Timber Tuff sharpener

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NickW

Minister of Fire
Oct 16, 2019
641
SE WI
Sorry if this has been addressed, but I didn't find any old threads...

I was given a Timber Tuff bench top sharpener for Christmas - the CS-BMM model. It comes with a 3/16 grinding wheel and the manual sucks, so I did some research and found some videos about it. Wondering if anyone can confirm my suspicion?

I run a Husky with .325 .058 chain. Started with an older chain that didn't have a lot left so if I wrecked it no biggie. Used the 3/16 wheel down to almost hitting the link, rakers are down, cuts worse than before. I suspect I need a 1/8" wheel. Seems like I don't get past the radius on the wheel edge to get a proper sharpening. Not finding much clear direction on it. Manual and video refer to DIY vs professional chains, but doesn't distinguish what the criteria is. It seems like 3/8" and bigger should use the 3/16" wheel and anything smaller should use the 1/8" wheel. Why would a cheap little sharpener come with the bigger "pro" wheel instead of the DIY size? Also, the video and manual talk about 30 and 35 degree cutting angles, but these chains seem to be 25 degrees. Even checked a brand new chain.
 

NickW

Minister of Fire
Oct 16, 2019
641
SE WI
So an update... I got a 3/8" Stihl chain from my brother and it sharpened beautifully.

Note... said brother is the gifter. I don't think it was intentional that the gift as given only sharpens his chains but not mine; but if I were more cynical I would be more suspicious.;hm
 
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jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
5,308
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
Check the grinding instructions from the appropriate chain manufacturer before grinding. They will specify file/stone size. (Usually anything smaller than 3/8 pitch chain takes a 1/8" stone, but go ahead and look it up anyway. You'll also learn the recommended angles for the chain.)

Most grinders end up picking angles that they like and using them on every brand. I do 55/30/0 for semichisel and 55/30/10 for full chisel. Lots of people just do 60/30/0 for everything. (Try both, see what cuts better for you.)

Husky is extra tricky as far as identifying their chains. They were always Oregon chains with HUSQV stamped on them until recently, but they apparently make their own now.


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