke spillage on reloads?
I have had a very little bit, but have learned to turn fan off, open bypass, and wait about a minute, then crack door, wait another minute, then slowly open door the rest of the way. Been minimal spillage into the house, just enough to have the lovely scent
 

Poindexter

Minister of Fire
Jun 28, 2014
2,381
Fairbanks, Alaska
Looking forward to your ongoing observations. I have a really good feeling about that firebox even though it is on the small side for my envelope and climate.
 

Sweetlou

New Member
Sep 25, 2020
25
Timonium, Md
Looking forward to your ongoing observations. I have a really good feeling about that firebox even though it is on the small side for my envelope and climate.
It has been good. I had actually promised to give an update on bills etc. So, in short, it was nothing short of amazing. In 2019-20 we had an average bill of $276 when no one was home during the day from November - March, and keeping the house at around 70 degrees. In 2020-21 winter with our family of four at home all the time, we had the house at approximately 73 degrees on average, our gas and electric bill dropped to $70-80 per month for that time. There had also been an increase in the average cost for gas from 2019-20 season to 20-21 season from $0.38936 to $.42104 per therm or an 8% increase. Clearly not just a dollars and cents decision, as it has brought great joy already, and will for years to come, but I'm simply blown away by the savings year over year.
 

Sweetlou

New Member
Sep 25, 2020
25
Timonium, Md
Did you revisit adding an extension on the chimney to get better draft? I bet you could turn the insert down even more with that added to it.
We've had several other projects this year. I was trying one more season with what I know is truly seasoned wood as I believe that was a big issue last season. After the season I'll assess it and decide if I should go to an extension.

I am interested to see draft improvement with better wood, but will likely be not as good as if I added that extension. So, suggestion is 2-3 feet more?
 

Sweetlou

New Member
Sep 25, 2020
25
Timonium, Md
BK recommends 16ft minimum of insulated 6" liner, and if you can go any higher it would only get better till 25ft when you start to see overdrafting on certain setups.
Will look at adding at least 2 feet then. Should be great this season coming up. Definitely been looking at the stove daydreaming of cold weather
 

mellow

Resident Stove Connoisseur
Jan 19, 2008
5,257
Salisbury, MD
I had to go back and check the manual, it is 15ft minimum, but I have seen some have issues with that height, when they add another couple feet the issues go away. Do you have an insulated liner?

ROLE OF THE CHIMNEY
Without a proper installed chimney, this appliance will not burn correctly. The role of the chimney is to pull the proper amount of air into the fi rebox for the purpose of complete combustion. Incomplete combustion will lead to more smoke and pollution of the outside air. A proper operating chimney will allow the user to enjoy peak performance at all burn operating levels from low to high. Blaze King therefore recommends vertical installations with a minimum length of 15’ from appliance top to chimney cap. In insert applications Blaze King recommends insulated liners into all existing chimneys
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,759
South Puget Sound, WA
I am interested to see draft improvement with better wood, but will likely be not as good as if I added that extension. So, suggestion is 2-3 feet more?
MD has milder weather. The draft will be weaker when burning at >45º temps. Additional height and an insulated liner will both help improve draft and reduce buildup by keeping the flue gases hotter.
 

Sweetlou

New Member
Sep 25, 2020
25
Timonium, Md
MD has milder weather. The draft will be weaker when burning at >45º temps. Additional height and an insulated liner will both help improve draft and reduce buildup by keeping the flue gases hotter.
Yeah, The liner is insulated, was something I insisted on after having read your posts before getting it installed. Have lined the firebox as well with Roxul with the idea of covering it later with the board like you had. Will call to see what It would be to extend by 2 ft. Don't think the wife would be alright with the extra 3 feet due to looks, but one step at a time. It shouldn't be too costly.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,759
South Puget Sound, WA
Give it a try and see how it works. There is this option for an extension too.
www.extendaflue.com
 

Poindexter

Minister of Fire
Jun 28, 2014
2,381
Fairbanks, Alaska
I ended up fooling with my chimney height a couple or three times.

In really cold weather my A30 runs just fine at wide open throttle on a factory minimum stack height. In shoulder season I need height to turn the stove down to run on low.