Cancelled my stove and switched to J.A. Roby Sirius

Mainely Saws

Feeling the Heat
Jan 11, 2010
316
Topsham , Me.
A number of folks start out thinking of having an emergency use / occasional use wood stove only to find out later that they like it so much that it becomes a regular daily routine ..........
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
I have a feeling that I am going to really like it once I learn how to do all of this and I will take it day by day for that's all I have to plan for at my age. I am going to try to move that air brenndatomu just like you say and at least get some type of air movement that goes into the house which is not large maybe 23 x 23 about I guess (can't figure)(500sq feet) or something and if need be I will open up the windows to get some colder air in to push it as well. I can have my pigeons in the loft at the back of my yard "flap" their wings to move the air up front. lol. We will see how this all works for I need to use this in practice . I need to get dry seasoned wood too . I can work on this and the wood shed until the stove is able to be installed. I will take pictures of this activity that will start on April 12th when they lay the concrete for the porch.. So now I am resting and enjoying your little postings. I am thinking of lighting the stove for the first time when it is installed with Chris ( the installer) showing me what to do and how.. I wonder if brickwork instead of tile work might be better for this stove maybe to hold heat or reflect it away. I need to check this out to see which one would be better and pretty too.. (we must not forget pretty) lol Thanks everyone.....clancey..
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
So this is how I am figuring to put the wood stove at a angle like the box is set up on the outside of the house in the porch area.
That angle would face the inside of the kitchen as well as the two wooden entrances that goes to the other 2 rooms. Next looking from inside to outside towards the window and door would it be beneficial to put a slider in that area so that I can get heat to the house from my J.A. Roby Sirius wood cook stove..It is 31 inches high about and that table is 30 inches and the box is in position at the right angle.. This is the question of this day and do you still think it might be too hot of a burn and could I transfer that heat into my main house consisting of what you see--poor folk here--me....clancey...Thanks..
 

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,319
South Puget Sound, WA
There's no need to angle the stove. Its hearth will take up a bit more room that way and there will be little to no gain from a heating standpoint. The most efficient way to have the stove share the heat with the house is to place a fan in the kitchen side, low or on the floor, blowing the cooler house air into the hotter porch area. The displaced cool air will be replaced by warmer air at the top of the door opening. That table fan running on low speed would work fine. No need for a patio door, it's the opening size between the rooms that matters. If the patio door opening is 36" then it is no more effective than a standard 36" door left open.
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
What a great idea but I am figuring different now and this is me is such a beautiful stove---I love it.. Cannot help myself...lol I might want to learn to supplement heat in my house and burn my stove more often as well. So ---Take a guess----" I am going to tear that back wall down where the door and the window is and make my stove part of my house. This will give me a area of 12 feet across and 5 foot down towards the yard.. Only this short is because of the low ceiling and this is where I must stop for a tall person to walk down steps to clear the head height. The floor will be raised at this point level with the house up until 5 feet out then the steps will start down to the ground (2 steps).. The porch area will be raised 10 inches to make it level with the kitchen floor.. This stove will become part of my house and if I am going to spend this much money on tile work or bricks I might as well make it beautiful to where it becomes part of this old house..I believe the stove piping will be about in the middle of the roof area with bricks behind and the stove straight on facing the kitchen.. That will give this heat from the stove full access to the rest of the house as well as protecting my piping if everything goes to complete blackout..One of the other posters on this forum mentioned "water pipes" and I never though of this but its true--why have a porch 90 degrees when my pipes in the house might freeze up---never thought about that...lol lol I am old but new at this,,,lol Thanks..Let me know what you think and if this might work? Always new developments here and we are working our way through this quest...I will call my electrician on Monday to set up a appointment to play with the wires and lighting on that wall...or disconnect--whatever he does--he"s a expert..Thanks..Clancey
 

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,319
South Puget Sound, WA
Make sure that the stove's ceiling clearance requirement is honored. Typically this is 84".
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
Thanks something else to think about and if I have to I will pop up the roof - lol lol . I might have to lower it to floor level --I do not know and just sent my installer a e-mail to order my beautiful J.A. Roby Stove...I am sure he will make another visit to walk this over again spouting out regulations and etc etc etc...But we will get it done....Thanks Everyone ...clancey..
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,319
South Puget Sound, WA
I like your spirit. Sounds like you are having a lot of fun. It will be Christmas in July for you.
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
You darn right--.. The first week of April the little wood shed will be built and the carpenter will have a look at the wall. Tomorrow I will give the electrician a call for him to have a visit so this goes on and on--but for me it is fun and invigorating and keeps me feeling young... Off I go to do more measuring...thanks...Clancey.
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
I have been trying to check out ceiling heights--hard especially when you don;t know what your doing but anyway I have come with minimum ceiling heights for Roby stoves is 84 inches --from floor to ceiling.. My door way from the ground is 10 inches and the door is 80 inches high but the ceiling slopes down and I lose height so I might have to lower the floor and not have it even with the floor of my house floor but I am working on this to see what I can do and I might very well be wrong on all this because I do not know how to read what spec"s they are talking about and the cooking stoves are much higher with double shelves and stuff.. Lets put it this way its going to go somewhere even in my bird loft,,,lol Working on this and it continues and continues...thanks for reading...Clancey


I FOUND THE SOLUTION:


https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https://www.granddesignsmagazine.com/home-improvements/506-efficiency-tips-for-woodburning-stoves&psig=AOvVaw0pcm3d0ONQJia1TzPqh27n&ust=1616461789424000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJjOwNLbwu8CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAO
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,319
South Puget Sound, WA
If that is the only issue you may be able to put a ceiling heat shield on 1" spacers over the stove.
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
Well I guess I will come down from cloud nine now and get back to reality. The porch area will be concreted and I will place this stove right on top of the concrete and have some kind of fire proof backing and place it right between the two house windows in front of that wall. I need to remember that this stove is only for "emergencies" and not to heat the whole house. I will have the porch insulated and go down steps into it from the house and have the whole flat area without breaking it up into sections. If the concrete area gets dirty with dragging wood in so be it because I will have a level floor to just sweep. When I practice burning a little wood just to become a little bit more expert with this wood heater I will open up the windows and door to see if I can pull in some of the hot air towards the house by fans. Now they do have some fans that are battery operated and one of them works by four batteries and if you put it on low it will give you 205 hours of use until you have to change the batteries again.. This I am going to check into for we much remember this is when all electric is off in a emergency and I will have some extra batteries on hand.. As far as the water piping in my house is concerned I need to ask a plumber what I would do like shut the water off and drain the water out of the pipes or even put antifreeze in in the pipes like they do for car batteries. I do not know at the moment but will do some research on this problem to avoid having the pipes freezing in the dead of winter. I have hot water heat and a hot water heater. So I will let my plumber guide me on how to do all of this--if need be--for knowledge about these things is good and I should know this...Just keeping you all informed and now I can think about my little wood shed...clancey
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,319
South Puget Sound, WA
If you have a concrete pad poured, put 2" of insulation under it and around the perimeter before the pour. Cold concrete floors suck the heat right out of the room (and your feet).
 
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DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
860
Texas
If you have a concrete pad poured, put 2" of insulation under it and around the perimeter before the pour. Cold concrete floors suck the heat right out of the room (and your feet).
I just want to repeat this idea. A concrete slab sucks the heat right out of a house. That’s why we feel cold in winters down in South Central Texas. I try to remind myself that it provides that same heat-sucking ability in summer, and our summers are long and hot, but on a gray day in the 60’s (today) we feel cold because of the uninsulated slab (and the ceramic tile on top of it). It’s just a bit too warm to fire up the woodstove. I’ll be baking later in the day, so that will help.

I’ve been following your threads, Mrs. Clancey, and you’re getting good advice. I keep thinking, though, when I read about all the money you’re planning to spend on enclosing the porch to put an emergency woodstove that it might not be the best choice. If you need or want the porch enclosed for other reasons, it could work. I apologize if I missed those details. If you’re only doing it for the woodstove, I’d reconsider and work hard to find a spot in your house for something with close clearances and the cooking surface you want. It would be a less complicated investment and be more practical.

I bet if you sketched out a floor plan of your house and posted a picture of it on here, folks would find a good spot for the perfect stove for you. I’ve seen them guide many people to great solutions that make them very happy. I’m worried that your emergency stove on a porch isn’t going to give you the results you want for all the money it will require.
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
Your a very wise person and I sure appreciate your very good suggestion...I paid for the stove today from Obadeah"s for I know that I want that stove. I got the blower kit as well and the cooking plate that goes over the top of the stove. I paid for the parts in regard to the installation. I cancelled the brick work behind the stove for now until I decide on where I want to place the stove.. So far the total parts are about 1500.00 and the stove in total with the options total 2407.00. Right now I have spend a total of 3,907.00. Next in line until I get the little wood shed built I will get concrete blocks and two by fours and place the wood on top of this "make do" arrangement and cover it with a tarp to keep it dry for now.. The concrete floor was going to be laid anyway as well as enclosing it in with insulation. I really need the extra room because my house is only 500 or 600 square feet to begin with--its small but well organized and I have fitted it to my very own taste so I am very comfortable in it and have been blessed as well.. So what I am going to do is have my carpenter enclose the porch after the concrete people arrive because he needs to be there with the concrete people to put screws or something in the concrete so that he can secure the walls of the porch or something like that---this job was planned long before the stove and I was just waiting until I got enough of money to do it and now is the time...The stove should arrive here (shipped free) from Montana in 2 or 3 weeks and I will check it out with a fine tooth comb before the delivery people leave and no paper signing unless it is just as beautiful as I know it will be then we will cart it into my enclosed back porch by way of the men and then I will sit down and have a cup of coffee and just look at it in my enclosed and insulated porch with the spot left open where the stove will be installed when I get ready to do that order of business. That might be in August sometime so we have plenty of time to decide where it should be and in the meanwhile this is all I am doing. This stove is just to have on hand in case some unforeseen thing happens to where the power "completely" goes out...But in the meanwhile we are all fine and that's all that will be done for now...The porch I planned anyway and the stove just adds a additional important thing to think about.. That idea of yours about putting insulation under that concrete is brilliant and I will check that out and do you happen to know what kind of insulation is the best for that? Four inches of concrete will be laid on April 12 and this is already paid for so they just come in and pour it from the back alley because I will not let that concrete truck on my driveway. The concrete people are very good and they knew not to even think about that and they suggested bringing it in from the alley in back. When my carpenter gets here from Florida he and I will figure all of this out for he is house builder for many years and he will get the job done..So I am in pretty good shape and thank you so much for caring--I appreciate and now what kind of insulation do I get to go under that concrete for there is river rock there now and I need to know this to get prepared for my carpenter and the concrete people. thanks so much..I am writing a book-lol Clancey
 

brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
6,190
NE Ohio
Just FYI. if you can find (or make) a box in the approximate size of the stove, that works well to try placing it in different spots, see where exactly works the best...some people do better if they can actually see something physical rather that just trying to visualize it...
 
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DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
860
Texas
Your a very wise person and I sure appreciate your very good suggestion...I paid for the stove today from Obadeah"s for I know that I want that stove. I got the blower kit as well and the cooking plate that goes over the top of the stove. I paid for the parts in regard to the installation. I cancelled the brick work behind the stove for now until I decide on where I want to place the stove.. So far the total parts are about 1500.00 and the stove in total with the options total 2407.00. Right now I have spend a total of 3,907.00. Next in line until I get the little wood shed built I will get concrete blocks and two by fours and place the wood on top of this "make do" arrangement and cover it with a tarp to keep it dry for now.. The concrete floor was going to be laid anyway as well as enclosing it in with insulation. I really need the extra room because my house is only 500 or 600 square feet to begin with--its small but well organized and I have fitted it to my very own taste so I am very comfortable in it and have been blessed as well.. So what I am going to do is have my carpenter enclose the porch after the concrete people arrive because he needs to be there with the concrete people to put screws or something in the concrete so that he can secure the walls of the porch or something like that---this job was planned long before the stove and I was just waiting until I got enough of money to do it and now is the time...The stove should arrive here (shipped free) from Montana in 2 or 3 weeks and I will check it out with a fine tooth comb before the delivery people leave and no paper signing unless it is just as beautiful as I know it will be then we will cart it into my enclosed back porch by way of the men and then I will sit down and have a cup of coffee and just look at it in my enclosed and insulated porch with the spot left open where the stove will be installed when I get ready to do that order of business. That might be in August sometime so we have plenty of time to decide where it should be and in the meanwhile this is all I am doing. This stove is just to have on hand in case some unforeseen thing happens to where the power "completely" goes out...But in the meanwhile we are all fine and that's all that will be done for now...The porch I planned anyway and the stove just adds a additional important thing to think about.. That idea of yours about putting insulation under that concrete is brilliant and I will check that out and do you happen to know what kind of insulation is the best for that? Four inches of concrete will be laid on April 12 and this is already paid for so they just come in and pour it from the back alley because I will not let that concrete truck on my driveway. The concrete people are very good and they knew not to even think about that and they suggested bringing it in from the alley in back. When my carpenter gets here from Florida he and I will figure all of this out for he is house builder for many years and he will get the job done..So I am in pretty good shape and thank you so much for caring--I appreciate and now what kind of insulation do I get to go under that concrete for there is river rock there now and I need to know this to get prepared for my carpenter and the concrete people. thanks so much..I am writing a book-lol Clancey
I appreciate the book, and I’m glad that the porch was something that you were doing anyway. Folks like @begreen, @peakbagger, @SeasonedOak are much better able to give you advice about the proper insulation. I could just chime in about what an uninsulated slab feels like in winter.

My mom has an enclosed sun porch on the back of her house. For years she used a woodstove to keep it warm for her lemon, lime, and pineapples if the weather dropped too cold at night. It worked well.

I’m glad you were able to order the stove you wanted. The blower kit will definitely help if you want to move air in from the porch to the main house. Keep posting here with all your details and ideas and questions. Folks are very experienced, knowledgeable, and helpful.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,319
South Puget Sound, WA
Typically 2" EPS (expanded polystyrene) is used under the slab. Let them know well in advance so that they have the materials on hand.
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
Now brenndatomu last time I did that was with the Morso1410 and right immediately afterwards decided that was not the stove for me and cancelled the stove---lol lol ..That by the way was a wonderful stove and could heat a lot of space and it was very easy to handle.. But I really just like this Roby because of the evenness in size and especially the height and the two cooking areas on the top of the stove without being massive in appearance like some others and those straight lines that it has would fit in any decor so I am excited and can't wait to get it here.. It's EPA approved and it has capacity to heat a large area and if not my little house down the road there is a much larger one to heat when I am take my long rest. On here when people mention stoves I can actually envision some of them how they look and I have my stove preferences---lol lol---and a few weeks ago did not know nothing about them.. I am enjoying your little forum as well and met some very interesting people so its been fun.. You kind of get a glimpse into peoples different lifestyles and this to me is fun just to know them for that minute in time.. Take the three of you--brenndatomu is sensible and duaeGuttae is a gardener with history behind and begreen is a old fool---kidding here --I really like begreen and he is a expert in his field and I respect this.. I could go on and on about all the different members who posted and made my life not so lonely.. So I am going to sit back and just enjoy what our Lord has given us all. Now tomorrow I will share my enjoyment with the concrete company and ask them to get this 2 inch EPS expanded polystyrene stuff to insulate under the concrete that they are going to lay down so that it will be warmer on the concrete floor by the heater so that the heat does not get suck up and wasted and makes one feel cold. That problem is solved...can't wait to share this with "Robert" the concrete man.. Thanks everyone ...clancey....
 
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MR. GLO

Member
Jan 26, 2021
128
Massachusetts
Could not get in some positions because of snow and it was slippery and the white cardboard is the size of the stove: High 27.5 Depth: 14.5 and width 15.5.. It is top corners closest to house is situated at 20 inches straight to wall on each side....One direction from a advertisement was : Stove to side wall 20 inches and Stove to rear wall 6 inches and stove to corner 14 inches.. My second choice would be in the middle of the two windows straight on would give more room and maybe since I am raising the stove about 10 inches so I do not have to bend down so low to load it maybe if wide enough people could sit around it. So I could have it catty corner or straight between the two windows...What do you all think..? thanks..clancey.. Also do bricks retain heat better than tile for a stove and would just bricks be better.. The tile picture is post number one...But if bricks retain heat would that be better and maybe more protection and would look more like a hearth as well--what do you think..." enticement here----I love you all " Thank you..clancey;

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how tall is your chimney going above the roof? those neighbors will love ya and your second floor window will need to be closed. it will work but pay attention to soot on inside walls and co meter on all floors.
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
I think it will be about 12 ft or more and 6 foot inside and 6 foot outside but I am not sure at this moment..I tried to zone the installer in with this question but I never seemed to get quick answers but he seems to know his stuff so we all will find out..I switched stoves to a Roby stove that is much larger and I am more comfortable with it although it is larger then the squirrel. So we will take it as it comes and it is a learning experience for me as well. This stove will not be burned that much for it is only going to be set up for a emergency just to have it there..Some people have fireplaces for that purpose but I have my beautiful Roby stove that should be coming in two or three weeks for it is already paid for so I am looking forward to that and having fun designing the space somewhat until my carpenter arrives in the first and second week of April. I need to buy such things as wood testers for wetness and assorted temperature gauges and CO alarm systems and a fire extinguisher and maybe a little saw and I have an ax so if any of you people have any special brand names or equipment or gauges that you think that I should have please at your leisure let me know what kind so that I can check these out. This Roby weighs 166 pounds and is there anyway that I could burn it in the yard to burn off all those chemicals that smell with first burn--just asking here--so many questions but it is fun to become aware of all of this information. This next new weeks will be wood researching on where to buy and how dry could I get a small batch to burn--seasoned so that I can just have a test burn in the proper time...As far as the neighbor is concerned maybe I will move it closer to his house but he is rarely at home anyway and he I am sure could care less about "anything" including keeping his property very very unkempt or even cared about so difficulties goes both ways.. May he do the best that he can and just leave me alone. Amen..Thanks clancey..
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
My installer and I walked through my project of putting in a wood burning stove to get ready to place it at the right location for clearances and legal installment. We place the "card board copy" at the right locations --10 inches from the rear wall and 20 inches from the side wall and 8 inches to the corner. This wall will be dry walled and he said as long as we abide by the clearances that brick or rock facing is unnecessary. To my thinking this would make it safer if there was a heat shield attached that was one inch from the dry wall to give it air flow behind it. My question is "Do I have to have anything else on the wall if we abide by the clearances and would a heat shield in your estimation be of any benefit?.. The piping will be 12 foot and it is straight until it gets to the 2.4 and then there is a elbow that connects to some kind of box inside the ceiling and continues through the roof to the rest of the height and I questioned him about that elbow and asked if I could have just a straight pipe and he looked at the spaces between the 2x4's on the roofing and said that would then not clear other things in the porch and the elbow was needed..My question is will this elbow interfere with the cleaning or air flow to this wood stove..? Just wondering...I ordered a 48 inch french doors that I will place on my porch back wall so that I can open it to let heat into the house if need be and we marked clearances from that as well. I also have a 36 inch door that goes out to the driveway and we marked clearances from that as well for it will swing against the wall side.. I also will have a window in the middle of the porch outer side that is 24 inch in height and 30 inch in width that I ordered years ago as a special order and now it is coming in handy.. So this project is going forward and just wanted to ask you people about all of these questions that I have in regard to this installation...I am slowly going out of my mind---lol lol--but this project is moving forward nicely and tomorrow the 48 inch french doors will arrive...So I am getting excited...Surely appreciate your time with me on this project and the floor will be concrete all the way in the room and will have what you suggested laid down first 2 inch EPS expanded polystyrene put under the 4 inch concrete..The stove will be raised 3 inches to make it 36 inch high and this will be a concrete pad secured under the stove to raise its height----continuing and once again--thanks for your help and encouragement always appreciate...clancey
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,319
South Puget Sound, WA
If clearances are honored then there is no need for additional wall protection unless one wants greater peace of mind. In that case, a veneer of regular brick would suffice with no air gap. Or the wall behind the stove could get cement board with tile on it. The clearance measurement would still be to the nearest combustible in either case, the studs in the wall.
12 ft is a short flue system. It is the minimum requirement. There is no need for an offset. It may slow down draft. The ceiling/roof joists can be strengthened and boxed to frame the chimney support box if there is a joist in the way. This is not uncommon and it is mentioned in the manual. Connect the stove using double-wall stovepipe to optimize draft.
 

clancey

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2021
490
Colorado
Thanks but when you say that there is no need for a offset "what does that mean" ? Is that the elbow that I am talking about that he is going to place in the ceiling for my carpenter can strengthen that area if need be for I think I want it straight up but he said he could not do it unless he changed the space where it is to be and that would change all the clearances from the combustibles and would make it difficult for it would take up too much room in the porch area. I guess (is this possible) to have a 14 foot pipe and would that make the draft better? He also is going to have bracing and some kind of a wind shield or something on it as well.. So is a pipe straight better than one with a elbow going to the box like that on the inside of the roof in your opinion for I can have my carpenter fix that if that's what I think you are saying--its hard for me to figure these things out...lol Thanks for the help...clancey