Zero clearance 2021 tax credit approved

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Kmr1983

New Member
Feb 8, 2021
7
Central WA
Hello, new here. New to wood stoves as well. We're just starting to build a new house, and want to put a wood burner in. It will be going in an alcove. However, we don't want the mantle higher than 5' from the floor. I see most free standing stoves require 7' for an alcove opening. Or, how do you make a non combustible ceiling in an alcove? Lopi wants a masonry ceiling. Leaning towards a zero clearance insert because of that. Also we want a burner that will qualify us for the tax credit. Sorry for the rambles. Any ideas or options are appreciated!

Kent
 

john26

Minister of Fire
Oct 27, 2008
763
Wildwood MO
I have only found 2 fireplaces that qualify, the Superior WCT6940 and the Montecito Estate they are both made by IHP and have a catalyst.
 

Kmr1983

New Member
Feb 8, 2021
7
Central WA
Screenshot_20210209-080227_Drive.jpg

Came across this. Are the medium and large flush inserts zero clearance?
 

john26

Minister of Fire
Oct 27, 2008
763
Wildwood MO
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avsmusic1

Burning Hunk
Jul 26, 2012
218
CT
View attachment 274112
Came across this. Are the medium and large flush inserts zero clearance?
those are also old models - the hybrid fyre is the design prior to the current iteration (they took out the cat) and you'd be hard pressed to find one. The new model doesn't qualify

I've heard whispers that Travis is looking to reintroduce the cat but that may just be internet chatter
 

Kmr1983

New Member
Feb 8, 2021
7
Central WA
So it looks like zero clearance really lowers my options. If I do a non combustible alcove, what are some reasonable recommendations on how to build the ceiling? My mason says it would be fairly expensive to do it with brick, because I want the alcove ceiling flat. Any free standing options that don't require masonry ceiling for an alcove?
 

avsmusic1

Burning Hunk
Jul 26, 2012
218
CT
So it looks like zero clearance really lowers my options. If I do a non combustible alcove, what are some reasonable recommendations on how to build the ceiling? My mason says it would be fairly expensive to do it with brick, because I want the alcove ceiling flat. Any free standing options that don't require masonry ceiling for an alcove?
This probably goes w/out saying but the cost of a special alcove build could offset the tax credit
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,855
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Can’t you just screw cement board to the ceiling, skim coat of mud, and paint it?

Non combustible doesn’t mean masonry.
 

Kmr1983

New Member
Feb 8, 2021
7
Central WA
With the alcove the wife gets the brick look and mantle that she wants, and I get the free standing wood stove that I want.

The stove we're considering (lopi evergreen) says specifically that it has to be 3.5" of masonry, spaced 1" off of combustibles.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,855
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
With the alcove the wife gets the brick look and mantle that she wants, and I get the free standing wood stove that I want.

The stove we're considering (lopi evergreen) says specifically that it has to be 3.5" of masonry, spaced 1" off of combustibles.

That spec in your last sentence is right out of the fire code for the back wall. I’ve never seen it required for the ceiling. It doesn’t pass the sniff test.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,855
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA

Thank you for that. You read it right and I can see why it was written that way to address putting that stove in an old fireplace. I looked up alcove in the dictionary and it is:

"An alcove is a small area of a room that is formed by one part of a wall being built further back than the rest of the wall."

So you don't want a typical alcove, you want to build something that looks like a masonry fireplace and put the stove inside. Why don't you put the mantle at 5' but have the actual ceiling of the combustible alcove up at 84" or at full ceiling height?

I would skip the mantle and go 84" if I was you.

alcove.jpg
 

Kmr1983

New Member
Feb 8, 2021
7
Central WA
Thank you for that. You read it right and I can see why it was written that way to address putting that stove in an old fireplace. I looked up alcove in the dictionary and it is:

"An alcove is a small area of a room that is formed by one part of a wall being built further back than the rest of the wall."

So you don't want a typical alcove, you want to build something that looks like a masonry fireplace and put the stove inside. Why don't you put the mantle at 5' but have the actual ceiling of the combustible alcove up at 84" or at full ceiling height?

I would skip the mantle and go 84" if I was you.

View attachment 274218
The wife wants to put pictures and such on the mantle. If they don't fall off the back of the mantle, combustibles are still too close to the stove. Unless the mantle is at 84". But the mantle at 84" is pointless to me.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
94,486
South Puget Sound, WA
There is a thread on non-combustible mantels that may be helpful. There are some that are very realistic.
 

Kmr1983

New Member
Feb 8, 2021
7
Central WA
There is a thread on non-combustible mantels that may be helpful. There are some that are very realistic.

We have thought about that, but then picture frames on the mantle can't happen. Wood frames=combustibles
 

ColdIsland

New Member
Sep 11, 2021
3
San Juan Islands
I have only found 2 fireplaces that qualify, the Superior WCT6940 and the Montecito Estate they are both made by IHP and have a catalyst.
It's kind of crazy these are the only ones that qualify, they're so massive! I'd jump at the chance to get a medium or small ZC that qualified, but 4 sqft of firebox is too much for most people.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
94,486
South Puget Sound, WA
There are several nice ZC fireplaces in the 2-3 cu ft range made in Canada. RSF, SBI, Pacific Energy make good ones.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
94,486
South Puget Sound, WA
We have thought about that, but then picture frames on the mantle can't happen. Wood frames=combustibles
This shouldn't be an issue if they are on top of and shielded by the non-combustible mantel.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
94,486
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, but they don't seem to qualify for the biomass credit, paying 26% more doesn't give me the warm fuzzies, lol!
In the other thread you are looking at freestanding stoves. Do they qualify? Sometimes everything doesn't align. People still buy Teslas even though they no longer qualify for the $7500 credit.