EV #4 for Woodgeek!

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.

woodgeek

Minister of Fire
Jan 27, 2008
4,936
SE PA
Lewis.jpg

Its a 2022 Bolt EV, better trim (LT2). Its a lot like my 2017 (red) Bolt, except better safety tech and leather seats.

I got it last Th, already driven it 700 miles, and fast charged it 2X.

I'm pretty stoked.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
98,138
South Puget Sound, WA
Sweet. It looks good in black.
 

ABMax24

Minister of Fire
Sep 18, 2019
1,791
Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada
I didn't realize the bolt had a 65kwh battery, I always thought they were a city car with a sub 30kwh pack.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
4,085
SE North Carolina
Did you keep the 2017?
 

woodgeek

Minister of Fire
Jan 27, 2008
4,936
SE PA
I didn't realize the bolt had a 65kwh battery, I always thought they were a city car with a sub 30kwh pack.

Yup. The car is VERY misunderstood. The cabin is large and airy, like a small SUV. The seating height is like a crossover, between a sedan and an SUV. And the shape of the car (and no hood) makes it look like a tiny sub-compact car like a FIT.

In reality it a car with a very spacious interior, tons of legroom front and back, a high riding height, plenty of cargo space and a 259 mile EPA range. And a decent 6.5 second 0-60 time. :)

People go WOW, when they open the door to get in. Think TARDIS.

And according to CNET, the 2023 model will be $6k cheaper than what I just spent! But probably hard to find for a few more months.
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
7,899
Northern NH
They do seem to be good choice once the battery issue was resolved. Hopefully the high gas prices will get more folks into them, the first ruin of Bolts were hampered by the cheap gas prices that were not that long ago. Once they become common place more folks will buy them. Chevy needs to sell them to keep selling SUVs now that the CAFE standards are back so I expect they will keep them attractively priced. My bet is the range will go up in a few years.

I think the Bolt also cured the Volt Curse of banging one's head on the front pillar when getting in and out due to the steep windshield angle. The owners got used to it but someone Igot ride from one day joked about it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: woodgeek

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
98,138
South Puget Sound, WA
I am waiting to see how the Equinox turns out, though it is tempting to sell/trade the Volt now while the value is high. Will the 2023 Bolt have the Ultium battery pack?
 

woodgeek

Minister of Fire
Jan 27, 2008
4,936
SE PA
Yup. the (identical) 2023 MY MSRP will come in at $26k base and $29.5k fully equipped, like mine. I also get $750 back from my state. Seems like a steal TBH. The average new car sold in the US last year cost $47k.

While I leased at $6k more than that, my residual on the lease did NOT drop. So that's OK.

The Bolt EV and (stretched) EUV are dead ends... they will stick with the 'BEV2' platform. I think they will be the discount offering and all the new BEVs will be on the Ultium platform.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
7,252
Downeast Maine
How does it do on broken roads with massive bumps, humps, and potholes?
 

woodgeek

Minister of Fire
Jan 27, 2008
4,936
SE PA
How does it do on broken roads with massive bumps, humps, and potholes?
I watched several 2022 Bolt and Tesla Model 3 comparisons (the latter is now about $10-15k more). The latter has 250 hp vs 200 hp, and a 5.4 s versus 6.5 s 0-60 time.

Several reviewers said the Tesla was a smoother and quieter ride than the Bolt on a smooth rode, but definitely less fun on a bumpy road. YMMV.

The stock tires are not crazy low profile, but they're not tall truck tires either. The X fatally damaged three tires on the 2017 Bolt in 1 year by hitting deep potholes and a curb at speed, but I think that was more her than the car. :) Fun with no spare. There is room for a tiny donut spare in the back if you really want (I think in Canada they are required to include one), but you will have to source that and a jack yourself.

I am going to swap out the stock LRR tires (which are self-sealing) for Cross-Climate 2's for better grip and winter performance. And then put the stocks back on in 39 mos when I return it. That will probably drop the EPA range to 225 miles EPA, but it should be acceptable snow and ice and rain.
 

DBoon

Minister of Fire
Jan 14, 2009
1,335
Central NY
I'm very happy with my 2019 Bolt, especially with the replacement (now 65 kWh battery pack). Ride is great, it is very quiet, and I can baby it to 300+ miles in the summer. I do a lot of road trips in it and while I don't love the relatively slower DCFC of the Bolt compared to some of the newer EVs, I don't find it that objectionable either. I like that the 2022 Bolt now has a sunroof option - couldn't understand why they didn't offer that earlier. The reason the dealer gave me was BS - reduced mileage when open (never found this very true with my Chevy Sonic with a sunroof).
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
98,138
South Puget Sound, WA
I like that the 2022 Bolt now has a sunroof option - couldn't understand why they didn't offer that earlier. The reason the dealer gave me was BS - reduced mileage when open (never found this very true with my Chevy Sonic with a sunroof).
More likely it would be slightly reduced mileage due to the added weight. There also might have been some structural reinforcement needed for it?
 

jebatty

Minister of Fire
Jan 1, 2008
5,796
Northern MN
During the long wait period to get the new battery for my 2017 Bolt, now nearing 40,000 miles. I pondered getting a 2022 Bolts. Except for the battery issue, I have no complaints about my Bolt. And the new battery has extended my range. With the warm summer now finally here, battery range charges to about 280 miles with Hilltop Reserve "on" and so far up to about 305 miles with Hill Top Reserve "off." Range wise it is competitive with my wife's Tesla Model 3. And if the Bolt had a fast charging network like Tesla, the Bolt could have been a hit out of the park and established Chevy as as a world leader in the compact BEV market

So, the reason I didn't get a 2022 Bolt is that is simply that I followed the words of wisdom "if it isn't broke, don't fix it," And my 2017 Bolt is not broke (yet).
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
7,899
Northern NH
My guess is you will not regret holding off, battery tech is changing rapidly with a lot of new tech that is on the cusp of being commercial. CATL a big Chinese battery supplier is claiming they will be shipping a 1000 KM (620 Mile) range battery next year.
 

DBoon

Minister of Fire
Jan 14, 2009
1,335
Central NY
I have never had a problem getting 300 miles of range with my Bolt in the summer. Am I driving 75 mph on the highway? Nope. But if I need the range I know I can slow it down to 60 mph and (without a headwind) 300 miles of range is not a problem. With the new battery with 5 kWh more of capacity, I could go further or faster.

I have no issues with the Bolt recall. I got a brand new battery at 70,000 miles - can't complain about that. I'll have this car at least another 5 years after which I am sure that there will be a variety of great choices for EVs with great range.
 
  • Like
Reactions: EbS-P

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
4,085
SE North Carolina

woodgeek

Minister of Fire
Jan 27, 2008
4,936
SE PA
So does this apply to you?
The retroactive discount is not available, bc I leased. Ironically, to reduce the risk I faced due to falling (resale) prices. LOL.

As it is, the 59% residual I have is now more likely to be 'high' and I can get some money back when I return the car. And in the meantime, I have a smaller payment than if I had purchased. C'est la vie.
 
  • Like
Reactions: EbS-P

woodgeek

Minister of Fire
Jan 27, 2008
4,936
SE PA
During the long wait period to get the new battery for my 2017 Bolt, now nearing 40,000 miles. I pondered getting a 2022 Bolts. Except for the battery issue, I have no complaints about my Bolt. And the new battery has extended my range. With the warm summer now finally here, battery range charges to about 280 miles with Hilltop Reserve "on" and so far up to about 305 miles with Hill Top Reserve "off." Range wise it is competitive with my wife's Tesla Model 3. And if the Bolt had a fast charging network like Tesla, the Bolt could have been a hit out of the park and established Chevy as as a world leader in the compact BEV market

So, the reason I didn't get a 2022 Bolt is that is simply that I followed the words of wisdom "if it isn't broke, don't fix it," And my 2017 Bolt is not broke (yet).

Yesterday I made a day trip to the Jersey Shore for a beach day with some friends of my GF. Round trip was 200 miles on the dot, mostly (fast) HW, and I still had 57 miles on the GOM when I got back to my garage. Quite pleased.

A long way from the LEAF Gen 1.
 

woodgeek

Minister of Fire
Jan 27, 2008
4,936
SE PA
5 month, 5000 mile update.

Absolutely no issue with the car. I've done several shorter summer trips with it, ranging from 200 mile round trip day trips to the beach, to 500 mile weekenders to CT to see my Sis. Longest was to Dennis, MA, on Cape Cod, for 5 days, maybe 400 miles each way and another 150 driving around the Cape.

Using ABRP for route planning (to minimize total driving + charging time), you mostly charge starting from 10-20% SOC and quit around 60%. This manages 50-55 kW, so the charge time is about 30 minutes for adding 100+ miles of HW range. If we stop for a meal, we get more charge than that. I think charging on the CC trip added maybe 90 minutes to what would've been a 7 hour drive with no stops. On the way there, no issues. On the way back, we ended up at a station that was crowded (took one of two available stalls) and I was only getting 25-30 kW. I should've tried to the other free one, but didn't and that added another charging stop later, and maybe 2 hours total charging rather than 90 mins on the way back. While the way there was a breeze, the way back we started after lunch, so it seemed to take forever (bc we got back after dark).

I have since learned that the DCFC cables are liquid cooled. And if the DCFC unit is OK, but the coolant appears to have an issue, the unit throttles down to 25 kW as a safety measure. IOW, bad cable. Now I know.

Daily driving on back roads in the summer, stock tires, I am getting maybe 270 or more miles, and charge about once a week.

Lifetime average eff is 4.0 miles/kWh. I think this means 3.7 on HW roadtrips, and 4.2 on back-roads.

I have also determined that the cargo area carries 1/2 face cord.

I will soon trade out the stock tires, which are LRR but not very sticky, for CrossClimate2's. expect to lose about 5-7% eff/range, but that car should do very well in the winter climate we get here (more ice than deep snow).

Fun fact: I leased for 39 mos, and got the lease for MSRP in mid May. Two weeks later Chevy dropped the MSRP by $6400 !! They offered a rebate to everyone that bought the car after Jan1 2022, for $6400. But originally leasers were SOL (as reported upthread). They changed their mind and sent me a check for $5400. With my state rebate ($750) this is a 35% discount on TCO, after purchase.
 

woodgeek

Minister of Fire
Jan 27, 2008
4,936
SE PA
Oh, yeah, on longer trips I need to 'destination charge'. Since hotels and AirBnB's still rarely come with L2's, in both cases I charged using a L1 portable with a 25' 12 AWG extension cord, strung out a window. I have now done this at one motel and 2 Airbnbs. In each case I got enough range daily to keep up with my needs.
 

semipro

Minister of Fire
Jan 12, 2009
4,236
SW Virginia
I have also determined that the cargo area carries 1/2 face cord.
It seems like there's some irony in that observation somehow - use of a zero-emission EV, likely fueled by a utility relying largely on fossil fuels, to haul the most basic of fuels derived from solar power.
Our current situation regarding the generation and use of energy is indeed seemingly complex.
 

woodgeek

Minister of Fire
Jan 27, 2008
4,936
SE PA
use of a zero-emission EV, likely fueled by a utility relying largely on fossil fuels, to haul the most basic of fuels derived from solar power

Mu local grid is about 50% fracked gas and 50% legacy nukes. I charge almost exclusively during low demand periods (midnight-5AM), so my electricity is probably mostly nuclear.

Burning the face cord in the 6 coldest weeks of the year will save me about 2000 kWh of electricity, which almost the same as my annual usage in the EV.

The wood is punky oak that a friend's Mom (a former woodburner) was going to drag into the woods to rot if I hadn't taken it.