Is this an old Blaze King Princess and what is wrong?

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clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
Hi
This stove has no markings, no labels. After searching for a very long time online I deducted that it is likely a Blaze King

I contacted a BK dealer who thinks it is an older Blaze King Princess... about 30-40 years old.

The dealer says they talked to Blaze King after I sent photos (posted here) to them.
The result of the inquiries is not good.. Since the cracks were recently welded up without consulting the BK dealer, the stove is no longer 'certified'.
note -there is no identification or label on it, so we could not have consulted with Blaze King in advance.

This stove is to be my primary heat source, at least for now. I need your help.

I need your help (truly) to:

1. identify the specific model and locate the manual
2. figure out what parts are missing/not included and how to fix/replace/locate
3. figure out why the fire goes out whenever the door is shut. It only works with the door cracked open.
4. find out if there is a way to 're-certify' the stove (with Blaze King ?) if possible
5. Figure out how to use it properly and safely asap, as it is my primary heat source.
6. Share any other thoughts, comments, suggestions and encouragement that you want to share

Other questions:
How do we go about getting the stove re-certified before getting a WETT inspection?
Is there a specific Blaze King inspection or application process?
What does 'certified' actually mean?

Current Problem:
I've tried all the combinations I can think of with the knobs/sticks (see description) to try to make a 'damper' effect.
Nothing works. The fire always goes out after the door is shut for more than 2-5 minutes. I need to do what I can to ensure it works well and is safe, esp. using the vents/dampers properly. Thanks in advance for your ideas and suggestions.

Description:

The stove is big, curved and squat, with no identification or label on it

It took me hours of searching online for 'old wood stove, four legs' and many other search parameters before I found anything even vaguely like this stove. I can't find anything more online. It appears to be one of a kind. Note it does not have BK side
.
I'll have to keep researching on my own.
For now, I'm not lighting it because I don't like leaving the door cracked open all the time, esp. if I have to leave the cabin for a few min/hours.


Written Description
There are four short legs, with no grate and no glass. I've seen on line, this stove does not have any side plates or a front plate.
It has two large intake holes at the back - one on each side, near the bottom.

There are two small holes in the door, where perhaps a plate once hung.

There's a centred, long, rectangular box, running top-down along the back centre, with two controls on the top (rear)
There are a few subsections to it...see photos.
I can't get at it - the stove is too close to the bricks (about 6") to get a good lock or to access.

One control is a knob that turns in a bit of rotation.
It sort of feels like a damper would feel like, but I'm completely guessing.
It is on the top right side of the box (if you are looking at the stove from behind).

The other control is a straight stick that is on the left, adjacent to the aforementioned knob.
It is shaped a bit like an alan key, i.e. it has a curved end that can be turned through appr. a 180 degree rotation.
It is close to the other control so I can't figure out if it rotates any further than 180.
That's because it hits the other control stick/knob at that if I turn it clockwise.

IMG_20211201_021442_0.jpg IMG_20211201_021452_2.jpg IMG_20211201_021500_4.jpg IMG_20211201_021722_5.jpg Rear Viewed from Top R IMG_20211201_003038_3.jpg welds_20211201_003158_7.jpg
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
I don't think it can be re- UL certified. Meaning you'll have to use clearances for unlisted stoves. IF it is even legal to install this in your locality...
 
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Corey

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2005
2,682
Midwest
Just to clarify for others reading, I've never heard of 'winsock' location, but "WETT inspection" has Canadian fingerprints all over it, so normal US laws/regs may not apply.

With that said, at least in the US, seems like plenty of people do some touch-up welding on stoves. I've never heard of 're' certifying. So not sure who is telling you that, and might not hurt to get a second opinion there... but again, Canada, so maybe that is a thing.

The fact that the stove has no nameplate means it would typically be treated as an uncertified appliance, with installation rules to match. Not really sure how you'd go about changing that...especially with a stove of that age.

There are some BK gurus around here. They might chime in and give some additional help on an ID, but at best, you're getting "Someone on the internet said this is a model XXX stove and should have this nameplate" So not exactly an irrefutable chain of evidence. That is also assuming there aren't any decently (or even poorly) crafted knock off stoves which look pretty close to the 'official' model.

To discuss draft, you'd have to tell us more about your flue set-up and stove /house layout...flue height, diameter, insulation, cleaning regimen, flue cap, etc, and on the house - single story, multi story, basement install, central location, outside wall, etc.
 
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clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
"Just to clarify for others reading, I've never heard of 'winsock' location, but "WETT inspection" has Canadian fingerprints all over it, so normal US laws/regs may not apply."

I changed the location..'winsock' was a copy/paste. You're right. I'm Canadian, eh? :)

"at least in the US, seems like plenty of people do some touch-up welding on stoves. I've never heard of 're' certifying. "
"The fact that the stove has no nameplate means it would typically be treated as an uncertified appliance, with installation rules to match. Not really sure how you'd go about changing that...especially with a stove of that age"

I'll look into what the regulations are in my area for 'uncertified' appliances. Thanks for the info.

"There are some BK gurus around here. They might chime in and give some additional help on an ID, but at best, you're getting "Someone on the internet said this is a model XXX stove and should have this nameplate"
So not exactly an irrefutable chain of evidence. That is also assuming there aren't any decently (or even poorly) crafted knock off stoves which look pretty close to the 'official' model."

I hope some Gurus reply. The ' you have to replace the stove' answer is the most likely one I'll get. That's what the dealer says. Unfortunately, it is not my stove and I am a renter. The landlord doesn't know any more than I do...maybe less...and he wants me to use this stove until/unless he converts to propane heat.

"To discuss draft, you'd have to tell us more about your flue set-up and stove /house layout...flue height, diameter, insulation, cleaning regimen, flue cap, etc, and on the house - single story, multi story, basement install, central location, outside wall, etc."

I think the controls at the back might affect the draft.
Will try to get a better photo to post here soon.
There's no grate. I was going to put one in, until I read that Blaze King stoves do not have grates and should not use grates.

House:
Single Story building
Roof pitch... climb over 12" goes from 78" to 84" (6")
Type of roof - metal sheets
Ceiling is sloped -probably the same climb
Stove is against an outside wall, with stovepipe up through the ceiling
Stove pipe and chimney are straight - no elbows or curves.
I don't know if there is insulation up there..probably a little bit. There's no attic/access from the inside.

Clearance:
- rear ( to bricks/blocks ) 6"
- side 10" to wooden legs of bench/table horizontally and 18" diagonally one side and about double on the other side

Stove pipe size
- insulated portion (?) with collar 30" circumference
- lower pipe 20" circumference
hole size
- 7"? 8?
I don't know how to remove the pipe to look inside the top of the stove.

Stove & Stove Pipe:
- Floor to ceiling height 6'6" up to 7' (angle, round collar/ring over the insulated portion. no ''box' enclosure)
- Insulated stovepipe app 23" to the (sloped) ceiling. It looks like it continues up but the measuring tape doesn't fit in the hole. Given that there are dents in the insulated portion of the stovepipe, I think there may have been past chimney fires due to high heat (lumber is provided for fuel vs. logs).
- Height of unit 27.5"

Chimney & Flue
- chimney height - unknown - looks like maybe 3' to 4'? I'm too chicken to climb up onto the roof to measure, as there's no way to gri
- flue height - unknown and I don't know how to evaluate/measure
- cap was missing when I moved in, so the landlord had a friend put a flattish one on, held down with a rock for now.

Cleaning
- I recently moved here. I removed about 12" of ash, mixed with long nails and used glass/stove cleaner as well as elbow grease to remove a great deal of creosote from inside the stove and the door.
- I asked the landlord to have the chimney/flue cleaned and he says his friend did it while I was out. I believe him.
- Recently, I watched a video that shows how to clean the pipe from the inside by removing the stove pipe (I don't know how) and attaching a garbage bag to the opening, then poking the cleaning rod through the bag so the debris falls down into the bag. I don't know if I could do this in this situation.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
The landlord demanding you use a stove like that would be a concern to me. I don't know what renters protections are up there, but I'd demand in return that he show an inspection report by the authority having jurisdiction that the set up is safe and code compliant. After all, it's your possessions, including your life.

And the argument "the previous renter used it for years" does not carry water for me. IF things are not right, they are bound to go wrong at some point. You don't want that point to happen when you are around.

Also, let him pay for a fire extinguisher or two (...), smoke alarms, CO alarms (at least one on each floor - but check what the requirements are in your place).

What is behind the brick? If studs, you're too close (for an unlisted stove - no tag = "not listed", even if it had a tag before).
 
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clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
Thanks for the input.

My landlord has provided 3 fire extinguishers, a smoke detector and a carbon monoxide detector. He's welded the major cracks (he's a professional welder), had the chimney cleaned and got a cap put on. He said he knows the stovepipe needs replacing.
My landlord has come a long way from where we started. I was refusing to use the stove because I felt it was unsafe. He thought it was fine. He's come around and I'm very grateful for that.
He honestly believes the stove is safe and I am not about to argue with him.
He probably doesn't have insurance on the place
I do not have tenant insurance anymore because this place does not qualify, mainly due to it being wood heat with no backup and having an RV stove for cooking (with no vent other than opening a window) I have to assume the risk or move. Theres' no suitable place to move to that I can afford. So, I am doing what I can to reduce the risk and make it a good place to live


I'll do what it takes to make this work without sicking the authorities on my landlord. The only likely result out of that would be I'd lose my housing. That's the reality I am in right now and it is a reality for many, many people right now.
I don't know what it is like elsewhere, but here in British Columbia, tenants have very few choices. I already lost my housing twice in 2021, so I'm not about to lose this place if I can at all help it.

I really want to use wood heat at least as back up to the portable heaters. I'm very hopeful that we can find a way to make it safe to use the stove. For e.g., maybe I can put shields (asbestos boards) over the rear masonry and sides? (asbestos?). I need to figure out how to get a fire to last without leaving the door open. It looks to me like the BK features on this stove were decommissioned.
If a guru will show up here and help me figure this out, I'll be very happy (and warm).
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,474
central pa
Thanks for the input.

My landlord has provided 3 fire extinguishers, a smoke detector and a carbon monoxide detector. He's welded the major cracks (he's a professional welder), had the chimney cleaned and got a cap put on. He said he knows the stovepipe needs replacing.
My landlord has come a long way from where we started. I was refusing to use the stove because I felt it was unsafe. He thought it was fine. He's come around and I'm very grateful for that.
He honestly believes the stove is safe and I am not about to argue with him.
He probably doesn't have insurance on the place
I do not have tenant insurance anymore because this place does not qualify, mainly due to it being wood heat with no backup and having an RV stove for cooking (with no vent other than opening a window) I have to assume the risk or move. Theres' no suitable place to move to that I can afford. So, I am doing what I can to reduce the risk and make it a good place to live


I'll do what it takes to make this work without sicking the authorities on my landlord. The only likely result out of that would be I'd lose my housing. That's the reality I am in right now and it is a reality for many, many people right now.
I don't know what it is like elsewhere, but here in British Columbia, tenants have very few choices. I already lost my housing twice in 2021, so I'm not about to lose this place if I can at all help it.

I really want to use wood heat at least as back up to the portable heaters. I'm very hopeful that we can find a way to make it safe to use the stove. For e.g., maybe I can put shields (asbestos boards) over the rear masonry and sides? (asbestos?). I need to figure out how to get a fire to last without leaving the door open. It looks to me like the BK features on this stove were decommissioned.
If a guru will show up here and help me figure this out, I'll be very happy (and warm).
We really need much better pics of the stove the controls the interior etc
 

clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
Hi
This stove has no markings, no labels. After searching for a very long time online I deducted that it is likely a Blaze King

I contacted a BK dealer who thinks it is an older Blaze King Princess... about 30-40 years old.

The dealer says they talked to Blaze King after I sent photos (posted here) to them.
The result of the inquiries is not good.. Since the cracks were recently welded up without consulting the BK dealer, the stove is no longer 'certified'.
note -there is no identification or label on it, so we could not have consulted with Blaze King in advance.

This stove is to be my primary heat source, at least for now. I need your help.

I need your help (truly) to:

1. identify the specific model and locate the manual
2. figure out what parts are missing/not included and how to fix/replace/locate
3. figure out why the fire goes out whenever the door is shut. It only works with the door cracked open.
4. find out if there is a way to 're-certify' the stove (with Blaze King ?) if possible
5. Figure out how to use it properly and safely asap, as it is my primary heat source.
6. Share any other thoughts, comments, suggestions and encouragement that you want to share

Other questions:
How do we go about getting the stove re-certified before getting a WETT inspection?
Is there a specific Blaze King inspection or application process?
What does 'certified' actually mean?

Current Problem:
I've tried all the combinations I can think of with the knobs/sticks (see description) to try to make a 'damper' effect.
Nothing works. The fire always goes out after the door is shut for more than 2-5 minutes. I need to do what I can to ensure it works well and is safe, esp. using the vents/dampers properly. Thanks in advance for your ideas and suggestions.

Description:

The stove is big, curved and squat, with no identification or label on it

It took me hours of searching online for 'old wood stove, four legs' and many other search parameters before I found anything even vaguely like this stove. I can't find anything more online. It appears to be one of a kind. Note it does not have BK side
.
I'll have to keep researching on my own.
For now, I'm not lighting it because I don't like leaving the door cracked open all the time, esp. if I have to leave the cabin for a few min/hours.


Written Description
There are four short legs, with no grate and no glass. I've seen on line, this stove does not have any side plates or a front plate.
It has two large intake holes at the back - one on each side, near the bottom.

There are two small holes in the door, where perhaps a plate once hung.

There's a centred, long, rectangular box, running top-down along the back centre, with two controls on the top (rear)
There are a few subsections to it...see photos.
I can't get at it - the stove is too close to the bricks (about 6") to get a good lock or to access.

One control is a knob that turns in a bit of rotation.
It sort of feels like a damper would feel like, but I'm completely guessing.
It is on the top right side of the box (if you are looking at the stove from behind).

The other control is a straight stick that is on the left, adjacent to the aforementioned knob.
It is shaped a bit like an alan key, i.e. it has a curved end that can be turned through appr. a 180 degree rotation.
It is close to the other control so I can't figure out if it rotates any further than 180.
That's because it hits the other control stick/knob at that if I turn it clockwise.

View attachment 286853 View attachment 286854 View attachment 286855 View attachment 286856 View attachment 286857 View attachment 286858

Hi
This stove has no markings, no labels. After searching for a very long time online I deducted that it is likely a Blaze King

I contacted a BK dealer who thinks it is an older Blaze King Princess... about 30-40 years old.

The dealer says they talked to Blaze King after I sent photos (posted here) to them.
The result of the inquiries is not good.. Since the cracks were recently welded up without consulting the BK dealer, the stove is no longer 'certified'.
note -there is no identification or label on it, so we could not have consulted with Blaze King in advance.

This stove is to be my primary heat source, at least for now. I need your help.

I need your help (truly) to:

1. identify the specific model and locate the manual
2. figure out what parts are missing/not included and how to fix/replace/locate
3. figure out why the fire goes out whenever the door is shut. It only works with the door cracked open.
4. find out if there is a way to 're-certify' the stove (with Blaze King ?) if possible
5. Figure out how to use it properly and safely asap, as it is my primary heat source.
6. Share any other thoughts, comments, suggestions and encouragement that you want to share

Other questions:
How do we go about getting the stove re-certified before getting a WETT inspection?
Is there a specific Blaze King inspection or application process?
What does 'certified' actually mean?

Current Problem:
I've tried all the combinations I can think of with the knobs/sticks (see description) to try to make a 'damper' effect.
Nothing works. The fire always goes out after the door is shut for more than 2-5 minutes. I need to do what I can to ensure it works well and is safe, esp. using the vents/dampers properly. Thanks in advance for your ideas and suggestions.

Description:

The stove is big, curved and squat, with no identification or label on it

It took me hours of searching online for 'old wood stove, four legs' and many other search parameters before I found anything even vaguely like this stove. I can't find anything more online. It appears to be one of a kind. Note it does not have BK side
.
I'll have to keep researching on my own.
For now, I'm not lighting it because I don't like leaving the door cracked open all the time, esp. if I have to leave the cabin for a few min/hours.


Written Description
There are four short legs, with no grate and no glass. I've seen on line, this stove does not have any side plates or a front plate.
It has two large intake holes at the back - one on each side, near the bottom.

There are two small holes in the door, where perhaps a plate once hung.

There's a centred, long, rectangular box, running top-down along the back centre, with two controls on the top (rear)
There are a few subsections to it...see photos.
I can't get at it - the stove is too close to the bricks (about 6") to get a good lock or to access.

One control is a knob that turns in a bit of rotation.
It sort of feels like a damper would feel like, but I'm completely guessing.
It is on the top right side of the box (if you are looking at the stove from behind).

The other control is a straight stick that is on the left, adjacent to the aforementioned knob.
It is shaped a bit like an alan key, i.e. it has a curved end that can be turned through appr. a 180 degree rotation.
It is close to the other control so I can't figure out if it rotates any further than 180.
That's because it hits the other control stick/knob at that if I turn it clockwise.

View attachment 286853 View attachment 286854 View attachment 286855 View attachment 286856 View attachment 286857 View attachment 286858

controls.JPG Firebox roof.JPG Firebox.JPG Front open door.JPG Front stove.JPG rear bottom.JPG rear view from above.JPG rear.JPG Stove and pipe.JPG Stovepipe at ceiling.JPG
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
That sir is not one of our stoves. I agree, some kid built that in shop at school or a guy should have let his kid build it!
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
Child labor :p
 
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clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
It is all I've got. The guy who lived here a few years ago 'got it from somewhere' as per my landlord.
How do I make it safe and functional?

The chimney doesn't go above the roofline. That affects draft, true? What do I need to do?
 

clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
the front door has 4 holes in it which likely held a plate/id on it. The back has two large intake holes and the front has the outlflow (?) at the top (open area).
I know very little, but it looks like it is a decommissioned and modified Blaze King.
 

ABMax24

Minister of Fire
Sep 18, 2019
1,481
Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada
That's one of those cases where it's going to be cheaper to replace that stove instead of trying to do any repair work or modifications to it. No matter how much work you put into it it will never be UL certified. I'm not sure about BC, but in Alberta it's almost impossible to find an insurance company that will cover a non UL listed stove.

See what's out there for used stoves and start there. Kijiji, facebook, etc.

I'm really surprised your landlord isn't more concerned about that stove, I wonder if his insurance company knows about that stove, and knows its condition. I'd be surprised if he would be covered in the event of a stove caused house fire.
 

clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
He's not going to replace it. If he does, he will pull it out completely and put a propane space heater in here. I'd much rather use wood heat. I do not have the funds to replace it myself, at least not all at once. As mentioned above, he thinks it is ok and I was lucky he did what he did i.e. welded the cracks. Insurance is another ball of wax, and I'm reluctant to post details here. Sometimes people who are in a desperate housing situation in a crazy housing market have to make difficult choices. Sometimes you pay all your life for insurance and then when you need it most the claim gets denied. Sometimes you just do your best to make do with what you've got and do your best to be safe independent of insurers.
The cost to replace the stovepipe, stove and chimney would be about $4,000.
 

clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
He's not going to replace it. If he does, he will pull it out completely and put a propane space heater in here. I'd much rather use wood heat. I do not have the funds to replace it myself, at least not all at once. As mentioned above, he thinks it is ok and I was lucky he did what he did i.e. welded the cracks. Insurance is another ball of wax, and I'm reluctant to post details here. Sometimes people who are in a desperate housing situation in a crazy housing market have to make difficult choices. Sometimes you pay all your life for insurance and then when you need it most the claim gets denied. Sometimes you just do your best to make do with what you've got and do your best to be safe independent of insurers.
The cost to replace the stovepipe, stove and chimney would be about $4,000.
that estimate for $4k would be for a cheap stove and does not include labour.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
I understand. It's tough. If the stove is controllable (can avoid overfiring), the chimney safe (lined), you don't burn too low (creosote), and you have alarms and fire extinguisher, it might be safe enough. Though I don't like "safe enough" as it implies it can be better.

Good luck.
 
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clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
I understand. It's tough. If the stove is controllable (can avoid overfiring), the chimney safe (lined), you don't burn too low (creosote), and you have alarms and fire extinguisher, it might be safe enough. Though I don't like "safe enough" as it implies it can be better.

Good luck.
Thank you for understanding. If I can get a fire to stay going at the right heat without the door having to stay open a crack, I will buy proper logs. Right now the supply (from landlord) is a mix of lumber and cut logs...very high heat burning I think.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
"never" is too strong a word.
But it is likely that draft is negatively affected because when wind curls over the ridge of the roof and may "push" air down into the chimney. Depends on local geometry, wind direction etc.

That could also push CO (kills) into the home.

Also I think it could be unsafe in another way; you don't want hot exhaust, and in a worst case scenario embers, blowing against a roof. (I don't know how serious this last thing is in practice.)
 
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clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
Thank you. My landlord said the shield inside the firebox (see photos) - at the top - where the stovepipe starts - would prevent sparks/embers from going up the chimney. I'm skeptical.
 

clennox

New Member
Dec 1, 2021
64
British Columbia, Canada
"That could also push CO (kills) into the home."
I keep a window open a crack when the fire is going, and there are CO2 and CO detectors. The latter is placed near the floor, as CO goes downwards. It is also there as monitoring for the RV propane cookstove (no vent) and oven...another reason to keep the window cracked (and the bathroom exhaust fan going).
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
Ok. Embers are unlikely anyway. But draft issues are not. Alarms are good, needed, but they don't prevent danger.

Also, How much heat are you pumping out of the window and bathroom fan...? I mean, when I heat my home, I tell my.kids (over and over and over) to close the door, to open a bathroom window when the shower exhaust fan is on etc. I try to keep the air I warmed (at lots of labor cost cutting, splitting, stacking) in the house.

I still would suggest to see what other heat might be affordable for you as it all makes less and less sense to me.
 
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