Suggestions on a new wood stove with catalyst

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ChrisMac

New Member
Dec 1, 2023
4
Rhode Island
Hello all, we currently have a Jotul firelight 12 that’s no longer working well. We’ve decided not to dump $1100 into a new catalyst chamber and other necessary components because it’s over 20 years old and there’s some parts that are no longer available. As well as during a deep cleaning we discovered lots of concrete has broken away as seams. Even with the doors open it doesn’t get to temp.
So anyway, we have looked at the Jotul F500 V3 Oslo, but have read that because of the no bypass feature the cat doesn’t hold up.
What is the best wood stove with a catalyst that has little to no known issues?
 
Why do you want a cat stove? Can Describe your house heating demands, and current chimney system?

To answer your question Blaze King Ashford would be my choice.
 
Why a cat stove? If you prefer Jotul look at the F45 or F55.
 
Preston Trading Post is a rep for BK, take a look at Woodstock stoves sold direct out of NH; both have great products. The CAT gives me a wider burn season than I had with my non-cat.
 
Preston Trading Post is a rep for BK, take a look at Woodstock stoves sold direct out of NH; both have great products. The CAT gives me a wider burn season than I had with my non-cat.
Yea that’s where I was going for my Jotul parts. What do you mean by wider burn season? Our firelight was great for a few years w a new catalyst, but it’s old and not well designed.
We use it as our primary heat and have a large ceiling, so a wood stove w a cat is ideal. A wood stove without a cat would have to be stoked more often whereas a cat you can get a longer burn time, so less wood is used essentially.
 
I use my non cat as my primary heat source and have high ceilings as well. No problem burning low and slow during shoulder seasons with 12+ hour burns. It’s debatable wether you would go through less wood with a cat over a good non cat.
 
I have a VC catalog here and it claims 15% higher efficiency on low burns with the catalyst. Their graph shows as you increase the burn rate to about 50% all of that advantage goes away.
 
I would take anything form a VC catalog with a grain of salt, however in my opinion(take that for what its worth...) Cat stoves are always going to be there most efficient on a low burn, while a tube stove with be its most at a higher burn. If you need a lot of heat the tube stove will win. If you need a very low amount of heat the cat will win. Both are going to be good stoves as long as its a good brand and design. If my demand was higher I would prob switch to a tube stove on my next stove, but since i never burn above the lowest setting no need and I get very very long burns out of it.
 
I would take anything form a VC catalog with a grain of salt
I agree, the 15% is probably not accurate so the advantage is not much. No real savings since the cat is a maintenance item.
 
Yea that’s where I was going for my Jotul parts. What do you mean by wider burn season? Our firelight was great for a few years w a new catalyst, but it’s old and not well designed.
We use it as our primary heat and have a large ceiling, so a wood stove w a cat is ideal. A wood stove without a cat would have to be stoked more often whereas a cat you can get a longer burn time, so less wood is used essentially.
In the spring & fall I can lower the burn rate to not overheat, when it gets cold I can push it harder and still get long reload times.
 
Cat stoves are always going to be there most efficient on a low burn, while a tube stove with be its most at a higher burn.
Actually all modern stoves whether cat or non cat are most efficient with their lower burn rates.
 
Actually all modern stoves wether cat or non cat are most efficient with their lower burn rates.
I agree however most cat stoves lower burn rate is lower then a tube stoves. And a tube stove burns better at a higher rate then a cat stove. And a tube stove is going to outperform a cat stove at a higher rate.
 
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Just a couple of numbers from published test reports to make the point for Rickb.
 

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Just a couple of numbers from published test reports to make the point for Rickb.
Sorry BKPV, I didnt mean efficiency. I agree with those numbers. I meant raw fast heat on high. All the tube stoves I have seen produce more heat. But they do it using a lot more wood. Again my stove is on lowest setting as soon as the bypass closes and then I use a fan for an hour to bring my room up to temp. I never need more then that other then if its under 20F out might need to run the fan for a little longer.
 
Just a couple of numbers from published test reports to make the point for Rickb.
What stove is the other one?
 
Previous thread from another 12 owner looking to upgrade you can check out in the meantime: https://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/time-for-an-upgrade.198325/

Top load is very nice but it is time to put that 12 to bed and get something newer, trying to rebuild those things is hit or miss with finding parts.
I just put a new back plate and cover plate on about a month ago, but yea it’s time.
Has anyone noticed a difference in stove pricing in spring vs. winter?
 
Has anyone noticed a difference in stove pricing in spring vs. winter?
If you are looking for used, yes you can find deals in the spring/summer. On new stoves it is hit or miss, depends on the popularity of the stove. If you want a cheap no thrills steel stove you can find closeout specials at the big box stores in the spring.