1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Do i always have to have a roaring fire?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Chrism, Nov 15, 2011.

  1. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,825

    I bought it from the same shop we bought the Lopi Liberty from. (Local Hearth Shop)



    zap

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Chrism

    Chrism Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    318
    Loc:
    Eastern PA
    Northwind are you referring to your isle royale?
  3. northwinds

    northwinds Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,295
    Loc:
    south central WI
    Yes, I rarely burn the insert.
  4. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Messages:
    3,069
    Loc:
    Rochester,Ny.
    For a long slow burn..go cat and don't look back!
  5. Chrism

    Chrism Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    318
    Loc:
    Eastern PA
    Northwind when u get the IR up to temp and load her up for the night , the air control infront... slide left open all the way slide right closed all the way on average what position is it in for a over night burn ??
  6. northwinds

    northwinds Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,295
    Loc:
    south central WI
    It depends on the weather and how much wood is in the stove. For warmer weather and smaller loads, I might leave it open 20-30% if that's what it takes
    to stabilize temps. For cold temps and big loads, I might close leave it open only 10%. My goal is to slide it as far as I can to the right while maintaining
    temps in the 550 to 650 range. I usually move the primary air to the right in 2 or 3 stages. Half open at 550, 25% open at 625, 10% open at 650. Those
    are just examples. You will have to play around with your primary air to see what works for you.
  7. cptoneleg

    cptoneleg Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    Messages:
    1,463
    Loc:
    Virginia


    You got it Chief, real Rocket Scientest, at least I got my rocket fuel just right :lol:

    Attached Files:

  8. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    5,841
    Loc:
    madison hgts. va
    guys (and gals :) ) biggest thing is to char effectively when loading for a long burn, as stated the biggest part of emmissions (and the stuff which is bad in a flue) is during the first phase of the fire when temps are low and moisture is high, allow ample time to heat the flue and the firebox to a good burn temp , then back her down for the long burn.

    in shoulder seasons smaller splits and short hot fires are the best , a little more work but well worth it as you get just the heat you want without "bogging down" the stove with an ugly fire. woodburning is as much an art as anything you will do, it takes a little "T&E" a little deveoped "feel' but gawd its fun to do! just be safe and keep an eye on your equipment, new burners , look at your flue on a regular basis until you grasp the subtlties of burning. and above all else remember "DONT KNOW MEANS DONT KNOW!" ask questions on the hearth, the gang is fantastic at coaching , heck ive learned a ton in here and i do this for a living! if ya dont ask , you dont learn
  9. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Best post I have read in a while.
  10. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    5,841
    Loc:
    madison hgts. va

    chris, it depends on the stove, some "like" the low and slow (cat stoves are a great example as teh cat burns the stuff that kinda fire makes, in a non-cat you lok for secondaries, usually when you are low burning they kinda pop and disappear then come back but never truly extinguish. FWIW i always follow a simple process with either typwe stove , i never damp a stove back until i feel radient heat from a foot away on the sides (not hrough glass as it passes glass easily , when you have radience off a firebox, you have a warm flue and firebox, thats the biggest key as once heated a good chimney will hold that heat even after the stove is backed down considerably. the key though , is heating the flue and box up first.
  11. Chrism

    Chrism Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    318
    Loc:
    Eastern PA
    Hey north thanks ! That helps me out to be in the b allpark I'm sure. But ill tell you only had a couple fires in it and we are lucky to have this stove its an animal !!
  12. tfdchief

    tfdchief Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    3,331
    Loc:
    Tuscola, IL
    Great info. Great advise!
  13. Loco Gringo

    Loco Gringo Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    416
    Loc:
    Western North Carolina
  14. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Messages:
    3,732
    Loc:
    Just Outside the Blue Line
    Oh, I'd think that meteorology is the most inexact science out there. Doesn't stop scientists from trying to predict the weather, though, or folks from believing that they actually can.

    On a scale that matters to most of us, what goes on inside that box is fairly easy to predict. Yes, there are chaotic events happening continually in there, but it the end, gravity brings all the fuel down to the bottom (usually, anyway) and it gets burned while releasing a lot of heat. Contrast that with what happened along the Atlantic coast this season. If my stove ever behaved that unpredictably, I'd be outside cutting it up with a torch the next morning. :lol:


    Mike, as always, thanks for the excellent analysis and clear explanation. Your expert contributions are much appreciated by all here.
  15. Chrism

    Chrism Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    318
    Loc:
    Eastern PA
    Hey you guys talk about a quick hot fire for the chill in the air. I thought its bad for a cast stove or metal stove n the chimney to start a quick fire, I thought a slow warm up was the best ???
  16. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Messages:
    3,732
    Loc:
    Just Outside the Blue Line

    When I bought my stove it was covered inside with creo glaze. The guy I bought it from never used it as a proper wood stove, only with the doors opened up like a fireplace. He used some of the driest wood I've ever had, (I got about a cord of it with the stove) 3+ year-old rock maple and red oak. Yet he still got lots of creosote buildup.

    I was a bit concerned because I've always been told that these VC stoves can be creosote factories. Well, first hot fire I got going in that thing and every last speck of creo was gone. I have never seen any since then, either, no matter what the MC of the wood is. But probably the very best place to find creosote is inside the stove because you will burn it all away once the stove gets running good and hot. No lost fuel like there would be if it condensed 20' up the stack, and no accumulated hazard up there waiting for the right combo of air and spark to set it off.
  17. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Messages:
    3,732
    Loc:
    Just Outside the Blue Line
    That might be a problem if you loaded it to the gills with small splits of bone-dry softwood and opened the air all the way, but in a normal startup type fire with a medium load and proper air I don't think you'll even get the temp to raise that rapidly, particularly with all the insulation that is inside most EPA stoves. Rapid cooling is much more of an issue, like spilling a gallon of cold water on your cast stove top when you're filling your stove top water pot. :bug:
  18. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    7,607
    Loc:
    Doylestown, PA

    I'm not sure where you are getting that.
  19. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Messages:
    3,732
    Loc:
    Just Outside the Blue Line
    Something some may be talking about is in stoves with hard firebrick inside. The first burn of the season should, perhaps, be a slow-rising fire to drive out any moisture that made its way into the porous material over the summer. I've never owned a stove with any kind of brick inside. Been burning cast stoves for over 20 years now, and I am not one who is patient for a stove to heat up slowly. My stove goes from room temp to 650º inside of 20 minutes. I wouldn't even know how to stop it from doing that, with dry wood and half air it is up there before I can finish my first cuppa. Never had a crack anywhere, even on my Taiwanese box stove that I routinely punished severely in spite of its supposedly inferior castings.
  20. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,727
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Consider yourself one of the lucky ones. The problem with castings is that 10 can be fine and the 11th poor. A good company would has a system in place to test for and reject any marginal casting. That is costly and often lacking with cheap stoves. It is the lack of quality control that was Scandia's problem.

    Cast iron is pretty tough stuff. I never give a thought to quick heating up our Jotul and it is sitting in a cool greenhouse. Same for when had Jotuls in the house. I would do a small break in fire at the beginning of the season and that was it. Craig has given a good comparison in the auto industry where exhaust manifolds are daily taken up from zero degrees to many hundreds in a matter of minute.
  21. Chrism

    Chrism Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    318
    Loc:
    Eastern PA
    I'm sorry I think I might have been referring to what Battenkiller touched on I read a while ago about the first burn of the season. A friend of mine gave me some oak pallet racks ??? I'm guessin that would be good for the shoulder season instead of using the good wood (oak,maple) etc.
  22. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Messages:
    3,732
    Loc:
    Just Outside the Blue Line
    That and maybe just a touch of patent infringement. :lol:

    BTW good point about the exhaust manifolds.
  23. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Messages:
    3,732
    Loc:
    Just Outside the Blue Line
    Yes, try those and see if the problem disappears.
  24. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,727
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Use the pallet wood judiciously. It normally is drier can ignite quickly in a free-breathing stove like the IR. It's fine for smaller fires, broken up for kindling and mixed in with semi-seasoned wood.
  25. Chrism

    Chrism Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    318
    Loc:
    Eastern PA
    I was just gonna use it to warm up the cast to take the chill out of the air, not to make a rip roarin fire just warm the Isle Royale up to 200 to 250 degrees

Share This Page