Wood ID please

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WoodBurnerInWI

Feeling the Heat
Feb 2, 2020
281
Madison, WI
I'm about halfway done splitting my recent delivery of logs from the tree guy and I've encountered several rounds that don't appear to be elm.

They are extremely heavy, my moisture meter reads OL when tested so they're over 50% moisture at the moment, and the splits smell VERY strongly of manure. It's not any kind of oak or red oak as there's no medullary rays on the end grains and the wood grain itself looks nothing like oak. Please see photos and help me ID these stinky logs!

20200516_172141.jpg 20200516_172224.jpg 20200516_172236.jpg 20200516_172300.jpg 20200516_172311.jpg 20200516_172321.jpg 20200516_172339.jpg
 

fbelec

Minister of Fire
Nov 23, 2005
3,544
Massachusetts
the last one looks similar to some walnut i had but it didn't smell.
the second to the last looks like catulpa i had not long ago and that stuff smelt strong even
after drying and burning it
 

PA. Woodsman

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2007
2,257
Emmaus, Pennsylvania
The only woods that I ever encountered that smell like manure are Oak and Hickory, might be one of those, and they are both heavy especially when green!
 

TreePointer

Minister of Fire
Sep 22, 2010
3,122
PA
When I hear "stinky" when someone is describing firewood, I immediately think of two species in my area.

One is red oak. The stinky version still has a lot of the the typical oak smell, but there's a strong manure scent on top of it. This is caused by a fungus. I most often run into this with pin oaks.

The other is red elm (aka slippery elm). Some red elm will stink up the entire area as soon as I cut into it.
 

CincyBurner

Minister of Fire
Mar 10, 2015
765
SW Ohio
Looks like slippery (red) elm to me. I don't see/ burn much slippery elm around Cincinnati (lLots of Siberian elm, which can be stinky).
Is it all the same wood ?
 
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TreePointer

Minister of Fire
Sep 22, 2010
3,122
PA
Looks like slippery (red) elm to me. I don't see/ burn much slippery elm around Cincinnati (lLots of Siberian elm, which can be stinky).
Is it all the same wood ?

I forgot about Siberian elm.

Around here, the elms I run into are almost always white elms, so I'm rusty on spotting differences between red and Siberian.
 

WoodBurnerInWI

Feeling the Heat
Feb 2, 2020
281
Madison, WI
Well the guy did tell me it was elm, what threw me off was the lack of stringiness in the splits. The rounds I was cutting just before I got to the mystery rounds had plenty of stringiness to them and were a PITA to get through even with the splitter so I was thinking that's the elm! The bark on these mystery splits is also somewhat "hairy" on the backside, especially if it's come off the split.

Thanks to everyone who's replied thus far! This wood is being stacked in a bin that will eventually be full of wood that needs 2 plus years to dry.
 

hickoryhoarder

Minister of Fire
Apr 5, 2013
740
Indiana
My guess from the photos is red elm. I don't know what is smells like fresh cut.
 

tadmaz

Minister of Fire
Dec 21, 2017
500
Erin, WI
I've had some stringy elm, but I've also had elm split just fine. American elm and rock elm seem to be the most stringy, with red elm being the least. This could be rock elm maybe? Or red.