Cooking thread, anyone?

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DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
1,308
Texas
That's quick thinking, looks delicious. It sounds like you could use a solar oven.

I looked into solar ovens during our first or second summer here, I think, and decided against one. I’m sure I could learn to use one, but instead we’ve opted to try to cook using minimum energy indoors (bread maker, electric skillet, pressure cooker, crock pot). When something really needs oven-type heat, we have a gas grill outside that we can use. When it’s super-hot outside, though, I like to minimize how many times we open the doors during the late afternoon when the heat is most intense. Last I checked it was 102 outside. Ugh.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
2,424
SE North Carolina
Did salmon on the grill. Half smoked, half indirect grilled.
Grill Temp was about 300 degrees. Cooked to 145 internal.

Dry brined. 2:1 brown sugar to salt for 2 hours.

Was not a great piece of fish but came out amazing. Added a Chile rub as it was going on tacos. Yes salmon tacos. Really quite good. More fishy than a traditional fish taco but it held up better to hot sauce smoke, Chiles and sweet coleslaw.

No pics sorry.
 

fbelec

Minister of Fire
Nov 23, 2005
3,312
Massachusetts
nice here thank god. mid to upper 70's. it's nice we can keep the windows open both i and the wife are dealing with covid for the first time
 

DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
1,308
Texas
nice here thank god. mid to upper 70's. it's nice we can keep the windows open both i and the wife are dealing with covid for the first time

I’m sorry to hear about the COVID, fbelec. I wish you and your wife both speedy recoveries with no lingering symptoms. I’m glad your weather is nice. We’ve broken all sorts of records down here near San Antonio this May and June. I’m really rooting for record rain and cool, but that doesn’t seem to be in the forecast.

We’ve been having light, fairly cool meals like peach lassi (a yogurt drink) and popcorn or salad and popcorn because it’s been so hot. I‘m defrosting some trout this afternoon, and we’ll pan cook that up tonight to eat with some leftover okra masala and rice.
 

fbelec

Minister of Fire
Nov 23, 2005
3,312
Massachusetts
thank you. todays weather is really nice, low eighties and drying out. i don't wish the heat on anyone. if it's cool you put on a layer. if it's hot there is nothing to do but sweat.

you will be eating good in my book i love trout.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
2,424
SE North Carolina
Cherry grilled/smoked fish trio and shrimp. Still cooking I will let you know how it turns out.

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DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
1,308
Texas
My husband and I did a lot of outside work yesterday in the heat, and we had plans for a pretty simple dinner. My oldest wanted something fancier than grilled chicken thighs, and I told her to find me some recipes or come up with ideas. She suggested a butter chicken sauce, and I actually had some leftover in the freezer from some previous cooking. She also wanted grilled vegetables, but I didn’t have anything on hand that would suit. My next door neighbor, however, grows lots of peppers each summer and has a freezer full that she was recently offering me. Most are pretty hot, but she did have some poblanos, which still have heat, but less than the habaneros, serranos, and jalapeños which she also has in abundance. She let my daughter take home a whole bag of peppers, which my two daughters worked together to seed and stuff with a mixture of chicken and rice mixed with my butter chicken sauce. She then had my husband grill them a bit with some onions. They turned out really well, though some were pretty hot. We had to do some trading at the table to accommodate palates and bring out the milk in addition to the iced hibiscus tea.

78EEC2B4-EAB5-4D0C-A087-64C08A35B14A.jpeg 9DB0C966-5CCD-4B3F-814C-2ECC4FF30A12.jpeg
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
2,424
SE North Carolina
How did it turn out?
I dry brined snapper cod and tilapia. All about. 4-5 hours. 2:1 brown sugar to kosher salt. Tilapia was almost inedible as it was way to salty. Cod was salty. And the snapper was really quite good maybe a tad to salty. Shrimp got a lemon garlic olive oil marinades.

Lesson learned- short,1 hour max, dry brine time for thin fish fillets.

Shrimp were really quite good. Ribs were better.
 

DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
1,308
Texas
Yum. I love shrimp but don’t get to eat it much since two of my kids have a shellfish allergy.

I had to be out of the house today for several hours this morning—watering the garden during drought, helping the neighbors with something, running an older child to the library, picking up milk. When I came home my nine year old had finished making cookie dough. My husband had advised her to replace “shortening” in the recipe with butter since she had no idea what “shortening” was. Other than that she did it on her own.

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After the dough had chilled, she rolled all the balls. I helped her a little with placement on two stoneware pans, and I took those in and out of the oven for her since her arms are a bit short for that yet. She then rolled the cookies in powdered sugar.

She was very proud of herself, and I was very proud of her.

We have plans to have a taco party tomorrow, having our two music lesson instructors over for dinner. My music students helped me make tortillas today. The nine year old made the corn tortillas (with a bit of help). The twelve year old made the flour dough, but I rolled the tortillas for him. The nine year old also cooked just about all of the tortillas for me. Tortillas are a lot of work, but teamwork helps.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,219
South Puget Sound, WA
Getting kids involved early in cooking is a great life skill for them. Bonding over baking is a wonderful way to do this.
 

DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
1,308
Texas
Getting kids involved early in cooking is a great life skill for them. Bonding over baking is a wonderful way to do this.

I like getting them to help with cooking. I’m less of a baker than I am a cook, and we try to avoid using the oven much during the high heat, but I figure it’s good for kids to learn their way around the kitchen at a pretty early age.

The nine year old was grumpy Friday afternoon, so I got her engaged in helping me make guacamole. She peeled the onions and the garlic for the food processor and pitted and scooped the flesh out of the avocados. We used the recipe from her cookbook. The recipes in it are good food with mostly real ingredients (not lots of processed shortcuts). I recommend it (and the sequel) for little cooks. (We originally found the second at the local library but liked it so well that we put both books on her Christmas list.)

Amazon product
 
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DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
1,308
Texas
We had a yummy dinner of marinated grilled chicken tenders for dinner tonight along with grilled eggplant and zucchini and steamed rice. I used this recipe for inspiration for the marinade, but I doubled it in order to have enough for the vegetables as well. I replaced the Italian seasoning with fresh basil and oregano an added some extra garlic. I was very pleased when my teenager asked what we had done to the chicken because we had taken it to the “next level.”

 

Poindexter

Minister of Fire
Jun 28, 2014
2,622
Fairbanks, Alaska
@EbS-P in particular and everyone in general, what I have found brining salmon is salt penetrates faster and further then sugar.

If you have a brine, regardless of proportion and time, that works for the people you feed regularly, stick with it.

Depends on your schedule too. I often brine salmon (overnight) in 4 parts sugar to one part salt, rinse in the morning and lay out on drying racks while I am at the office, and then smoke them when I get home.

With four kids and the wife home I came up with a sugar/salt balance and time that worked for everyone I was cooking for back in the day. There are probably as many brine recipes as there are Alaskans to write them. I have tried many. My conclusion is, if the underlying sugar/salt balance is good, you don't need juniper berries or eye of newt or any of the rest of it, but if the sugar/ salt balance is wrong, no amount of nutmeg or lemon or dill weed is going to save it.

I have no experience brining other fin fish, that is expert level kitchen magic right there.