Fine Tuning BioMass

goodwood

Member
Jun 19, 2011
49
cny
Wrote this nozzle replacement process in a post and thot it would be useful for other BioMass 60 owners. I pray yours is easier to replace than mine.

NOZZLE REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE:
If you hope to reuse the side blocks it may be hard. We've not run with storage so bonding due to creosote could have been worse for our boiler than yours. This is a wood boiler so it's more likely to be gooey in the upper chamber. The key is understanding how the side blocks must be removed. Since ours was stuck, there was no way to tell if you're doing something wrong. I'm of average height, but stocky. So when I did get my body into the boiler, I had no space to work. I finally had to hire someone smaller than me because the 60's chamber is too deep to work from the outside and too small for me to work inside. :confused:

1) I tried to use soft tools, wood or nylon to loosen the blocks. Try to get movement in one of the side blocks. Take your pick, front or back. Try both, one or the other will be less bonded than the other. Once you have some movement, use some type of tool (big flat blade screwdriver) to pry on the top of the block to get it to pivot the top into the chamber. I chipped all my blocks prying and working to get them loose but they were still useable.

2) Once loose they will rotate about the bottom into the chamber and then you can lift it from their metal pocket. Getting the first one out on each side is the hardest because now for the second block you can get a wedge behind the second one and pop it loose. MARK the blocks or place them on the floor so they'll go back in the same location.

3) Start over and repeat on the other side. At this point you may want to go get an adult beverage, watch football and attempt the other side following Saturday morning.

4) Now that you've successfully removed the side blocks with hopefully minimal damage. Take a hammer and chisel and beat the crap out of that old nozzle. Turn it into a thousand pieces for all the hours and missed football games it took to get you to this point. <> You can try to bump it from the bottom, or pry it out, but turning it into powder at this point is more satisfying.

5) I used a right angle grinder used for sharpening bush hog blades to grind/trim the nozzle. It took us 3-4 fitting attempts until it dropped into the nozzle cavity. I can't remember if the nozzle rope insulation is on the top or bottom, I think around the top, but not sure.

6) Clean the side block cavities so the blocks will set properly. Replace blocks back to their same positions. Admire.

7) Now cogitate if a removable shield to protect that nozzle and hopefully double it's life is a good idea.
i was going to attempt changing my nozzle tomorrow, when you took the side blocks out , i'm assuming they rotate up?, i bought some replacements just in case, i just wanted to make sure which direction they come out, thanks
 

Tennman

Minister of Fire
Mar 4, 2009
983
Southern Tenn
The top of the side blocks rotate in towards the center of the chamber, Then up and out of the pocket for the bottom of the side block. Enjoy!
 

goodwood

Member
Jun 19, 2011
49
cny
The top of the side blocks rotate in towards the center of the chamber, Then up and out of the pocket for the bottom of the side block. Enjoy!
every thing came out easy,i loosened side blocks with a screw driver, had them all out in 10 minutes, lifted the nozzle out,it had 2 gaskets on it which i reused on new nozzle, the new nozzle fit right in the slot, put the side blocks back in place, took about 90 minutes including cleaning all the ash and creosote out. it was actually easier than cleaning the tubes out for me
 

Tennman

Minister of Fire
Mar 4, 2009
983
Southern Tenn
Wow... gotta say I'm a bit jealous goodwood. I'm partially to blame for all ceramics being glued in with creosote after 5 years running w/o storage. But there's no way my new nozzle would have dropped in. I'm happy for you.... kinda. Congrats.
 

ryooper

New Member
Dec 18, 2013
49
centralu.p.
Question, I have a 40 was Wondering if anyone had that fine ash build up on the fan and if that's just regular cleaning maintainance? The fan on mine was clogged heavily just took it off and cleaned it up
 

jaoneill

Burning Hunk
Question, I have a 40 was Wondering if anyone had that fine ash build up on the fan and if that's just regular cleaning maintainance? The fan on mine was clogged heavily just took it off and cleaned it up
Which fan? Unless your 40 is substantially different than my 80 there is almost no way that the primary air supply fan could collect ash; any ash buildup would be after the combustion chambers, not before. If you are referencing the flue fan it is understandable that it might collect some ash. Chalk it up to regular maintenance.
 

Bugwood

Member
Dec 6, 2013
13
Prince George, B.C,
Question, I have a 40 was Wondering if anyone had that fine ash build up on the fan and if that's just regular cleaning maintainance? The fan on mine was clogged heavily just took it off and cleaned it up
Yes it can do with cleaning. If you're burning properly it does collect dryish type ash and generally sloughs off and keeps relatively clean by itself. I clean mine about every 6-8 weeks when burning steady. If the boiler isn't burning properly it can built up with heavier material within a week. If I remember correctly it is a left hand thread nut if you decide to remove the fan from the motor shaft.
 

ryooper

New Member
Dec 18, 2013
49
centralu.p.
Which fan? Unless your 40 is substantially different than my 80 there is almost no way that the primary air supply fan could collect ash; any ash buildup would be after the combustion chambers, not before. If you are referencing the flue fan it is understandable that it might collect some ash. Chalk it up to regular maintenance.
I only have the one flue fan, it was after about 2 months steady burning it clogged up pretty good fan wasn't turning as freely as it should took it off had some thicker build up on it mostly the light ash though cleaned up easy so as you stated chalked up to regular maint. First season with it just making sure I wasn't doing something wrong, guess it's all in the learning curve, thanks for the reply.
 

woodsmaster

Minister of Fire
Jan 25, 2010
2,878
N.W. Ohio
I only have the one flue fan, it was after about 2 months steady burning it clogged up pretty good fan wasn't turning as freely as it should took it off had some thicker build up on it mostly the light ash though cleaned up easy so as you stated chalked up to regular maint. First season with it just making sure I wasn't doing something wrong, guess it's all in the learning curve, thanks for the reply.
I only have the one flue fan, it was after about 2 months steady burning it clogged up pretty good fan wasn't turning as freely as it should took it off had some thicker build up on it mostly the light ash though cleaned up easy so as you stated chalked up to regular maint. First season with it just making sure I wasn't doing something wrong, guess it's all in the learning curve, thanks for the reply.
I've never had to clean mine other than blowing the dust off by mouth.
 

Mike Fromme

Burning Hunk
Apr 18, 2014
213
Maine
I've had a biomass 60 for four years. Never had to do anything to either fan.

Maybe with only one fan the 40's are more prone to needing cleaning?
 

ElkRiverFJ

Member
Aug 30, 2012
21
WV
I only have the one flue fan, it was after about 2 months steady burning it clogged up pretty good fan wasn't turning as freely as it should took it off had some thicker build up on it mostly the light ash though cleaned up easy so as you stated chalked up to regular maint. First season with it just making sure I wasn't doing something wrong, guess it's all in the learning curve, thanks for the reply.

I have a BioMass 25 and I had to clean my flue fan about halfway through this season. So, it had a year and a half on it. It was like you describe, a light ash build up, but mostly it was settled down in the bottom of the housing and the fan blades were hitting the pile of ash in the bottom as it spun. I'm just going to add removing and cleaning the fan to my end of season clean-out each year.
 

goodwood

Member
Jun 19, 2011
49
cny
anyone change lower refractory on a biomass 60? i had a big piece break off from the front section, just wondering how hard it is to replace
 

Tennman

Minister of Fire
Mar 4, 2009
983
Southern Tenn
It's simple. Just pull them out. They just lay on the lower chamber floor.
 

Tennman

Minister of Fire
Mar 4, 2009
983
Southern Tenn
VERY nice Greg. It's all so clean! You've guilted me into cleaning ours.
 
Hey guys, so I'm considering becoming an official member of this thread, that is buying a Biomass 40 from New Horizons. I'm looking for some input if anyone would be so kind. Shortly I'll be buying a 3800 sf 2-story house with high ceilings, good insul, and bad windows. I'm needing to get a heating system that's a little more economical than the oil hog boiler that's parked in the basement. I've been looking at the European boilers because of their pricepoints, the Eko 40(used from jeffesonm on this forum), the Biomass 40, and the Attack DP 45 Lambda. The Lambda looks like a fine piece of work, but New Horizons has been steering me in the direction of the Biomass, and I guess maybe that's why I'm posting here, to garner some support for that leaning:) So, what are your opinions? will the Biomass 40 be a good size option for the house as described? Would it keep the house warm through a night in VA(rare week in the teens)? I hope to put in some storage as I go along, possibly starting out with several old water heaters. Any thoughts? and thanks a ton!
 

jaoneill

Burning Hunk
So, what are your opinions? will the Biomass 40 be a good size option for the house as described? Would it keep the house warm through a night in VA(rare week in the teens)? I hope to put in some storage as I go along, possibly starting out with several old water heaters. Any thoughts? and thanks a ton!
My thought would be, spring for the 60. The 40 would be marginal in a cold snap. I have a similar sized house and started with an Econoburn 150K BTU ten years ago and it was maxed out most of the winter. That said, we do see weeks on end in the subzero range, considerably colder than Virginia. I am going into my third year with the Biomass 80 and the difference is night & day. It has double the output of the old Econoburn but the technology is also light years ahead. The Biomass is definitely a good buy and I found the support (warranty) exceptional. Last fall the controller got a case of the crazies after sitting idle for 4 months. I called New Horizons, he walked me through the diagnostics again (I had tried all I could think of), when we got nowhere, he popped a new one in the mail and I was in the race three days later.

The other major consideration is burn time. Even in your climate you will be hard pressed to get much more than an 8 hr burn with the 40 and should see 12 hours with the larger size. There may be others with differing opinions but I would say unless you are ready to install a substantial amount of storage with the boiler, upsize to the 60.

Jim
 

jaoneill

Burning Hunk
Changed out the nozzles in my Biomass 80 last week; PITA but not a terrible process. Front one dropped right in but the width of the lower section of rear nozzle needed to be trimmed 1/8". Spoiled an afternoon start to finish. Should have replaced them last year (after 2years use), rear one was shot and problematic last winter, ended up filling it in with a piece of firebrick before the season was over. Fires like a champ now.
 

jaoneill

Burning Hunk
I have a question for those with a Biomass 60, or 80.... My 80 has two nozzles, as I assume that the 60 does. It appears that the primary air tubes along the sides of the upper chamber have a number of openings, but that the ends, near the back, are open. I find that this seems to cause the rear of the fire to burn much faster than the front. I will often find wood/coals up to the bottom of the door near the front, and over the front nozzle, while the rear nozzle is clear. Has anyone else run into this or, if so, tried resolving it. My thought was to try partially blocking the open ends of the tubes but it's hard to know how much to restrict them.
 

Bump

New Member
Dec 26, 2017
2
Mich
I just rebuilt an aspen 175. Last year I had a door leak which trashed the entire boiler. Repoured the burn box floor and gas trap in the lower, added fire brick along with splitting the primary and secondary air. Cut in a clean out on the front and redesigned the door. Added a stack fan and rewired. Less wood less ash more heat. Been picking through this site for two years and if there's any aspen owners left it can be saved.
 

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Biomass40

New Member
Jan 13, 2018
43
Michigan
I have a biomass 40, am having trouble with upper door leaking smoke. Have cleaned boiler before i started burning and replaced door seal and still leaks any help with this is greatly appreciated.