Starting the hearth

KJamesJR Posted By KJamesJR, Sep 3, 2018 at 10:01 PM

  1. KJamesJR

    KJamesJR
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 8, 2018
    45
    11
    Loc:
    New Hampshire
    What better time to start a hearth build then Laborday, just three months before winter!

    I’m using this thread as a log and questionnaire, mainly for myself. This is primarily a hearth build but secondary, a start of our kitchen renovation. I will not be featuring any kitchen remodeling here although some things may intersect... like leveling and bracing floors, knocking down walls, and plumbing. This is a very ambitious build. The chimney will be added later on in the coming weeks and may or may not feature a build. My ETA to get the hearth completed is two weeks. Time spent mostly after work and weekend warrior’ing.

    We decided on this location because it’s in the center of the house. There is, or was a sink and dish washer here but we’re moving that to a kitchen island with bench area. So some things like water and drain pipes will be getting moved.

    This is an old New England house. We purchased not too long ago so I expect to find a lot of surprises and halfassery along the way. I’m not a carpenter but I’ve done my homework which I hope is just enough for a job well done.

    The stove going in I’s a Jutol F500, which I have featured here before.
     
  2. KJamesJR

    KJamesJR
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 8, 2018
    45
    11
    Loc:
    New Hampshire
    So I went to Lowe’s and picked up most everything I need. Surprised it wasn’t packed given the fact it’s Laborday. Walked out with a new miter saw I wasn’t expecting to purchase but the price was right and figured I needed one anyway. No better time then the present.

    Got home and immediately started ripping the cabinets out. I know it’s an old house, but the amount of mouse poop unearthed was staggering. Wife almost vomited on the spot.

    I was also bamboozled. This brick wall I expected to go to the floor. Instead it stops on a small stud wall, who’s primary objective is supporting the weight of said bricks and hiding some outlets that haven’t been seen in x amount of years.
     

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  3. KJamesJR

    KJamesJR
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 8, 2018
    45
    11
    Loc:
    New Hampshire
    Got most of the mouse poop cleaned up. I’m hoping these were mice already killed by my cats and these are simply the remanence.

    Then I spent the better part of my day tearing up THREE layers of hardwood floor. Between each layer, a layer of that cheap sticky tile.

    I started cutting into it with a skill saw, at full depth, but when I started pulling up tile which seemed to date back to the 70’s I stopped cutting by fear of asbestos. These tile were about two layers of wood floor down. I switched to a more noninvasive technique of prying/scrapping the decades old tile with a scraper and prybar. Took me a lot longer than I was expecting. I fianally finished and ended my night when I reached the original floor layer. 1” oak with just pine board underlayment. Amazing still in good condition all things considered.

    I got the overall layout roughed in which pretty much ends my night.

    I’m debating on taking the floor all the way down to the joists and using new 3/4” underlay after I add supports and leveling. I know it’s the right way to do it but the existing floor is in decent condition. I will still have to work on the joists topside as there’s just no room from underneath. Decisions...
     

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  4. xman23

    xman23
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Oct 7, 2008
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    Loc:
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    Keep us posted, you never know we might be able to help with the decisions. Even with issues those floors can be made to look real nice. Assuming it's oak. Whats the vintage of the house?
     
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  5. Ashful

    Ashful
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 7, 2012
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    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    The top layer is yellow pine, but given the back-side milling and the presence of pith in the plank, not as old as it’s surface might have you thinking. Can’t tell what the layers below are, from the photo posted. Is that middle layer plywood?
     
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