Storing Pellets in proximity to Stove

pellets_idk

New Member
Dec 24, 2016
1
Bearsville
Hey there,

Relatively new to the pellet stove scene and I can't find this info online. I have 2 tons of pellets and no interior space to store them all, so I took 2 weeks worth of pellets inside and tightly tarped the rest outside. The only real place to store them is about 1 foot away from my stove, a Breckwell Sonora SP23. They are stored on the side, not in the path of the blower, but I worry that it is too close. When I woke up this morning after leaving them overnight one or two of the bags is a very little bit warmer..

Is there any danger here? Can the pellets combust, or the bags melt? Unaware of how much radiant heat the stove puts out..
 

Tails1

Feeling the Heat
Nov 19, 2016
281
Ajax, Ontario Canada
Hey there,

Relatively new to the pellet stove scene and I can't find this info online. I have 2 tons of pellets and no interior space to store them all, so I took 2 weeks worth of pellets inside and tightly tarped the rest outside. The only real place to store them is about 1 foot away from my stove, a Breckwell Sonora SP23. They are stored on the side, not in the path of the blower, but I worry that it is too close. When I woke up this morning after leaving them overnight one or two of the bags is a very little bit warmer..

Is there any danger here? Can the pellets combust, or the bags melt? Unaware of how much radiant heat the stove puts out..
Can you put your hand there on the bags comfortably even after running on high? I have a tonne and a half right now serving as furniture in my living room as I haven't built a storage yet. Personally I wouldn't keep them quite that close. What does the manual for your stove state for clearances to combustibles? That's the bottom line and if the bags are closer than that then you should move them.
 
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Deezl Smoke

Feeling the Heat
Nov 28, 2015
463
Oregon
Ya, look in the manual and see what it says about distance from combustibles. Pellet stoves are unique in their placement to walls etc. But I have a fear of things too close to fire. My pallets of pellets are 100 yards away from the house. I use a pneumatic tire hand truck to haul 2 bags at a time to the house. This way the space needed is minimal and they can be kept a little further from the stove. Though I dont want to put them too awful far away.

Where there is a will, there is a way. So take a minute and have a good look at what you can change to make some room.
 

alternativeheat

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2013
3,797
Cape Cod, Ma.
Hey there,

Relatively new to the pellet stove scene and I can't find this info online. I have 2 tons of pellets and no interior space to store them all, so I took 2 weeks worth of pellets inside and tightly tarped the rest outside. The only real place to store them is about 1 foot away from my stove, a Breckwell Sonora SP23. They are stored on the side, not in the path of the blower, but I worry that it is too close. When I woke up this morning after leaving them overnight one or two of the bags is a very little bit warmer..

Is there any danger here? Can the pellets combust, or the bags melt? Unaware of how much radiant heat the stove puts out..
Out under the tarp sounds pretty safe. Mine are outdoors, I bring in what I need as I need them, daily. I might have half a bag next to the stove that didn't fit in that morning or evening, about 3 ft away. When the hopper burns down enough I put them in. But then I don't mind and rather like getting out for a breath of fresh air.. If it's going to be stormy I tend to bring in 4 bags that should last the duration of the storm. With my P61 you would not have any question if you would store them a foot away or not, being "aware" of how much radiant heat there is is very obvious, it's quite a lot. Not all stoves are this way, some are even heavily shrouded. You won't find any cats sleeping on top of a P series stove, it's just plain too hot for that and IMO, too hot to be storing any quantity of pellets a foot away but I really don't think I'd do that with any stove actually.
 

Deromax

Burning Hunk
Jun 13, 2014
168
Shawinigan, Pq, Canada
IMHO, if the bags are only lukewarm, there is no fire hazard. However, I'd be cautious about a child or pet managing to tumble the pile if it's unstable, which may now become in direct contact with the stove.
 

bags

Minister of Fire
Oct 12, 2014
2,397
Kentucky
As mentioned above: Check clearances. I'm not familiar with your stove but I put mine close by and the P68 throws tons of radiant heat from the sides. That said, I do not have them touching and they are at the rear which is cool to the touch.

Check clearances and mainly use common sense. If the bags are cool or just slightly warm you are likely OK. I would leave some space from the stove regardless even if the sides are cool.
 
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bogieb

Minister of Fire
Oct 31, 2014
2,792
South Central NH
The pellets I store in my basement have to be 2 feet away from my P61a to be outside the clearance zone. So, whatever the clearance for your stove is the minimum that should apply. If you are outside the clearance area and it still makes you nervous, find a way to get them or put up a piece of material that is a heat break for them.
 
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Tonyray

Minister of Fire
The pellets I store in my basement have to be 2 feet away from my P61a to be outside the clearance zone. So, whatever the clearance for your stove is the minimum that should apply. If you are outside the clearance area and it still makes you nervous, find a way to get them or put up a piece of material that is a heat break for them.
I keep a bag or 2 about 3 feet from the stove.
nothing to worry about. but, I do have the accessory shields on both sides..
 

Attachments

doghouse

Feeling the Heat
Dec 9, 2008
454
maine
I usually keep a bag with out the plastic inside the stove. I've found its the best place for storing pellets.
 

GeHmTS

Feeling the Heat
Nov 29, 2013
412
Massachusetts
Yep, that seems pretty close to me, no they shouldn't combust unless you accidentally get fly ash on them or something like that. Bags can melt and/or burn depending on the material. Be smart and get them at least 3 feet from the fire. If you're not sure, call your local fire department for advice as well as consulting your manual. After all, they'll be the ones showing up if you do manage to start a fire.
 

mudeprived

Burning Hunk
Oct 9, 2016
157
SW PA
You could get one of those deck boxes or storage sheds and park it on your porch or next to the back door.

I have mine stored in the basement and stove is upstairs. I plan on placing a deck box on the porch to hold 10 bags or so. The reason for that is because it allows me to open the front door and let cold air in, which cools down the living room a bit. It gets HOT in there.

What do you live in? I'm curious why the only available space is next to the stove.
 

greg13

Minister of Fire
Jan 5, 2012
907
CNY
I use a deck box, If you stack them right you can get 15 bags in it.
 

glockshooter

Member
Jan 2, 2010
77
Wilkes-Barre PA
Coming from a firefighter who has seen people do crazy things with their wood burning stoves.....that's too close. I don't know what your side clearances are with that stove, but I wouldn't do it.
 
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CapeMayDan

Member
Mar 21, 2015
31
Cape May County
Hey there,

Relatively new to the pellet stove scene and I can't find this info online. I have 2 tons of pellets and no interior space to store them all, so I took 2 weeks worth of pellets inside and tightly tarped the rest outside.
Is there any danger here? Can the pellets combust, or the bags melt? Unaware of how much radiant heat the stove puts out..
Your stoves clearance to combustibles is 9" for Freestanding SP23. I Think your OK at 12" but it is always good to have a little more.

Lots of people store their pellets outdoors including me. Here are some things I learned about outside storage.
Never accept a pallet that is not factory wrapped unless you know 100% that they were stored inside, even then be careful.
Always tarp the the top, which could leak. The sides should be OK if factory wrapped for 2 or 3 seasons but keep an eye on them. It won't last forever. If you can tarp the whole pallet, that is best.
If you have to re stack, do it the same as the factory. Elevate off the ground, 3 bags on the left, 2 on the right and then the next layer, 2 on the left, 3 on the right etc. Stacking in this manner will cover the vents on the bags and keep moisture out.
Humidity can accumulate on the bags due to fluctuations in the temperature. It,s not a big deal.
The top row vents are exposed. Take a rag dry them off, set them by the stove. They will be good overnight.

Enjoy the warmth.
Dan
 
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Pete Zahria

Minister of Fire
Jan 6, 2014
1,144
New Hampster
mcmanusfuels.com
The stove people do not want to see you burn your house down using their stove.
If they say "X" from the side, then use that... They are already using a slush factor...
I keep some close to my shop stove, and the bags never get "hot"...

Dan
 

womaus

Feeling the Heat
Oct 25, 2015
498
Central MA
I usually keep a bag with out the plastic inside the stove. I've found its the best place for storing pellets.
So you take the plastic off of the bag? Huh...

Damn. I learn something new here everyday.

Doesn't that affect the BTUs?
 

doghouse

Feeling the Heat
Dec 9, 2008
454
maine
So you take the plastic off of the bag? Huh...
Oh I don't take the plastic off of the bags, my De-Frumpalizer Model 45-AST 7845 B, second generation bag removal machine does. The De-Frumpalizer manages to keep the pellets in tact prior to storage. The De-Frumpalizer is manufactured to the exacting standards as set forth by the Hillbilly Institute of Technology.
 

Tim Linden

Burning Hunk
Dec 28, 2012
137
Rhode Island
I stored mine outside until a cat used it as a scratching post. Now they go in the garage! I lost a lot of pellets to moisture from the holes :(

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

jp99

Burning Hunk
Jan 7, 2015
150
Ohio
If you feel they are too warm put some aluminum foil on them. That will reflect the radiant heat and keep them cooler. Simple solution if you can't move them farther away.