Fixing/Replacing Slammed Buck Stove Insert

Status
Not open for further replies.

H2O

New Member
Nov 18, 2015
7
Kansas City, MO
Good morning,

I have an old Buck Stove insert that came with my house that I bought this past Spring. It was installed in the fireplace via "slamming". I have been researching this issue on these boards and determined that the solution is (please correct me if I'm wrong) to directly connect my stove to the chimney and if one is not present (unsure at the moment) install a pipe all the way up the chimney. I'm not sure if this is something I could do myself or if it is cost prohibitive to have done. I have also considered replacing the insert with a newer, more efficient one, although I am certain that would be the more expensive option.

My house is only about 900 to 1000 sq ft and I would like to ultimately heat 80% to 100% with wood. I would welcome any suggestions/advice on how to proceed.
 

mellow

Resident Stove Connoisseur
Jan 19, 2008
5,072
Salisbury, MD
You can do this DIY if you read and familiarize yourself with what you need from previous threads on here.

I doubt you have a liner if it was a slammer, most likely just terracotta tiles going to the top. You would need to measure those tiles to see what size insulated liner you can fit down them and measure how tall your chimney is. I would get rid of the buck and start all new, reasons for this can be found in previous posts.

1000 sq feet can be easily heated with a newer insert. If you want you can post some pictures of your setup and the size of your fireplace and get some ideas of what will fit.

What is your budget to spend on this project?
 

H2O

New Member
Nov 18, 2015
7
Kansas City, MO
Here are a few pictures detailing the current set up:

image.jpg

image.jpg

image.jpg
image.jpg
image.jpg

EDIT: I have not thought about a budget at this time but would certainly appreciate some numbers to consider.
 
Last edited:

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,598
South Puget Sound, WA
What is the tile size? 12x12 tile flue?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,598
South Puget Sound, WA
There should be no issue getting an insulated 6" liner down there. Nice fireplace!
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,893
central pa
There should be no issue getting an insulated 6" liner down there. Nice fireplace!
Yeah but that buck need a 7" minimum. We usually run 8" on them but 7 would probably work ok depending on the height. But even an insulated 8" will fit fine.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,041
07462
That's an awesome looking fire place, a liner and block off plate (w/ insulation) is the way to go if that stove is in good shape (no cracks, warps, good blower), its more than plenty for what you need.
The hang up is that if you put a 7" liner then want a new stove you may have a hard time finding something that is compatible with a 7" liner that can maintain a good draft especially since your local climate is a tad warmer most of the time compared to other places.
 

H2O

New Member
Nov 18, 2015
7
Kansas City, MO
That's an awesome looking fire place, a liner and block off plate (w/ insulation) is the way to go if that stove is in good shape (no cracks, warps, good blower), its more than plenty for what you need.
The hang up is that if you put a 7" liner then want a new stove you may have a hard time finding something that is compatible with a 7" liner that can maintain a good draft especially since your local climate is a tad warmer most of the time compared to other places.
To my knowledge the stove is in good shape. It has a single speed blower that works great.

What exactly are the materials I would need to install a liner? Also what do you mean about maintaining a good draft in a warmer climate (apologies, I'm new to this)?

I realize it may be difficult to come by specific numbers, but generally speaking, I am trying to determine the cost of keeping the old Buck Stove and installing the liner be vs buying a new stove and having that installed. I am on the fence about which way to go from a cost perspective.

Thank you all for your help.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,598
South Puget Sound, WA
Yeah but that buck need a 7" minimum. We usually run 8" on them but 7 would probably work ok depending on the height. But even an insulated 8" will fit fine.
I was thinking for a replacement EPA stove, not the old Buck. That is personally what I would invest in. A decent insert can be had for around $1000. The liner costs will be less for 6" than for 7 or 8". Sell the Buck for around $300.

How tall is the chimney?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,893
central pa
I was thinking for a replacement EPA stove, not the old Buck. That is personally what I would invest in. A decent insert can be had for around $1000. The liner costs will be less for 6" than for 7 or 8". Sell the Buck for around $300.
I agree totally
 

mellow

Resident Stove Connoisseur
Jan 19, 2008
5,072
Salisbury, MD
For kicks and giggles (way too many variables here) here are some basic numbers
If you had a pro come out and install a new budget friendly insert you would be in the range of $3000-$5000
If you bought a budget insert and insulated 6" liner and did a DIY install you would be around $2000-$2500.
If you buy a rectangle to round boot for that Buck and DIY installed an insulated 8" liner you would be around $800-1200.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CrufflerJJ

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,598
South Puget Sound, WA
Follow that number by the cost of greater wood consumption + cleanings if buying wood and using the old Buck.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Woody Stover

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,893
central pa
The number for the 8" liner sounds pretty low also for that stove you really should use heavy wall it will burn through lightwall pretty quick. And heavy wall costs quite a bit more
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,893
central pa
And honestly looking at those pics, attaching a boot to that insert is going to be a PIA, not much height there to work with fitting your hands in there to attach the liner to the boot once the buck is slid in the fireplace.
You attach the liner to the boot then slide the stove in and bolt the boot down. Still a pita but much easier than the other way
 

TheRambler

Feeling the Heat
Jul 29, 2014
478
CT
Didn't see it mentioned previously, so I will answer some of your questions. Its really a pretty easy DIY, no matter which route you go. All it takes is some basic hand tools and a drill. Installing the liner isn't too difficult, especially with the size you are working with it show go in fairly easy. The only time you have any issues is if its not a straight run from the bottom to the top, i.e it has a 45 deg turn etc.

Installing a new liner is really as simple as slowing lowering it down the chimney from the top, will someone pulling with a pull rope from the bottom. a few people to assist and it will be really easy. Can be done with two people. Once you get it in place then you just attach the top plate and flue rain cap. I would say the biggest thing preventing most people from doing it would be a roof that is difficult to work on, but putting up some scaffolding or using other means of fall protection remedies that issue. You can buy the liner kits that come with everything you need.

Putting in a new insert is easy enough also. It looks like you already pulled the old one out for a cleaning. After that you just put it on a piano dolly and take it out of the house. then roll the new one in and have a couple people help lift it into place if need be.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,893
central pa
Didn't see it mentioned previously, so I will answer some of your questions. Its really a pretty easy DIY, no matter which route you go. All it takes is some basic hand tools and a drill. Installing the liner isn't too difficult, especially with the size you are working with it show go in fairly easy. The only time you have any issues is if its not a straight run from the bottom to the top, i.e it has a 45 deg turn etc.

Installing a new liner is really as simple as slowing lowering it down the chimney from the top, will someone pulling with a pull rope from the bottom. a few people to assist and it will be really easy. Can be done with two people. Once you get it in place then you just attach the top plate and flue rain cap. I would say the biggest thing preventing most people from doing it would be a roof that is difficult to work on, but putting up some scaffolding or using other means of fall protection remedies that issue. You can buy the liner kits that come with everything you need.

Putting in a new insert is easy enough also. It looks like you already pulled the old one out for a cleaning. After that you just put it on a piano dolly and take it out of the house. then roll the new one in and have a couple people help lift it into place if need be.
Believe me they are not all that simple. Even ones that seem like they are going to be straight forward can turn bad in a hurry. And vise versa
 

gzecc

Minister of Fire
Sep 24, 2008
4,691
NNJ

gzecc

Minister of Fire
Sep 24, 2008
4,691
NNJ
This should be moved to the Classic Forum.
 

electrathon

Minister of Fire
Sep 17, 2015
549
Gresham, OR
While not being the first choice (which I agree is a nice new stove) this stove has worked for 20 plus years with the clay chimney liner. It seems to me that the simplest way to fix the "slammer" issue would be to build a block off plate with a hole in it. Slide in a boot like what is pictured above. Slide the stove in and slip the boot down onto the stove. Reinstall the slammer cover plate. This is a $50 answer to make the functioning stove safe.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,598
South Puget Sound, WA
That is not a proper direct connect which requires the liner reach to above the first tile liner. It's not my favorite solution at all but it would be less expensive.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,893
central pa
While not being the first choice (which I agree is a nice new stove) this stove has worked for 20 plus years with the clay chimney liner. It seems to me that the simplest way to fix the "slammer" issue would be to build a block off plate with a hole in it. Slide in a boot like what is pictured above. Slide the stove in and slip the boot down onto the stove. Reinstall the slammer cover plate. This is a $50 answer to make the functioning stove safe.
Not a good functioning or safe stove at all no. That is only a slight step up from a slammer in performance or safety.
 

electrathon

Minister of Fire
Sep 17, 2015
549
Gresham, OR
Not a good functioning or safe stove at all no. That is only a slight step up from a slammer in performance or safety.
Perhaps an explanation to this statement would help. As to function, the stove functioned adequately when built, or do you mean that the stove was never acceptable as a functioning stove? Not a safe stove? Do you mean that with a direct connect chimney that it is not safe or that the stove is not safe as designed? Many of the old slammer stoves were the same stove as a non-slammer but just had a stove block off plate instead of a flange to connect it to a chimney. If you mean that in older stove is not as good as a new stove that makes total sense, just like all 20 year old cars are unsafe because they do not have the same safety standards as brand new cars.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,160
Southern IN
Not a good functioning or safe stove at all no. That is only a slight step up from a slammer in performance or safety.
Perhaps an explanation to this statement would help.
It's clear to me he's talking about the install not being very safe or functional, even though he wrote "stove" in his reply. It's going to be sluggish on the big clay liner unless it's pretty cold out, prone to back-puffing, and a creosote factory if burned on a regular basis like he wants to do, unless you burn it hot all the time. But the temptation is to smolder it to try to get an overnight burn, or to save wood. If you have some creo build-up, then burn hot, a chimney fire is a possibility. In this case I would not attempt a direct-connect. The only way I might try it would be on a smaller clay liner, but probably not even then. I'm inclined to just go ahead and do it right the first time. Positive connection to the top and a clean-burning stove that's going to recoup the extra I money I spend up front in a few years, in reduced wood usage, plus an easier-to-clean chimney. Why mess around now, only to come back in a few years, tear it out and re-do it?
 
  • Like
Reactions: bholler
Status
Not open for further replies.