Heatmaster G series question

Sukhoi29SU Posted By Sukhoi29SU, Nov 21, 2018 at 7:50 PM

  1. maple1

    maple1
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    I think those can swing both ways....
     
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  2. Sukhoi29SU

    Sukhoi29SU
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    Nov 20, 2017
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    Boiled Over, thanks for the info.

    Brenndatomu, the Heatmaster G series was recommended by quite a few people. But, the reason I’m on this forum is to gather info because I haven’t been in the market for one of these for a very long time and there is a lot to learn. There very well might be a better option.

    The Heatmaster G’s are certified to be installed indoors. However, maybe a Switzer or Garn is a better option. They sure look like they take up a lot of real estate though.

    The pellet boilers might be a better option, long term.

    In the end, if I end up with a wood burner , I hope to make a decision on the option that I can sufficiently heat my home, garage and workshop with the least amount of wood required to burn. Still need to do a bit more research I think.

    I do think height-wise the Garn or Switzer is a better fit.
     
  3. sloeffle

    sloeffle
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    A little off topic, please take this FWIW.

    I’d spend all the money I can afford on insulation. I’d add insulation to the bottom of your basement concrete slab and to the exterior of your foundation walls. Nothing worse than cold floors IMHO. Insulation isn’t sexy and you can’t really brag to your buddies about it. If I were building a house it would be at least to the pretty good house insulation standard. For a house the size of yours, I’d think it would be money well spent.
     
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  4. Sukhoi29SU

    Sukhoi29SU
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    Sir, thanks for the response.
    I do plan on prioritizing proper insulation. Initially I had planned on what you have recommended - radiant floors in the lower level. However, I don’t know how I can properly insulate the existing concrete slab down there and get radiant floor heat without losing too much ceiling height. I’ve been considering insulating within the floor joists above and installing radiant ceiling heat for the lower level and radiant floor heat for the main level (running hydronic lines above and below either spray foam insulation or r19. I’ve struggled to figure out how I’d properly insulate the exterior of the foundation because in the lower level the wall to the south has my existing garage slab behind it. And the outside to the north there is a concrete slab underneath a deck. I don’t know how I’d properly insulate from outside, around the foundation. (Reference pic). Any ideas here? I’ve been thinking of a layer of thin insulation topped by a floating floor to try and limit the cold floor, and relying on ceiling radiant for heat? I just don’t know if I’ll be able to get radiant floor heat after proper insulation and not take up too much space between the ceiling.

    D3411048-7F50-4ED0-9D17-0C78E476064E.png
     
  5. Sukhoi29SU

    Sukhoi29SU
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    Nov 20, 2017
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    I just realized you might have thought this is all new construction. This is a gut remodel project where I’m turning the existing attached garage into living space, and adding the attached garage with the span Crete and workshop below to a different area. I attached the building docs to my other thread.

    A lot of considerations with a remodel... it’d be a lot easier if I just knocked the house down and started from scratch- but hopefully I’m saving some money by doing it this way- and the house is generally well built and has a lot of potential with the floor plan by taking some walls down and adding the garage to a different area.
     

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  6. sloeffle

    sloeffle
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    Sorry, I didn’t reply earlier. Been in Vegas all week.

    Yeah, I thought you were adding an addition. I’m not a home building expert but I’d think you could do some kind of floating floor. Anytime you can add a thermal break between concrete that is touching the ground and X you are money ahead in the long run.
     
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  7. Highbeam

    Highbeam
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    I remodeled a garage into living space. On top of the old slab I placed plastic, 2” of foam, and then 3-6” of concrete. 2” foam on sides too. Made the floor flat and gave me insulation.

    I failed to install radiant tubing.

    That insulated slab is not cold on your feet. Pretty amazing.
     
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  8. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
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    The real question is, are you still money ahead?! ;) ;lol
     
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  9. sloeffle

    sloeffle
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    Didn’t loose a dime gambling. Lost a few dollars drinking some over priced barley pops though. :)
     
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