Chainsaw Sharpening

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,648
Downeast Maine
No, 8 cords before changing out the chain lol ;hm. I sharpen every 2 tanks of gas ish usually depending on the wood. I'm usually cutting oak/maple.

I said 3/16 because that's what my files are if I remember correctly. I'll have to go look.
I tend to sharpen several at one time rather than sharpen as I go. After a few tanks, or I get tired, I swap the chain and flip the bar. When all the chains are dull I sharpen them at the start of the next work day.

The round files will be a different size than the grinding stones, I don't know why.
 

wormser

New Member
Feb 16, 2021
16
Finger Lakes, NY
" the only con I see and with experience, it will come naturally is to sharpen each tooth evenly, if you dont, you will get a curve cut when you want to go straight."

So that's why as I'm sawing through a larger round my saw curves as it goes. It's only happening with one chain and in my mind it was always when I flipped the bar so something wasn't right with the bar and soon would need replaced. I'm also a lefty so I thought maybe holding the saw different than normal played a part of that. I'll have to look closer at the teeth.
 

hawkeye4771

Member
Dec 3, 2009
36
western NY
I have the Stihl 2n1 sharpener and like that but I've seen the electric sharpener at Harbor Freight and am curious about that as it seems I recall it costing around $35 ish. Wondering if anyone here has one and how well it works.
 

Simonkenton

Minister of Fire
Feb 27, 2014
1,893
Marshall NC
Yes you should flip the bar every two or three tank fulls. Have you ever noticed that you have more oil in your oil tank than you used to have? That is because a bunch of crud has built up in the bar groove and the oil cannot squirt properly onto the chain.
While you are flipping the chain clean out that groove. I have an old Sawzall blade that I use and it works great.
 

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patrickk222

New Member
Mar 28, 2021
15
alderson wv
i usually just use a round file and sharpen everytime i get back from cutting and usually every 3rd sharpening bust out the square file and do the rakes as well ..... i've also been thinkin about investin in a drummel and said file
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,710
07462
@stoveliker I think I have the right person.. can you write down what you do while sharping your chains, I think I remember you saying that you use so oil / cleaner first then sharpen, for storage you coat in another oil so it doesnt get rusty, I'm just curious because I have quite a few chains in all sorts of shape that I'd like to sharpen then store, some have grim, others just have build up of wood debris and junk, would like to clean them first.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
696
Eastern Long Island NY
@stoveliker I think I have the right person.. can you write down what you do while sharping your chains, I think I remember you saying that you use so oil / cleaner first then sharpen, for storage you coat in another oil so it doesnt get rusty, I'm just curious because I have quite a few chains in all sorts of shape that I'd like to sharpen then store, some have grim, others just have build up of wood debris and junk, would like to clean them first.
I'm sorry - I gladly write down what I do, but I have more to learn from you than you from me in this respect.
I think you are referring to someone else. I read that post too (but where...?).

To try to be a nice guy nonetheless, here it goes:
I do clean the chain first (and the groove in the bar - see even my terminology is likely off...) with diesel (or gasoline..) and a hard brush. Some parts even an old toothbrush. You'll get dirty with the brush... Use glasses. I sometimes use a face shield - so I won't look like a bike rider with spots all over the face but the eyes...

I do use oil to store my (only other) chain. It does not really matter what oil in my opinion, as long as it keeps the water away. An old kitchen box (glass/plastic, but with a lid) with oil in it works well. No need to dump the oil for years; just take the chain out, drip it off (or use a rag), mount it and go.
Might spat a bit when you first start the saw (depending on the viscosity of the oil and how well you dried it before mounting), so aim it right. You can see some nice traces on my driveway ;lol

Use the right bar oil and you'll be fine.
Said the amateur - and now the professionals will chime in and tell me I'm stupid, from which I'll learn. So all is good.
 

Okla

New Member
Mar 28, 2021
12
The Berkshires
Anyone using an electric or battery operator sharpener and thoughts? Handheld? It's the one thing I hate doing in the process of getting wood. I have 4 chains that I rotate through and usually a rainy day sharpen them all up. I walk around the shop half the day trying to think of other things to do until I finally give in and do it.
I, too, learned how to sharpen chain by hand...but I, too, don't like doing it. The truth is that I let them go too long and [usually] end up with chains that need to be reduced enough to get back to good steel. This is why I've researched [on and off] electric grinders, but it seems like the good ones are either no longer manufactured or are priced beyond justification. I definitely understand how you feel, though.
 

Isaac Carlson

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2012
516
NW Wisconsin
I used to file exclusively, but then started hitting rebar, nails, concrete, etc... so I bought a grinder. I have just stuck with it.
Chains don't hold an edge as long when ground, but it works.
 

Nealm66

Minister of Fire
Sep 25, 2020
876
Western Washington
I would roll up my ground chains single in newspaper when I was cutting timber. Had a pack sack that held spare wedges and a few chainsaw parts, extra log tape etc so this kept them from getting dull rolling around in the pack.
 

burning VC

New Member
Feb 6, 2020
13
wNC
I have the Stihl 2n1 sharpener and like that but I've seen the electric sharpener at Harbor Freight and am curious about that as it seems I recall it costing around $35 ish. Wondering if anyone here has one and how well it works.
I have the HF one. It works well. It's pretty aggressive and removes a good amount of edge quickly.

I normally use a round file to hone burrs and chips on the chain, but after 5-6 tanks of fuel I examine the chain. If I don't feel like I have enough 'fresh' edge to hone.....I reset and use the HF grinder, take a bit off and start the cycle over again.

The hardest part about it is making sure you cut both sides evenly, it's so aggressive that you can easily take off a bit too much. Then you gotta flip it and make both sides match again.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
592
SE North Carolina
Well I’m just gonna throw this out there and let you make your own decisions about how important keeping all the cutters the same length is. Evan

 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,648
Downeast Maine
Did he really use that jacked up looking chain to cut that thin cookie? Not being a fan of his narration I skipped to the end to where he cut the little round.