Stove paint Q&A

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brettdacosta

Member
Jan 8, 2017
30
Middle Tennessee
I'm looking to paint our stove strictly to change the color.

The 4 main options I've found are...
- Stove bright (http://forrestpaint.com/stove-bright/)
- Thurmalox (http://www.stovepaint.com)
- TemperKote / Flame control (http://www.temperkote.com/product-catalog)
- Rustoleum (home depot / Lowe's)

First is to pick the color. Found at least one option for each of the 4.

Next is to pick the application method (brush on versus aerosol). That limited selection to significantly to the Thurmalox and TemperKote.

I liked the prices of the Thurmalox, but the TemperKote has the number one color in my wife's book (light grey). It only comes in gallons and is ~$150/gal (hoping to split that with some friends that may want to paint theirs).

However, my question comes from the fact I've never heard of TemperKote. There are zero results from a search for the word on Hearth, and even the entire internet can only return minimal results for TemperKote. I called them, but in typical new york fashion, they weren't the most in even answering where I could buy the stuff. Which didn't give me the feeling they'd help if the product didn't turn out the best or if I had follow up questions.

They did suggest the 1000 model, because the 1200 model needed to be baked on, but they didn't give many details past that. The 1000 model is rated to 1200 which is confusing.

Just wondering if any of you guys had thoughts/opinions. Feel free to share.

Thanks,
 
I've only ever used stove bright aerosol and imo it works just fine. Tape the part of the stove you dont want paint on, put some cardboard etc on the floor and have at it.
 
I work in an industrial blast/paint shop and I can't imagine a brush/roll application looking that great on a stove unless you thinned it and it flowed nicely. But still, it's hard to beat a spray application. And I mean with a spray gun, not a spray can. Although I do think you'd still be better off with a spray can than brushing and rolling.

What is currently on your stove right now as far as coating?
 
Stove Bright is the most common paint, most manufacturers use it on stoves. The spray cans lay down a nice coating, you can also get various patten spray tips. I can't imagine brushing or rolling a stove. I've repainted dozens of stoves with great success spraying.
 
I work in an industrial blast/paint shop and I can't imagine a brush/roll application looking that great on a stove unless you thinned it and it flowed nicely. But still, it's hard to beat a spray application. And I mean with a spray gun, not a spray can. Although I do think you'd still be better off with a spray can than brushing and rolling.

What is currently on your stove right now as far as coating?

Yeah. That's what a lot of people are saying. I would have probably apply it with a foam brush and definitely put it on thin. The brush/roll-on style is just so much more paint for you money.

Here's a picture of the stove (and me after cutting out the damper and cleaning the smoke shelf). It's just the standard paint that comes on a stove - in pretty nice shape. We're just hoping to change the color.
 

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Should be easy enough, I was thinking it could be a pain getting proper adhesion of the new paint if the stove was already enameled with some other color.
 
The only thing I have done is the cheap spray can of off the shelf stuff. It worked just fine, but I needed 3 coats to get it really uniform looking.
 
I do plan on roughing the existing paint up with steel wool or a scotch bright pad to help the paint stick better.

Thanks for the responses. Has anyone had any luck with the brush/roll-on type?

And for those that have painted their stoves, how have the paint held up over time? How long can I expect from a paint job?

Thanks,
 
I always paint over the old paint. It sticks fine. I just sand it down if needed and hit it with a tack cloth or microfiber.

Careful using anything too course, the marks will show through the new paint job.
 
If it were me I'd probably prime it first. Primers will fill in imperfections and give you a better layer to top coat over. They also tend to adhere to a less than ideal surface better, and the top coat adheres to the primer better.

If you went the Rusto spray can route, just make sure it's high heat paint. I assume the other brands listed already are.