10 Cord Wood Shed Finished!

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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
Nice!

I'd cross stack the edges of your stacks to avoid them leaning too much on the boards.

Also, screws are less strong than nails. (Hence no screws in e.g. framing of homes.)
 

jwoair23

Feeling the Heat
Oct 2, 2011
279
Ohio
Nice!

I'd cross stack the edges of your stacks to avoid them leaning too much on the boards.

Also, screws are less strong than nails. (Hence no screws in e.g. framing of homes.)
Do you think I should go back through and add some nails to each board? Or will three two inch screws per post, so 9 screws per board be enough?
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
Depends on how far the boards will bend; screws do fair when being pulled straight, but poorly when shear forces are present. If the boards bow out a lot, more shear forces appear.

I'd add a 3" nail every where you have screws there to take the shear forces

Maybe the boards would crack first then...
 

FTG-05

Feeling the Heat
Feb 8, 2014
410
TN
For my 2nd wood shed, I used formerly owned pallets for the floor. Just like the #1 wood shed, I put that black weed block down first. This provides some protection against ground moisture and keeps the weeds down.

Nice looking wood shed: Looking forward to seeing it full!
 

jwoair23

Feeling the Heat
Oct 2, 2011
279
Ohio
that was my first thought too
I can take a measuring tape out and take pictures if anyone needs proof 😄😁This weekend we moved about 5-5.5 cords in the right hand side, it is 10 feet deep, 10 feet wide, and 7-7.5 feet tall of firewood densely packed.

I have to admit, I never would have thought this would fit ten cords either, but its incredible how many cords fit into a dense cube.
 

mpaul

Member
I’m thinking about building something similar. Are there any concerns with the stuff in the middle not seasoning well because it’s not getting as much exposure to the elements?
Are your rows densely packed or are you leaving some space for air circulation?
 

FTG-05

Feeling the Heat
Feb 8, 2014
410
TN
I’m thinking about building something similar. Are there any concerns with the stuff in the middle not seasoning well because it’s not getting as much exposure to the elements?
Are your rows densely packed or are you leaving some space for air circulation?
I dense pack my 3 cords bays. Never had a problem with drying.

Having said that: My woods sheds get lots of winds plus the firewood I'm using now was put up by March 2016.
 
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Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,679
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Sorry I'm late to the thread but I built one that is very similar and the only thing I thought of right away was the sides have no bracing. In the rear you put in those diagonals, the sides would benefit from them too.

Then you could have painted the shed before filling it. I like stain or paint to protect the wood and keep it looking nice.

I do like how you added posts to the center of the three short walls. I spanned the 10 feet with 2x6 horizontals and I think intermediate posts would be a help.

Mine is the same shape too and to avoid side forces from the wood to the walls I stack a row down all four sides. then fill in the middle with 6 rows. All four corners get a cribbed stack. Wood shrinks a lot as it dries, you'll be able to see that now.

On edit, screws are very strong. No need to fret. Just like nails, you can buy strong screws or weak screws. To really worry or be critical of the screw choice you would need to know the specific screws and nails to compare. I used a lot of screws too. The reason they frame houses with nails is cost. Labor and materials cost is lower when spitting nails from a nail gun.
 
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jwoair23

Feeling the Heat
Oct 2, 2011
279
Ohio
Today we got the rest of the firewood moved into the shed, moved about a half cord onto the covered front porch too. Feels great to have all the wood under a roof! Also went through and added three inch nails to all the side cladding to strengthen it just in case in addition to the screws.

226BA192-C37A-473C-9CB6-705D50B1A3DC.jpeg DB4DCD46-8E13-4CC1-92A1-E000A94D2541.jpeg
 

CatfishHunter

Member
Dec 8, 2020
62
Minnesota
As for using pallets that need to be replaced, a solution may be to use rocks. I live in a rocky area where this is easier, but I find flat or mostly flat rocks and put them on the ground. My first row of wood goes on the rocks. Think of it like laying pavers. Rocks do not rot after several years so will never need to be replaced!
 

fire_man

Minister of Fire
Feb 6, 2009
2,655
North Eastern MA
Why did you sink the posts in concrete instead of using steel anchor plates? Your method seems more cost effective.
Was it hard to plumb the long heavy posts?
 

jwoair23

Feeling the Heat
Oct 2, 2011
279
Ohio
Why did you sink the posts in concrete instead of using steel anchor plates? Your method seems more cost effective.
Was it hard to plumb the long heavy posts?
No reason for the concrete other than that's what I was familiar with! It wasn't too difficult to plumb them, we laid out the grid with string and extra stakes (copied what we saw them doing when they built our pole barn) and were able to get it fairly square keeping the posts flush against the string. Then as we filled in the concrete dirt just kept checking the level. I am sure its not "perfect", but its so close you wouldn't notice and came out pretty square when we put the roof on.
 
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snobuilder

Feeling the Heat
Dec 16, 2021
431
WI
Looks great.
I have front and back open sides because my pile builds over time and the stuff in the back (so to speak) will be the first I will want to use as it has been drying the longest.
 

Isaac Carlson

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2012
700
NW Wisconsin
This just gives me more drive to get mine done. I was supposed to do it last year.....
I have also been looking at your pictures every few days. Looks great!
 

shoot-straight

Minister of Fire
Jan 5, 2012
770
Kennedyville, MD
Very nice looking shed. I have similar, but 8x8 bays. Made 3 then added a 4th. I loosely stack enough wood for one season in 2, then have the other 2 for the following year. Always stay ahead 2 years that way. Wood dries pretty good but you have to stack it loose, lots of air gaps.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,532
07462
Very nice looking shed. I have similar, but 8x8 bays. Made 3 then added a 4th. I loosely stack enough wood for one season in 2, then have the other 2 for the following year. Always stay ahead 2 years that way. Wood dries pretty good but you have to stack it loose, lots of air gaps.
I notice with my shed I will stack right to the very top and 2 years later when I'm ready to burn it, everything has settled / shrunk a good 5-10" lower then the main beam on top
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
Yes, same here. For the pine that I stacked last summer, I already gained about 3". (Pine going faster than the oak, of course, and possibly shrinking more in total too.)
 

FTG-05

Feeling the Heat
Feb 8, 2014
410
TN
A little air space in the stacks helps with drying in my shed but I don’t leave any space between the rows and can absolutely state for fact that it does not hinder the seasoning in the center of the shed.
I do the same thing. I'm not spending all that time, money and time to build an air shed. I want it to store firewood. I fill it to the brim. When I need it, it will be dry.

Caveat: Any wood I put up, I don't need for at least five years. :)

Looks good OP! 🍻
 
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