2020-21 Blaze King Performance Thread (Everything BK)

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
18,860
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
It’s not so much the peak daytime highs. There are lots of ways to deal with that. It’s the nighttime lows when it stays hot overnight. Uncomfortable sleep is pretty miserable. Ceiling fans help tremendously.

That Rv is in an insulated shop that is only about 80 so the RV cooled itself to 68 in two hours. I’m sitting outside by a mister right now watching the sunset that is especially orange due to the trapped pollution.
47395377-8E5B-4C0C-99B0-82F8CD566179.jpeg
 

ABMax24

Minister of Fire
Yeah that's our issue too, normally night time temps drop enough that opening the windows at night keeps the house cool, not so much right now, at almost 11pm it's still 30C (86F) outside, far too warm to open the windows. We had a 2 ton AC unit installed it our house, which should be slightly oversized for our climate, the poor thing has ran the last 8 hours continuously, but the house is comfortable. It's better than our RV, it's AC would never keep up in these temperatures.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Highbeam

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,198
South Puget Sound, WA
Got down to 66F last night here as cool marine air finally rolled in. That not only cooled sleeping air, but also the mass of the house. All slept well and I managed to catch up on some garden work this morning. I closed the windows around 9am and the house is holding the cool much better. This afternoon will be indoors bottling beer, but it's still about 10º cooler than yesterday which is a blessing.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
937
Eastern Long Island NY
Shameless copying here (tho only 2.6 cords per bay, but that's enough for me). Just asked my tree guy to bring me more. Gotta fill that thing. That is 22-23 in the middle, 23-24 on the right. 24-25 will be on the left. (21-22 is under tarps closer to the garage they which I bring it into the basement, didn't want to restack also that).

Other than that, no freezer, no ice. 92 outside, but I like the taste of my drink nonetheless
 

Attachments

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,776
07462
Got down to 66F last night here as cool marine air finally rolled in. That not only cooled sleeping air, but also the mass of the house. All slept well and I managed to catch up on some garden work this morning. I closed the windows around 9am and the house is holding the cool much better. This afternoon will be indoors bottling beer, but it's still about 10º cooler than yesterday which is a blessing.
I've been waiting so long for this, especially on a bk thread.... BG please stay on topic here...lolololololol, actually, good for you guys getting cooler weather, I often wonder with super hot weather like this that objects like firewood warming and expanding faster will dry out faster, have a beer for me and think about that and weather if the expansion / contraction helps / aids with seasoning.
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
830
NW Ontario
perhaps a silly question, but can you fellas tell me - is this discolouration on the sticker on the top of the air inlet cover normal or an indication of too hot?
 

Attachments

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
937
Eastern Long Island NY
I see the same. Not as "bad" but I've only had one season with this stove...
I do hope it's normal...
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
830
NW Ontario
I see the same. Not as "bad" but I've only had one season with this stove...
I do hope it's normal...
ya i'm inclined to think it's normal, given the location and proximity to 'hot' :)

always nice to be reassured by others though
 

BKinger

Member
Nov 11, 2018
9
NL, Canada
Anyone replace any of the bricks yet? I have an Ashford 30.2 and a few broken fire bricks that I need to change out. They seem to be in there pretty tight and wondering if there is a process to this.
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
Anyone replace any of the bricks yet? I have an Ashford 30.2 and a few broken fire bricks that I need to change out. They seem to be in there pretty tight and wondering if there is a process to this.
First, if they are still tight fitting, you need not replace them if they are bottom bricks. If they are side bricks, then that is up to you.they slide out to ends or corners. Should be straight forward once you remove 1 brick nearest a corner.
 

BKinger

Member
Nov 11, 2018
9
NL, Canada
First, if they are still tight fitting, you need not replace them if they are bottom bricks. If they are side bricks, then that is up to you.they slide out to ends or corners. Should be straight forward once you remove 1 brick nearest a corner.
Thanks BKVP, I have a couple of side bricks that are broken and the top half will not stay in place so I will need to change those out. As for the bottom ones, they are still in great shape. I am planning on using the regular firebrick that is available at any local hardware store and will cut them myself. Hope this will be ok?
 
  • Like
Reactions: BKVP

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,198
South Puget Sound, WA
Could you swap positions and put the cracked side bricks on the stove floor?
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
Could you swap positions and put the cracked side bricks on the stove floor?
Some side bricks are cut narrow and also tampered. He can buy pumice type brick locally or through a dealer. He need not spend extra just to get the high density bricks used in secondary combustion units. Maybe he'll get lucky and the damaged brick is the same size as a bottom brick....
 

BKinger

Member
Nov 11, 2018
9
NL, Canada
Some side bricks are cut narrow and also tampered. He can buy pumice type brick locally or through a dealer. He need not spend extra just to get the high density bricks used in secondary combustion units. Maybe he'll get lucky and the damaged brick is the same size as a bottom brick....
The damaged bricks are completely broken in half and I think they are too damaged to use elsewhere in the stove. Are the original bricks different than the pumice style ones that are available in most hardware stores?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,198
South Puget Sound, WA
Most hardware stores have heavier clay firebricks. Pumice firebrick is less common (and more expensive). Looking at the diagram I see that the Ashford has 6 different sizes of fire brick and that the side and floor bricks are not the same size.
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
The damaged bricks are completely broken in half and I think they are too damaged to use elsewhere in the stove. Are the original bricks different than the pumice style ones that are available in most hardware stores?
We use pumice bricks. We eliminate particulates chemically (catalyst) and do not use or need dense brick often found in thermal elimination designs. Both will work.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,198
South Puget Sound, WA
So changing out the bricks to ordinary lumberyard firebrick will not change the burn characteristics or tested emissions or UL certification?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Highbeam

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
18,860
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
So changing out the bricks to ordinary lumberyard firebrick will not change the burn characteristics or tested emissions or UL certification?
Great question. We’ve been led to believe that replacing those fancy pumice bricks with the common denser lumberyard brick would void your UL listing making a fire in your home be not covered by insurance. I would prefer to use common dense brick if this is not the case.
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
Great question. We’ve been led to believe that replacing those fancy pumice bricks with the common denser lumberyard brick would void your UL listing making a fire in your home be not covered by insurance. I would prefer to use common dense brick if this is not the case.
We like to sell our own bricks for certain. Our brick are manufactured in Oregon and we've used them for decades. We did at one time manufacture a secondary combustion model and in that model we used the more dense (for thermal assistance) bricks. Also U.L. is only one of about 6 safety test agencies. Few folks use U.L. in our stove industry, most use OMNI, PFS-Teco, Interteck Warnock Hersey etc. The actual brick density is not measured during safety tests for our units.

With a combustor being used, we don't require the thermal assistance provided by the more dense bricks. As to cost, I have often found our pumice bricks to be less costly than the more dense bricks. I guess it depends upon where you are looking. As to warranty in our stoves, you can use either.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Highbeam

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,198
South Puget Sound, WA
Locally, a typical lumberyard firebrick goes for $2-3. A pumice brick goes for $5-10 (online vs dealer). When one multiplies these times say 12 bricks, the $5-7/per brick difference adds up quickly. How much does a BK 9"x4.5"x 1.25" pumice brick sell for?
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
Locally, a typical lumberyard firebrick goes for $2-3. A pumice brick goes for $5-10 (online vs dealer). When one multiplies these times say 12 bricks, the $5-7/per brick difference adds up quickly. How much does a BK 9"x4.5"x 1.25" pumice brick sell for?
We don't sell retail. So a dealer could provide definitive pricing.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,198
South Puget Sound, WA
Well I tried, but none of the 3 dealers I called stocked them. 2 of the dealers said they only replace them with standard ceramic bricks.
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
Well I tried, but none of the 3 dealers I called stocked them. 2 of the dealers said they only replace them with standard ceramic bricks.
Does your PE use pumice bricks? Anyway, we would think the retail would be just over $6.00/brick. If you can purchase the dense brick for $2-$3, that, as I pointed out to Highbeam, is fine to use in our stoves. You might ask PE if that is what you wish to do with your Alderlea.