Jotul Oslo or Hearthstone Heritage or...

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skeenut

New Member
Aug 8, 2017
22
Lafayette, NJ
Begreen asked that I start a new thread to address my stove selection.
We live in Northwestern Jersey.
By way of background: I've heated with wood for about thirty years and was always a Vermont Castings guy.
Just downsized to a 1500sf ranch with a nice open floor plan. The kitchen, dining and living room are in one great room with a cathedral ceiling that is about twelve feet at the peak. Newer Andersen five foot casement windows and two newer Anderson sliders on three walls. The bedrooms and bathrooms are off a hallway that extends to the back of the house. Standard eight foot ceilings back there.
We burn 24/7 and in years past we've used about four cords a season. The house is electric baseboard.
The house came with a nicely installed 2004 Hearthstone Heritage that had been REALLY used. Warped door, missing grate and cracked in the back.
Photo attached of dead Hearthstone in the great room:
IMG_4885.jpg
Needs replacing. So far my contenders are either a Hearthstone Heritage, a Lopi Rockport or a Jotul F500.

Well, thanks in advance for any sage advice or scoldings.
Jeff, Lafayette, NJ
 
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The F500 would do the job. For softer heat that will more closely approximate soapstone heating I would also look at the Jotul F45 while at the Jotul store. Some other cast iron clad stoves to consider would be the Enviro Boston 1700, Quadrafire Explorer II and in cat the BlazeKing Ashford 30.1.

Is there a ceiling fan in the great room? You'll want one.
 
No ceiling fan yet, but one is definitely in our near future!
We like the side load doors. All our previous stoves were VC with top loading. The East/West front loading was always comparatively awkward and a bit precarious.
 
The destruction of the heritage almost certainly had nothing to do with the stove's ability to heat the house and everything to do with the abuse of the previous owner. Now if they just wore out the hinges and latches I would say that is normal and that they were lucky to get 13 years!

The home is well within the capabilities of the hearthstone heritage and it is a nice looking stove. Over 5 years I pushed about 30 cords through the side loading door of my previous heritage from 2007 or so.

Knowing what I know now, I would not purchase another soapstone non-cat. Look at steel stoves or steel stoves clad with cast iron shell for looks. I would avoid any cast iron stove that is bolted together chunks of iron with gaskets between the chunks.

Some clues from your post lead me to believe that you are retired, experienced with wood heat, and so will be home to feed this stove as needed so a cat stove isn't the obvious best choice as it is for a guy who benefits from the very long burn times.

Your question was specific. Jotul or heritage. Go Jotul. If you are willing to consider other stoves, the non-cat cast iron clad steel stove that I like is the PE alderlea series. It's front door only but the dimensions are set to allow you to load wood straight in just as if it was a side door but even better since you don't have to worry about wood up against the window.

I would not purchase a sideways loader where you chuck wood in the loading door sideways and hope it doesn't roll out! Here's my heritage loaded through the side door fully to illustrate.
 

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No ceiling fan yet, but one is definitely in our near future!
We like the side load doors. All our previous stoves were VC with top loading. The East/West front loading was always comparatively awkward and a bit precarious.
The Jotul F45 and the Enviro Boston 1700 will load N/S. They are deeper stoves.
 
That F45 looks promising. I like that it might approximate the "softer" soapstone type heat. And that it loads North/South.
Does it have the muscle to heat a solid 1500sf? Or would I be better served with some over capacity in the F55? I sure like the cheaper price point of the F45!
 
Hey skeenut...To answer your questions from the earlier thread.I bought my used Oslo up in Binghamton NY off Craigslist for $500.It had a cracked base but also has a blower.When you factor in the blower the cost really couldn't be beat.Im located in Monmouth county near Six Flags.The rebuild wasn't to bad just some heavy lifting.Thanks to the fine folks here at the Hearth I got most info from old threads for my rebuild.My nearest Jotul dealer is about 1/2 drive and the replacement base ran about $450.I Changed all gaskets recemented all parts as necessary and have a total of about 2 hours rebuild time.All in all I have a Jotul Oslo with a blower that would cost close to $3000 new.My total with rebuild parts=$1000.Not too shabby I'd say.Good luck to you whatever choice you make!!!
 
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That F45 looks promising. I like that it might approximate the "softer" soapstone type heat. And that it loads North/South.
Does it have the muscle to heat a solid 1500sf? Or would I be better served with some over capacity in the F55? I sure like the cheaper price point of the F45!
If the place is reasonably insulated it should do the job. You're bound to have cooler bedrooms. That typical with ranch houses.
 
If the place is reasonably insulated it should do the job. You're bound to have cooler bedrooms. That typical with ranch houses.
And I've lived with that, it's actually to our liking. The electric bb can easily quickly pick up the btu slack in the bed and baths.
I think we're pulling the trigger on the f45.
Next question: pick it up on my trailer and get it into the house with a few of my closest friends and mainly younger stronger son and daughter in law or pay the exorbitant $400 for two men to deliver and put in place.
 
And I've lived with that, it's actually to our liking. The electric bb can easily quickly pick up the btu slack in the bed and baths.
I think we're pulling the trigger on the f45.
Next question: pick it up on my trailer and get it into the house with a few of my closest friends and mainly younger stronger son and daughter in law or pay the exorbitant $400 for two men to deliver and put in place.
If it was me personally I would save my $400 and pick it up on a trailer. If one of your buddies has an appliance dolly its a lot easier. If they don't you could always rent one from uhaul for like $15. I brought my englander Madison stove into the house by myself on a dolly and hooked it up. I believe it weights close to 400 lbs.
 
Hey skeenut- Good choice, the F45 is a performer. Its a steel stove with cast iron asthetics. Give her good wood to burn, she'll take care of the rest..Good luck. PS- Unless your delivery is from a long distance, 400 bucks is a bit much.
 
I always pick up and install myself. No help needed if you take your time and use brains instead of pure muscles! A little dolly cart from harbor freight is the only "tool" I've needed. No stairs for me though.
 
Picked up a Mansfield myself. The thing is 500 plus pounds. The retailer loaded it on my trailer and I strapped it down. Traveled 2 hours back home and unloaded it with a furniture dolly. Took four of us to lift it up on the raised hearth though. You can do it. Take your time and save that money.:cool:
 
Jotul . . . in the time I've been here I think I can only recall 1 or 2 folks who had a bad experience with a Jotul.

Me . . . I've been tempted with a few different makes and models over the years, but I keep coming back to the fact that my Oslo has kept this place warm since 2008 with nothing more than a routine cleaning (and I did change out some gaskets last year.)
 
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Just wanted to update. We took delivery of a new Jotul F45 today. They disappeared the Hearthstone and put the F45 in place. I "installed" it by lowering the stovepipe into it's new home in the Jotul. Done.
Pictures and burn report to come.
 
Congrats! Stay warm this winter....
 
Jotul . . . in the time I've been here I think I can only recall 1 or 2 folks who had a bad experience with a Jotul.

Me . . . I've been tempted with a few different makes and models over the years, but I keep coming back to the fact that my Oslo has kept this place warm since 2008 with nothing more than a routine cleaning (and I did change out some gaskets last year.)

Hey firefighterjake....been a few months...but I have to report my Jotul Oslo has been nothing short of KICKASS over the winter. It heated the whole 3200 sq ft. with the heating system kicking on in the A.M. only due to my laziness of not getting up at 0500 to reload...but easy enough to get it going again with a few small splits and some kindling over the coals. So, first winter was great...even though it was a bit mild. Great stove...and NO stove out there has the same beauty of the Oslo. The look is unmatched.
 
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Hey firefighterjake....been a few months...but I have to report my Jotul Oslo has been nothing short of KICKASS over the winter. It heated the whole 3200 sq ft. with the heating system kicking on in the A.M. only due to my laziness of not getting up at 0500 to reload...but easy enough to get it going again with a few small splits and some kindling over the coals. So, first winter was great...even though it was a bit mild. Great stove...and NO stove out there has the same beauty of the Oslo. The look is unmatched.

Wait a minute . . . you're a game warden . . . shouldn't you be up late at night and at the crack of dawn to catch the bad guys? ;) :)

I remember as a kid my older cousin was nearly paranoid about the local game warden catching him riding his dirt bike on the road . . . he was always convinced John Ford might be right around the corner. Of course it didn't help that my grandparents were fond of John and he would often stop by to visit them.
 
Wait a minute . . . you're a game warden . . . shouldn't you be up late at night and at the crack of dawn to catch the bad guys? ;) :)

I remember as a kid my older cousin was nearly paranoid about the local game warden catching him riding his dirt bike on the road . . . he was always convinced John Ford might be right around the corner. Of course it didn't help that my grandparents were fond of John and he would often stop by to visit them.
Ahhhh....fear of the local warden.....we count on that......for those that do the right thing when no one is looking (or think no one is looking) makes a warden smile inside. Even if it was simply to avoid getting scooped for a violation.
 
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Ahhhh....fear of the local warden.....we count on that......for those that do the right thing when no one is looking (or think no one is looking) makes a warden smile inside. Even if it was simply to avoid getting scooped for a violation.

I've had very good interactions with game wardens here in Maine. On the sled, ATV, etc. (I don't hunt, fish or trap so no interactions there) and have always enjoyed stopping to talk with the wardens . . . especially when they can offer some solid advice on which trails to take or not take. Only had one warden who I did not like . . . of course this instant dislike occurred when I invited him to a meeting of our local ATV Club to simply meet some of our members and his response was "I hate ATVs. I really don't like dealing with ATVs at all." Needless to say he never stopped by . . .

His loss. I'm actually quite proud of our club members who have managed to help partially curb some troublesome areas with kids speeding and hot dogging . . . reopened a trail closed down after the landowner found trash there from a pick up (this was obvious due to the sheer amount and type of trash) . . . and have had business owners personally thank us for the bit of extra business ATVers on trails and access roads into town have brought to them.
 
I've had very good interactions with game wardens here in Maine. On the sled, ATV, etc. (I don't hunt, fish or trap so no interactions there) and have always enjoyed stopping to talk with the wardens . . . especially when they can offer some solid advice on which trails to take or not take. Only had one warden who I did not like . . . of course this instant dislike occurred when I invited him to a meeting of our local ATV Club to simply meet some of our members and his response was "I hate ATVs. I really don't like dealing with ATVs at all." Needless to say he never stopped by . . .

His loss. I'm actually quite proud of our club members who have managed to help partially curb some troublesome areas with kids speeding and hot dogging . . . reopened a trail closed down after the landowner found trash there from a pick up (this was obvious due to the sheer amount and type of trash) . . . and have had business owners personally thank us for the bit of extra business ATVers on trails and access roads into town have brought to them.
I understand his hating DEALING with atv's....the complaints...the constant nonconformists....and the courts don't care (until it's there peace and quiet that's disrupted by constant nonconformists). The warden doesn't hate atv'rs...it's the frustrating part of the job where there is no REAL solution....one can try to educate....public relations...enforcement- heavy or not....but the problem nonconformists just never stop. I personally love it...used to race motocross...but the laws where I'm from basically shut it down. Not cool. Necessary evil of the job I guess. Fish and game is where most of us live and love....to deal with nonconformist ohv's only pulls us from what we love...thus the somewhat inaccurate phrase...I hate ATV's...he simply hates to always beat the dead horse. Clubs are where good things start and thrive.
 
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Ok. Burn report.
Did the requisite three break-in burns using a magnetic stove top thermometer to monitor temps. Outdoors temps have been oddly warm during the day and down into the 40's and upper 30's at night. One frost. So no opportunities to test sustained burn times yet.
The stove and installation are great performers so far! Easy to start with proper kindling. And quick to reach operating temps of 400 to 600 degrees. Almost too quick. Today I started a fire with two splits, some kindling on wadded newspaper in between the splits, and then three more splits crossed on top of it all with two more on top of them. Single match start, door left cracked and damper wide open. After about five minutes had some nice flames and crackling, popping wood. Shut the door and slightly closed the damper. Everything slowed WAY down, so I opened the damper all the way, left the door closed. About five minutes later the fire was well established so I shut the damper about halfway. Five minutes later fire was more robust and stove top was at 600. Shut the damper to about one quarter open. A few minutes later the temp is over 700. Shut the damper all the way. Now I'm hovering over the thermometer and the temp is climbing fast. Temperature gets over 800 in another few minutes. I take action by opening the door to introduce some colder air and knock the log-cabin type structure down to reduce the surface area available to combust. Stove stays over 800 for about half an hour, but the fire backs way down visually. Temp starts to drop to about 650 after 45 minutes and is now about 450 after an hour. Damper all the way closed and a nice bed of coals.
Should have not built a fire with so much potential. It suddenly caught and EVERYTHING was burning. Should have established a smaller, controlled fire and gradually added to it. AND should have closed the damper down MUCH earlier.
This stove wants to burn!
Lessons learned.
 
Well, guess the paint is baked in now. :cool:

Try a totally N/S load next time with little space between the splits.
 
Yes, it's definitely baked on!
Next burn I'll try this. Two splits N/S with some paper and kindling in between. Another split on top of the kindling, also N/S. Light that and get it established so it'll burn nicely with a closed door and about 1/4 to 1/3 open damper. Then add three more splits, also N/S, adjust damper to get them going. And keep the stovetop under 700, preferably about 500 to 600.
That's the plan anyway.
 
So, trying the new start method right now.
5 minutes, closed the door.
12 minutes, still wide open damper, about 100 degrees.
15 minutes, added three splits.
20 to 45 minutes, idling along about 200 degrees, still wide open
60 minutes, fire visibly getting more robust, appears to be some secondary combustion. Temp rising to about 275. Shut down halfway.
Hour and 15 minutes temp up to 350, damper still halfway open. Some secondary, nice controlled looking burn. Shutting down to 1/4 open.
Hour and 30 minutes, temp holding at 350. Very slow, ember kind of burn. Few flames. Still 1/4 open.
Hour and 45 minutes, 350, added three splits, shut door, left damper at 1/4.
4 hours later, stove it at 375. Have a nice thick bed of embers and still about 1/4 worth of the wood left. Has been easy to move the temp around, up to 650 and back down to 350 using the damper.
I'm liking this stove. It sure wants to burn. It was easy to get it from 350 or so up to over 600 FAST with significant secondary burn kicking in quickly and hard. Slower to get it back down, but I could. It's controllable and once I learn it I'm sure it will be predictable.