What PPE do you all use when running the saw?

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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,932
Downeast Maine
Just watch some vids of lumber being cut in asian or south american countries.
Bare foot ripping logs with a Stihl090 that they carry on their mopeds along with their cutting partner and his 090 too.No helmets,or other riding gear either.
They might wad up some old cloth and stick it in their ears,but the PPE ends there.
It's a wonder they survive a week :rolleyes:
That's what keeps our good cheap!
 

shortys7777

Feeling the Heat
Nov 15, 2017
340
Smithfield, RI
I wear ear muffs, eye protection and gloves. I should get a pair of chaps. I also wear regular work boots. I like to be in my boots all day on weekends and what not so I wear 9 inch regular chippewa boots. Helmet does not seem like a bad idea. However I hardly drop many trees. I always check my surroundings and find an escape route, etc. Couple years ago I had a company drop 2 massive oak trees (needed to be climbed) because they were so close to the house. Guy on the ground was walking around with sneakers on in the rain with a massive saw cutting in into sections and taking off the big limbs for the chipper. At least they were insured. If I recall all he had on was ear protection.
 

Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
1,169
Palmyra, WI
In the 80s, I was laughed at for wearing hand and ear protection while on the job (not wood related). I watched others loose their hearing or become disabled (watched it happen, permanent, in real time), so didn't care about the feedback. Yesterday I picked up some materials where I work for a project at home. It is required to wear hand and ear protection if working on the shop floor (sheet metal shop). Imagine that. You hear the same stories about chainsaws. It's sissy - then get a nick to the leg, - and then it's all about to hl with that, drop the bucks and get it, funny how attitudes change quickly, or employers or land owners threaten to kick you out for not suiting up so it's forced, then you can't imaging going back to the way it was.
As far as a culture that fails to see the value - it's funny how normalized just about any behavior can become, no matter how insidious or self destructive. There are better ways, and they aren't that hard to implement, they just cost some money or time or thought is all.
I have chaps, a helmet with muffs and face shield, and kevlar gloves. Steel toe boots are also an issue as far a fit (fat feet), so I've opted to avoid those. The chaps have seen some use (2 small nicks) and did their job as intended. The kevlar strands they contain are amazingly effective in binding a chain.
 
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MTASH

Burning Hunk
Dec 24, 2018
165
Montana
I think it's also what behaviors you have internalized as 'normal'. I grew up around saws and have still never seen somebody (in person, videos excluded) wearing chaps or safety glasses to operate one, so that is probably also a factor.
I was like this. Grew up cutting wood and nobody wore anything other than gloves, although as a woodworker my dad wore safety glasses.

A few years ago I convinced myself to buy some chaps. The third trip out after doing so, I lost my balance while limbing and nicked my thigh. Scared the chit out of me, but thankfully the chaps did their job.

My boots are all steel-toed, so that's a given.

I wear hearing aids, so I now wear earplugs to try and save what natural hearing I have left. Wish I would've made that choice decades ago.
 
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PaulOinMA

Minister of Fire
Oct 20, 2018
957
MA
I never bought a chainsaw protective jacket. I thought the ones I saw were pretty expensive. And, as mentioned above, torso injuries are less common than leg injuries.

Then, I chanced upon the Swedepro chainsaw protective shirt a little while ago. As I mentioned above, I thought for $70 why not get it.

It hit me a little while ago because of this thread. Is that a comment on how much I value risking serious injury or my life. I'll spend $70 on the protective shirt, but won't spend $200+ on a protective jacket? :)
 
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salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,433
Northern Canada
I never bought a chainsaw protective jacket. I thought the ones I saw were pretty expensive. And, as mentioned above, torso injuries are less common than leg injuries.

Then, I chanced upon the Swedepro chainsaw protective shirt a little while ago. As I mentioned above, I thought for $70 why not get it.

It hit me a little while ago because of this thread. Is that a comment on how much I value risking serious injury or my life. I'll spend $70 on the protective shirt, but won't spend $200+ on a protective jacket? :)
It's called playing the odds...
 

TreePointer

Minister of Fire
Sep 22, 2010
3,122
PA
EVERY TIME:
Chaps
Steel toe boots
Antivibe gloves
Safety glasses
Ear muffs

If around trees/branches that can fall from above, I'll add a helmet with a metal mesh shield.
 
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Chain saw boots. Orange rubber ones. Typical steel toe boots offer very little saw protection in comparison.
As to sneakers or none steel toed boot ?
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,932
Downeast Maine
Chain saw boots. Orange rubber ones. Typical steel toe boots offer very little saw protection in comparison.
Maybe a typical work boot, but I would assume my "super loggers" would be suitable. However, next time I will probably get rubber boots with steel toes, like the same as my Xtratuff boots, but with steel toes.
 

Diabel

Minister of Fire
Jan 11, 2008
3,165
Ottawa, ON
Couple of years ago I picked up a pair of Husky steeltoe rubber boots. Dont use them much, very heavy and stiff. I never thought they might provide more protection over the steel toe leather boots.
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
10,778
Nova Scotia
Couple of years ago I picked up a pair of Husky steeltoe rubber boots. Dont use them much, very heavy and stiff. I never thought they might provide more protection over the steel toe leather boots.
Rubber saw boots have saw protection all up the front of the boot. 'Typical'steel toe boots which sounds like a lot of people here are talking about have very little.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,428
central pa
I have a pair of the rubber saw boots and honestly I just can't work in them. They are so awkward and uncomfortable I feel they make me loose focus. But I always wear chaps steel toe boots and helmet with face shield and ear muffs
 

Diabel

Minister of Fire
Jan 11, 2008
3,165
Ottawa, ON
I always bring the helmet with me. But the minute I start cutting/bucking it falls off. My take is that if I have the shield down, it will prevent debris from getting in the eyes. And if a kickback happens it will protect my face. I just cant keep it on my head.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,428
central pa
I always bring the helmet with me. But the minute I start cutting/bucking it falls off. My take is that if I have the shield down, it will prevent debris from getting in the eyes. And if a kickback happens it will protect my face. I just cant keep it on my head.
The earmuffs on mine hold it in place pretty well
 
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Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
1,169
Palmyra, WI
Personally, the helmet and earmuffs have made possible cutting in all weather (cold weather). Severe cold, wind, snow, I am very much snug as a bug and comfy. It's an all in one outfit. Pricker bushes, brush, branches that will whip, chips - I can march through junk to get at limbs without getting slapped or coming home with rip marks on my face from prickly ash. Not that I'm complacent,but before, no matter how careful all day long, the last cut will snap a branch and leave a nice slap to the face, and usually it's one full of thorns.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
780
SE North Carolina
Rubber saw boots have saw protection all up the front of the boot. 'Typical'steel toe boots which sounds like a lot of people here are talking about have very little.
Just bought a pair for110$, 160$ less than my ER copay.
 
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salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,433
Northern Canada
I always bring the helmet with me. But the minute I start cutting/bucking it falls off. My take is that if I have the shield down, it will prevent debris from getting in the eyes. And if a kickback happens it will protect my face. I just cant keep it on my head.
Staples...
 
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semipro

Minister of Fire
Jan 12, 2009
4,022
SW Virginia
I'm a big believer in PPE.
I don't recall either of these occurring. I only noticed later. The face screen cut was clean like from a chain.
I need to be more careful.
1620996845088.png 1620996895430.png
 
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semipro

Minister of Fire
Jan 12, 2009
4,022
SW Virginia
Not that I'm complacent,but before, no matter how careful all day long, the last cut will snap a branch and leave a nice slap to the face, and usually it's one full of thorns.
After having felled 20+ cedars with some Hawthorne and Locust lately I've been spending some time loading branches into an auto-feed chipper. I won't do it anymore without the helmet and face screen. It's saved me numerous times as the auto feeder grabs something and flails it around. I can take the body blows but the head/face shots are nasty, especially when thorns are involved.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,932
Downeast Maine
After having felled 20+ cedars with some Hawthorne and Locust lately I've been spending some time loading branches into an auto-feed chipper. I won't do it anymore without the helmet and face screen. It's saved me numerous times as the auto feeder grabs something and flails it around. I can take the body blows but the head/face shots are nasty, especially when thorns are involved.
My PTO shredder will take in an entire 10'+ sapling up to 3" and it does so very violently, like all at once. Chipper shredders definitely deserve respect.
 
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jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
5,266
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
Steel toe chainsaw sneakers. Sneakers.
In the 70s, my mother was the one who ran the chainsaw. The leather moccasins with the chew marks on the toe are still out in the shed. No damage done, but just a friendly reminder.
My father has a boot with a similar story! ;lol

After having felled 20+ cedars with some Hawthorne and Locust lately I've been spending some time loading branches into an auto-feed chipper. I won't do it anymore without the helmet and face screen. It's saved me numerous times as the auto feeder grabs something and flails it around. I can take the body blows but the head/face shots are nasty, especially when thorns are involved.
I think I'd rather get flailed with a locust than a cedar of the same size. Locust may have thorns but those little cedar branches are rock hard and pointy.
 
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