Wood burning stove newbie..

Apr 30, 2021
29
CT
Good afternoon everyone,

I had a question, we have just put an order in for a new VC Aspen C3. We have a raised ranch and are supplementing the oil heating. Our home is spray foam insulated in the attic and around the entire home.
My question is, can kiln dried firewood be placed outside? If so, how do we protect it and ensure that it's good enough for burning? Thank ye kindly!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,344
South Puget Sound, WA
Welcome and congratulations. Yes, the wood can be stored outdoors. It should be stacked off the ground and top-covered. There is a lot of info on everything to do with firewood in the Wood Shed forum here:

 
Apr 30, 2021
29
CT
Welcome and congratulations. Yes, the wood can be stored outdoors. It should be stacked off the ground and top-covered. There is a lot of info on everything to do with firewood in the Wood Shed forum here:

Thank you so very much. I appreciate it.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,344
South Puget Sound, WA
You're welcome. Keep us posted on how the Aspen C3 works out for you next season. There is a lot of interest in this model.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,344
South Puget Sound, WA
It is a major revision that now includes a thermostatic damper system. It also has a more robust secondary air system. The C3 is not catalytic but burns clean enough to qualify for the 26% tax credit. Here is more information on the C3 technology, developed by hearth.com member Corie.
 

nortcan

Burning Hunk
Sep 9, 2016
233
Quebec
It is a major revision that now includes a thermostatic damper system. It also has a more robust secondary air system. The C3 is not catalytic but burns clean enough to qualify for the 26% tax credit. Here is more information on the C3 technology, developed by hearth.com member Corie.
Seems to me that the air wash for the glass comes from the bottom of the door, that is different from what we are used to see on some other stoves. Did you get some review from some owners of the VC-C3 ? Anyway the stove looks to be a well made and non complicated made stove.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,344
South Puget Sound, WA
Like most 2020 compliant stoves, it's new this year, so only a few reviews and comments so far. It's a small stove, so best for smaller spaces and supplemental heating. The prior design of the Aspen was ok but not great.

That's a good observation about the air wash. It may be worth asking Corie that question.
 
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nortcan

Burning Hunk
Sep 9, 2016
233
Quebec
Like most 2020 compliant stoves, it's new this year, so only a few reviews and comments so far. It's a small stove, so best for smaller spaces and supplemental heating. The prior design of the Aspen was ok but not great.

That's a good observation about the air wash. It may be worth asking Corie that question.
Me again and again an other question about the Aspen C3, according to what I saw on VC documentations, the T. air control has no manual device to set the stove's temperature, very unique but how to do if for some reasons we want less or more heat like outside temp. changes, wind, less or more insulated houses...but according to the same documentations the Aspen looks to be a nice option to consider...
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,013
central pa
Me again and again an other question about the Aspen C3, according to what I saw on VC documentations, the T. air control has no manual device to set the stove's temperature, very unique but how to do if for some reasons we want less or more heat like outside temp. changes, wind, less or more insulated houses...but according to the same documentations the Aspen looks to be a nice option to consider...
They did it because it makes the engineering much easier
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,344
South Puget Sound, WA
The user controls the amount of heat generated by the amount of fuel added.
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
844
Massachusetts
The user controls the amount of heat generated by the amount of fuel added.
Pretty similar to the Quadrafire Expedition II a friend of mine just got.

What do people think of this style or lack of manual combustion control? Can you get equally long burn times as traditionally controlled stoves? I haven't tried it but I feel like I'd really dislike giving up the air control. Sure most of the time I'm setting and forgetting my Osburn 1600 after 15 mins once it's cruising but there are definitely times I futz with the air based on the wood, both in/outside temps, if I'm leaving the house etc. I could see it not working as well with sub par wood. But again not having tried it this is pure speculation.

I guess it's just like the manual/automatic car thing. The manufacturer will say removing the user control increases efficiency but us purists like the control and fun of the manual.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,742
07462
Firewood is the easy part here, expect to burn approx 4 cords per season, a cord is 4x4x8ft or 128cuft. The new stove installed in a house with spray foam insulation is screaming outside air connection needed, check with the dealer and see if the stove comes with an OAK adapter or if a static fresh air intake is needed, as the fire burns it will use the inside air of the house to feed itself, if you dont have the right controls in place you will have a hard time getting the fire going, possible smoke issues when you open the door and low fire box temps which could be confused with burning wet wood symptoms. OAK's need to be piped as to be no higher then the stove it self, this way it can be ruled out as a secondary chimney should the your flue get blocked.
If you have any questions, please feel free to ask on this thread, many great experienced people here that can offer help.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,013
central pa
Pretty similar to the Quadrafire Expedition II a friend of mine just got.

What do people think of this style or lack of manual combustion control? Can you get equally long burn times as traditionally controlled stoves? I haven't tried it but I feel like I'd really dislike giving up the air control. Sure most of the time I'm setting and forgetting my Osburn 1600 after 15 mins once it's cruising but there are definitely times I futz with the air based on the wood, both in/outside temps, if I'm leaving the house etc. I could see it not working as well with sub par wood. But again not having tried it this is pure speculation.

I guess it's just like the manual/automatic car thing. The manufacturer will say removing the user control increases efficiency but us purists like the control and fun of the manual.
Doesn't the quad let you control heat output though? The VC is set burn rate
 

Rickb

Minister of Fire
Oct 24, 2012
1,130
St.Louis
Not sure I like that.......

They do that to pass epa testing?
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,742
07462
They do that to pass epa testing?
Sure sounds like it, now its more important then ever to make sure that the chimney has the proper draft, if your running an over draft, the stove might be more unpredictable in burns, same as a restriction like a shorter chimney or air supply issue.
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
844
Massachusetts
Doesn't the quad let you control heat output though? The VC is set burn rate
Hmm unless I'm mixing it up. So in the VC you largely get the same heat regardless of how much wood you put in? Not sure how I feel about that. I run mine at different temps all the time, especially in shoulder season. 32 degree days I only need 450 but mid winter I'm cruising at 600.

I was over recently looking at the quad....there were many beers involved though so who knows lol....and there is no manual air control. The only thing there is is a button to push to give it some extra air for I think it's 5-10 minutes, otherwise it's automatically controlled. The only thing he can change is how much wood he adds.

I fully accept could just be and old man yelling at the clouds here. I just like controlling it myself. My wife would enjoy the automatic controls though! ;lol

297.jpg
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,344
South Puget Sound, WA
Doesn't the quad let you control heat output though? The VC is set burn rate
Both are HHT stoves. They appear identical inside with different window dressing and the Quad has the ACT.

Quad.png VC.png
 
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Apr 30, 2021
29
CT
Firewood is the easy part here, expect to burn approx 4 cords per season, a cord is 4x4x8ft or 128cuft. The new stove installed in a house with spray foam insulation is screaming outside air connection needed, check with the dealer and see if the stove comes with an OAK adapter or if a static fresh air intake is needed, as the fire burns it will use the inside air of the house to feed itself, if you dont have the right controls in place you will have a hard time getting the fire going, possible smoke issues when you open the door and low fire box temps which could be confused with burning wet wood symptoms. OAK's need to be piped as to be no higher then the stove it self, this way it can be ruled out as a secondary chimney should the your flue get blocked.
If you have any questions, please feel free to ask on this thread, many great experienced people here that can offer help.
Hi, what is an OAK adapter and a static fresh Air intake?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,344
South Puget Sound, WA
OAK = outside air kit. The marketing blur shown means that the stove has a pipe stub on it to accept the outside air duct instead of a hole for which one must get an adapter. Many stoves have a 3 or 4" round hole that accepts a standard $3 start collar, but some require an OEM adapter which costs more.
 
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EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
664
SE North Carolina
Hmm unless I'm mixing it up. So in the VC you largely get the same heat regardless of how much wood you put in? Not sure how I feel about that. I run mine at different temps all the time, especially in shoulder season. 32 degree days I only need 450 but mid winter I'm cruising at 600.

I was over recently looking at the quad....there were many beers involved though so who knows lol....and there is no manual air control. The only thing there is is a button to push to give it some extra air for I think it's 5-10 minutes, otherwise it's automatically controlled. The only thing he can change is how much wood he adds.

I fully accept could just be and old man yelling at the clouds here. I just like controlling it myself. My wife would enjoy the automatic controls though! ;lol

View attachment 278414
I do think wood species will become something a savvy operator would take advantage of. I would like to experience the C3 in action during the coldest two weeks of winter. I do like the load, it light, close it, leave it operation for my downstairs second stove.
Evan
 
Apr 30, 2021
29
CT
OAK = outside air kit. The marketing blur shown means that the stove has a pipe stub on it to accept the outside air duct instead of a hole for which one must get an adapter. Many stoves have a 3 or 4" round hole that accepts a standard $3 start collar, but some require an OEM adapter which costs more.
So if I ask the dealer and they say that it doesn’t need it, what would be my answer them? Please forgive me, if my question sounds dumb, but it’s pertinent that I know the answer.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,344
South Puget Sound, WA
It depends. If the house is very tightly sealed then it may be necessary. Have you searched on OAK here? There is a lot of info and many threads. There is also a long discussion in the Sweep's Library in the Articles section.