Tesla Model 3 Parked in Our Garage

jebatty Posted By jebatty, Mar 25, 2019 at 7:32 PM

  1. jebatty

    jebatty
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    The Tesla AutoPilot amazes me. The narrow two lane highway that I travel the most is recognized as one of the curviest highways in MN, with many curve speed signs at 30 mph and even 15 mph. Most other stretches are driven well at 40-45 mph maximm. I set the Tesla speed at 45 mph maximum, and it navigated this highway perfectly on AutoPilot, handled the curves well, and slowing as necessary and then resuming speed.
     
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  2. wilsoncm1

    wilsoncm1
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    Tesla makes a neat product, but will they be around in 10 years to support it? Also, they just don't fit my lifestyle. It won't make it up my driveway anytime nor will it take me to work with 12" of snow. I'll be waiting for the Jeep plugin when it's released next year or the year after.

    Building my solar system this Spring. Can't wait!
     
  3. Ashful

    Ashful
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    Why wouldn’t they make it up your driveway? Their AWD snow performance is far better than any 4x4 pickup I have owned.

    No doubt, Tesla is here to stay, they have set the standard for EVs.

    Jeep??? Really?!? Good luck with that!
     
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  4. wilsoncm1

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    Because I already need a Jeep to make it up the last 1/4 mile. Some of us don't live in the city or on a paved road. 2 miles from the paved road and 1000' elevation change just to get to my drive.

    According to reports, Tesla is in trouble. We'll see what happens.

    Jeep will let others develop the tech and apply it to their suvs. Thanks Tesla!
     
  5. lsucet

    lsucet
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    Tesla is in trouble no more or less than any other manufacturer regardless which technology is in use. Sometimes is more internet Bla Bla bla than anything else. Many manufacturers are in trouble
    with emissions, safety recalls etc. At the end of the day they find their way around. They are way far away from Tesla on EV vehicles and technologies. There is a market for everything, and those with Teslas, not many want to go back. Of course it has some limitations if that is not what makes the job for you but like any other products they always getting better and better.
     
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  6. SpaceBus

    SpaceBus
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    I would love to see a plug in diesel hybrid four door/extended cab wrangler pickup truck, but I don't see that happening.
     
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  7. wilsoncm1

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    Minus the diesel, I think we're going to get there in a year or so.
    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a26882354/2020-jeep-wrangler-hybrid-future-spied/

    A 30-40 mi range on electrons would fit my commute perfectly. The dino juice engine would allow real cross country travel if needed. If it's halfway affordable, I'm in.
     
  8. begreen

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    I suspected they would borrow parts of the Pacifica Hybrid drive train. The Pacifica H is 2wd, so it will be interesting to see if they are working on a 4WD or AWD version.
     
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  9. wilsoncm1

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    In the Wrangler, it'll have to be 4WD. The smaller/not real Jeeps will probably be ICE front wheel and electric rear wheel. At least that's the scuttlebutt.
     
  10. jebatty

    jebatty
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    Just crossed the 2000 mile mark on the Tesla Model 3 and five weeks of driving. I've never owned a genuine sports car, yet I have a feeling that the handling of the 3 must be close: firm, exact, and fully controlled, with exhilarating acceleration that is difficult to understand for a person used to the sluggish ICE performance. Had a little fun last weekend when a caravan of four Porche car plus two American muscle cars slowly passed me on the interstate. I gradually regained my position, they in the left lane and me in the right lane, one of the muscle car drivers rev'd the engine in an expression of power, I pressed the accelerator pedal, didn't even floor it, and the Tesla "exploded" forward. Enough said.

    Back to the Tesla itself. Have not noticed any cosmetic defects. Have had 0 mechanical issues. All systems appear to be operating as intended. Still getting used to the positions of the various controls, not difficult, just different. Have received one OTA software update related to the Summons and Navigate features, plus a 5% increase in power. Have not yet tried the Navigate on Autopilot, but I do use Autopilot frequently, including lane change and adaptive cruise.

    The Tesla is my wife's car, and she drives it mostly on local roads to and from nearby towns. My driving has been mostly highway/freeway driving, including a couple of trips to Minneapolis/St. Paul. We charge typically to 150 mile range for the daily use to meet my wife's needs, and to 270+/- miles (about a 90% charge) for trip driving. Did charge once fully, and the Tesla reported 306 miles of range. The full charge does not allow immediate regenerative operation, as the battery has no additional capacity, so a full charge is somewhat wasteful.

    All home charging, except once, has been on a 240V-16A circuit in our garage. When my wife gets home, she drives in the garage and plugs in the Tesla on the J1772 adapter plug that comes with the car. That allows 12-14 miles per hour of charge. We did charge once on the 240V-30A circuit in my shop, using the NEMA 14-50 outlet and the 14-50 adapter that also comes with the car, as well as the J1772 plug.

    We also have used SuperChargers several times on our trips to/from visit our children in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area. Fortunately, there currently are three available on this route, one 40 miles from where we live, another 115 miles, and the third in a St. Paul suburb at 180 miles. Using the SuperCharger could not be easier: grab the charge plug cord, press the button on the plug, the Tesla charge port opens, plug it in, and let her rip. Initial charging I noticed at over 100 kW rate, vs 7,200W on the 30A circuit in my shop. On our Bolt I've seen DC Fast Charge at about 18,000W.

    A few creature comforts. Front driver seat, steering wheel, and side mirrors all programmable for separate drivers. Side mirrors automatically fold in when approaching the garage, and fold out upon leaving the garage. Also fold in when parked. Display screen on the dash is very easy to use, once a person gets used to it. Touchscreen is accurate and fast. Navigation display and voice info is crystal clear. Excellent sound system, voice commands, and navigation.

    I have not thought of any "wished the Tesla had ..." features. We did splurge in getting the top-end Model 3, but this is my wife's first new car ever. She deserved getting exactly what she wanted. And neither she nor I have not been left wanting. At this point the Tesla rates 10 out of 10, or even 11 out of 10.
     
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  11. semipro

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    Vehicle to grid capability for emergency power or peak metering pricing maybe?
    I realize you have solar PV but maybe still somehow useful?
     
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  12. woodgeek

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    Awesome Jim.

    FWIW, I was routinely hitting 44kW DCFC on my Bolt (about 150 mph charging speed). :cool:

    You just need better DCFCs.
     
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  13. jebatty

    jebatty
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    The DCFC I used is Greenlots and is the most convenient for me on travels to/from Minneapolis/St.Paul, mostly because a ChargePoint site is a little further down the road, just in case the Greenlots is out of service. There are numerous other DCFC in the Mpls/St. Paul area.

    Just used the Tesla trip planner for our trip to Colorado Springs next week. The longest leg between SCs is 160 miles. Total miles = 1179. Conservative and leaves lots of room for reduced range due to speed, wind, temperature, and other adverse driving conditions.
     
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  14. SpaceBus

    SpaceBus
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    Perhaps soon range anxiety will be a thing of the past.
     
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  15. wilsoncm1

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    Assuming that you have the full 300mi charge, that's 4 stops for charging. How long will this trip take you with charging stops?
     
  16. jebatty

    jebatty
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    Tesla trip planner recommends total charging time of 310 minutes at the eight stops between our home and Colorado Springs. First day planned miles is 546, second day 350, and 3rd day arrival at destination 283, for total one-way miles of 1179, nearly all on Interstate highways. Two motel nights. With this driving plan there will be no range anxiety at all.

    This daily mileage is in the same range as most of our past driving trips with our ICE car. We enjoy casual lunch stops and a leisurely evening meal and relaxing time at the end of the day. When I was much younger, like 35 years ago, and with three children we made non-stop driving trips up to about 1500 miles, like 26 hours from our home in MN to visit my brother in Boston. A 12-pack of Coke and bags of Cheetos would keep me awake. Probably was foolish to have done that at the time, and certainly not want I want to do anymore at my much riper age.
     
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  17. begreen

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    I'm impressed that this can be done in CO away from the Boulder/Denver corridor. This is a big change in the past 5 yrs. Where will the car be charged each day and night? At a Tesla super-station, DC charger on the interstate, motel 120v?
     
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  18. jebatty

    jebatty
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    All Tesla SC: Clearwater and Albert Lea, MN; West Des Moines and Council Bluffs, IA; Grand Island, Gothenberg, and Ogallala, NE; Brush and Colorado Springs, CO.
     
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  19. jebatty

    jebatty
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    Returned home this afternoon after completing a round-trip to/from Colorado Springs; total of 2,348 miles in the Tesla Model 3. All charging on the route was at SuperChargers, shortest distance between charging was 88 miles, longest was 176 miles. No charging site was full, most Teslas at any site was 3 including us. Sites had 6-8 charging stations. Only one station was out of service.

    There is an advantage to keeping charging episodes to about 150 miles. That advantage is faster charging at higher battery capacity. At high available capacity charge rates would be 100 to about 130 kW, slowing to about 30 kW as the battery moved to full charge. A charge stop often was no more than the time to stop, plug in, visit a restroom, maybe pickup a snack, stretch the legs, unplug and take off.

    I would typically charge to stated range about 50% higher than actual distance to account for low temperatures, strong headwinds, need for cabin heat or air conditioning, and steady travel speeds up to 75 mph. So, if distance to the next charging station was 160 miles, I would charge to stated range of about 240 miles. This practice was dramatized on our travel to the second charge site on our trip, a distance of 149 miles. I charged to a range of 200 miles. Outside temperature was in the high 30's - low 40's, very strong headwinds, and heavy rain. And then an unexpected detour which required 14 miles of additional travel. Made it to the charge station with 18 miles of range left. Quickly learned that it is not wise to plan to tightly on charge capacity.

    Tesla performance -- outstanding! Absolutely no issues of substance with the car at all. Navigation was right on, save for two charge stations that weren't quite where navigation stated. A quick re-navigate solved the problem. Visibility between the rear view mirror, side mirrors, and LED screen showing position of nearby vehicles was excellent. Freeway merges were a snap, due first to the excellent visibility and then also due to the powerful acceleration to merge into an open space. Passing other vehicles was just as easy for the same reasons. Cruise holds speed exactly, adaptive cruise maintained set distance to the car ahead and slowed or accelerated as needed without any intervention at all.

    Enhanced AutoPilot made freeway travel, even travel on two lane roads, very relaxing. Set cruise speed, engage EAP, and the result is easy, non-tiring travel. Lane changes were right on. Most of our trip involved very strong cross and head winds, which sometimes buffeted semi-trucks half way into the adjacent lane. Without EAP, keeping the Tesla in the lane would have been a constant, fatiguing and sometimes anxious effort. EAP maintained the Tesla closer to the center of the lane than I could have done manually.

    As best as I could tell, EAP disengages were the fault of heavy rain limiting visibility, or the absence of a clear lane marker or edge of pavement stripe, or error on my part in failing to keep my hands on the steering wheel, or me inadvertently taking control of the steering wheel when EAP was doing just fine. It took a few episodes of disengaging to get the knack of quickly taking over manual handling on disengagement. But never a safety issue, just a slight jerk or two in making the transition. And after a bit of experience, no more than a barely noticeable change in movement of the car.

    Cabin comfort is excellent, the sound system is great, and the Tesla is quiet with very little wind noise. Ride is firm, good feel of the road through the suspension and steering wheel, superb handling, and all in all six very enjoyable days of travel, averaging just under 400 miles/day.

    After this trip we now have over 4,000 miles on the Tesla in less than two months. Not 1 drop of gasoline, not one pound of CO2, and with the massive wind turbine farms in NW Iowa and central Colorado east of Denver/Colorado Springs, probably very little if any coal fired electricity.
     
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  20. Ashful

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    I’m really enjoying this thread, jebatty. Keep on keeping on! Here’s to hoping Tesla considers doing a sports wagon in the near future.
     
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  21. SpaceBus

    SpaceBus
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    Are power slides and donuts still the same? Call me whatever you want, but sometimes I still like to do teenager stuff with my vehicles. Always in a safe place of course.
     
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  22. begreen

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    Sounds like a great trip in a great car. It's interesting that you felt the EAP did a great job at dealing with the strong crosswinds. I hadn't thought of that benefit.

    FWIW, Colorado is decreasing dependence on coal, but mostly by moving to natural gas. Overall, it is a fossil fuel powered state. Kansas OTOH has really been adding wind power.

    Screen Shot 2019-05-15 at 6.54.33 PM.png
    https://www.eia.gov/state/?sid=CO#tabs-3
     
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  23. jebatty

    jebatty
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    Can't answer this, not my driving style. Can say that the first time I hit the accelerator hard, I was pushed back against the seat as though I was a passenger in a jet on takeoff. Have never before had that feeling in a car, not even from my long gone 1972 Chevelle SS with a 454 hp engine.
     
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  24. Ashful

    Ashful
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    I can speak to this, not the donuts, but the acceleration. A 1972 454 SS was rated at only 270 hp, and had an 8 second 0-60 time, almost long enough to take a nap while you waited for it to reach speed. It made a lot of exciting noise in the process, and is one heck of a beautiful car, but it’s not a very good comparison to anything made today.

    The two Tesla cars I have driven were both insanely quick off the line, 0 - 30 mph. Almost violently quick, with pedal response time that could not replicated by any ICE. However, the 30 - 60 mph acceleration was no faster than the big overweight sedan I drive to work everyday, and 60+ mph highway passing performance of both Tesla’s was unimpressive. Any decent ICE high performance sedan will take them at 0 - 100 mph, and will completely smoke them in highway passing. This becomes more relevant, as they’re raising a lot of our local freeway speeds from 55 mph to 65 and even 75 mph.

    These were not base model 3’s, but one was a model 3 with dual motor and AWD options. The other was a P90D. Both great cars, until you consider the price tag. The Model 3 I drove was $65k, and it was as nice as any other $50k car I have driven, there is a high price on that industry-leading R&D.

    This doesn’t make them less desirable, just pointing out the pros and cons, as honestly as I can. For those who want the latest tech, they present an attractive package.
     
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  25. SpaceBus

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    Yeah, that 454 stock might have done a 14 second 1/4, but it didn't take much to go faster. Mfgs were hamstrung in making fast cars and often included headers, intake manis, and carbs in the trunk to wake them up. Honestly tough, I'm not risk adverse enough to own a fast car anymore. I just want to be able to slide and have fun. You don't need a million HP to do that.
    Back to topic, has anyone that goes to performance driving events taken a Tesla (acceleration times are just one part of the picture)? How are they at the limits, steering tip in, brake modulation, abs lockup, etc? The biggest fear for me as far as EVs is the visceral feedback given by the car. Even my 8,000 lb Dually truck talks to me.
     
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