Jotul 550 Rockland Comments

JDCrae

New Member
Nov 21, 2019
7
Baltmore, MD
I am going to have to look in there again. I thought someone had said in another post that the air inlet was on the back of the unit, and the air control lever on the front controlled that. We burned all weekend, so will clean it out again and see if I can't get to the bolts to take off that arched piece and see what is holding up the air inlet. We have two dogs so I am wondering if the inlets are clogged with pet hair perhaps. One of our dogs sheds mercilessly so maybe that is our issue. Assuming the baffles need to come out again? If so that sucks, they are a pain to get out for sure.
 

jatoxico

Minister of Fire
Aug 8, 2011
4,309
Long Island NY
We burned all weekend, so will clean it out again and see if I can't get to the bolts to take off that arched piece and see what is holding up the air inlet.
You should be able to check without taking it apart. If you look at the parts diagram the air control slider is part #71 (see the control nub?) which fits or rides on #33. The air enters behind the valance part #69 which allows air in all along its bottom edge. With a can of computer duster you should be able to blow through the air inlet on the bottom of the valance an feel the flow with door open. Slide the control back and forth while blowing air and that should clear it. Could also use vacuum with crevice tool attachment to suck anything out. Still, I can't see that getting clogged.
 

dtrykow

Member
Jan 11, 2010
26
Central CT
As I stated somewhere on this site this is my Second season running the 550. Heats well. Blower noise is so so but I knew all about those with my last insert. Anyway regarding outside stove and brick temps. The 550 runs comfortably at 550-600. Surround temps are 300-350. Brick above is 160-170. (Seems high to me). Stove or the fireplace box are not insulated. Installers packed the block off plate well with Roxul. Is insulating the outside of the stove going to reduce the brick temp or the fireplace cavity temps keeping the heat in the stove? I know the brick heat is helping to heat the house as well. Am I overthinking this? Thanks, Dave T.
 

EJL923

Minister of Fire
Oct 29, 2009
585
Western Mass
As I stated somewhere on this site this is my Second season running the 550. Heats well. Blower noise is so so but I knew all about those with my last insert. Anyway regarding outside stove and brick temps. The 550 runs comfortably at 550-600. Surround temps are 300-350. Brick above is 160-170. (Seems high to me). Stove or the fireplace box are not insulated. Installers packed the block off plate well with Roxul. Is insulating the outside of the stove going to reduce the brick temp or the fireplace cavity temps keeping the heat in the stove? I know the brick heat is helping to heat the house as well. Am I overthinking this? Thanks, Dave T.
I wouldnt insulate the stove, i have thought about that a lot and always come to the same conclusion, not a good idea. The majority of the people with 550's have stoves that run much warmer than other stove types. Insulating will only make the worse, and will probably result in overfiring your stove,
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
85,996
South Puget Sound, WA
I
Is insulating the outside of the stove going to reduce the brick temp or the fireplace cavity temps keeping the heat in the stove? I know the brick heat is helping to heat the house as well. Am I overthinking this?
Is this an exterior or interior chimney installation? If exterior, putting some insulation behind the insert (if there is room) can help reduce heat loss to outside. Not needed above the insert.
 

dtrykow

Member
Jan 11, 2010
26
Central CT
Good Morning. Exterior chimney. So the 170 degree brick not a big deal. I can see your overfiring point. The 550 seems to run-a-way on its own and most times cutting the draft down will increase the temp. Dave T.
 

djc550

Member
Nov 3, 2018
23
NJ
Hi All, Reaching out for your insight on Rockland 550 burn time and overheating.

Background
- I have the Rockland 550 five year now
- Serviced yearly by the agent where I purchased it
- I run it 24/7 from November to March.
- The door gasket was replaced last year.
- I burn approx. six cords per year.

This years wood
- I am burning Oak which is split and seasoning, top covered, since April. Moisture reading, 10-11 outside, 15-17 inside when I split three logs.
- With the fire fully loaded, I can see some moisture coming out of the wood.

Problem
This year, I noticed the flames are high even when the damper is fully closed. And, there was a red ring at the top of the insert around the flue.
To check if the fire is getting too much air, I did a flame test, and no air is being pulled into the fire through the door. However, I did notice that even with the damper closed, the flame was being drawn into the damper when I tested the airflow across the top of the door.

I am attaching two videos of the flame, (image 0252 and 0253, 45 minutes later)


Thank you all for your help!

 
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Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,436
Southeast CT
I agree that the flame is raging too much there. More air probably getting in stove than was designed for. Even though you recently replaced the door gasket, I would try the “dollar bill test“. If you’re not familiar with what that is, it can be done very quickly by taking a dollar bill when stove is off or at a minimum not too warm and putting it in the door frame and closing door on it so that it’s wedged between the door gasket and stove body. if the dollar bill is rather easily removed with door closed and latched on it, then that may likely be the source of your flames being higher.
You mentioned a red ring being around the area of the stove collar. If what you’re saying is that the stove collar area is glowing then that would be another strong indication that the stove is running too hot.
The jotul rockland has been said by many to be a hot running stove, but this should not include glowing being seen on outside of stove and flames that appear to be bordering on what could be called a “runaway fire”.
I would think that it’s normal that some of the flame test involves getting flame sucked into the air inlet that you described. Even though the air control May be in the “fully closed” position, the stove is designed to allow in some air
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
85,996
South Puget Sound, WA
Was the new door gasket from Jotul or a generic replacement? All door gaskets are not equal. There can be a substantial difference in design. Density, in particular, varies from one brand to another.
 

djc550

Member
Nov 3, 2018
23
NJ
Was the new door gasket from Jotul or a generic replacement? All door gaskets are not equal. There can be a substantial difference in design. Density, in particular, varies from one brand to another.
not sure as it was replaced by the dealer where I bought it
 

djc550

Member
Nov 3, 2018
23
NJ
I agree that the flame is raging too much there. More air probably getting in stove than was designed for. Even though you recently replaced the door gasket, I would try the “dollar bill test“. If you’re not familiar with what that is, it can be done very quickly by taking a dollar bill when stove is off or at a minimum not too warm and putting it in the door frame and closing door on it so that it’s wedged between the door gasket and stove body. if the dollar bill is rather easily removed with door closed and latched on it, then that may likely be the source of your flames being higher.
You mentioned a red ring being around the area of the stove collar. If what you’re saying is that the stove collar area is glowing then that would be another strong indication that the stove is running too hot.
The jotul rockland has been said by many to be a hot running stove, but this should not include glowing being seen on outside of stove and flames that appear to be bordering on what could be called a “runaway fire”.
I would think that it’s normal that some of the flame test involves getting flame sucked into the air inlet that you described. Even though the air control May be in the “fully closed” position, the stove is designed to allow in some air
Thank you ~ I will try the dollar test. It’s different to the lighter flame test.
I started the fire today, and again it running away. . With the damper closed, the sound of air flowing is like the sound of wind howling on a stormy day.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
85,996
South Puget Sound, WA
The splits appear to be on the smaller side and it's nice and dry. Try closing down the air much sooner with the next fire. That will slow down the wood's outgassing.
When checking the gasket for seal, also do a visual check of the entire gasket. How does the air control feel, normal?
 

moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,559
Iowa
- The door gasket was replaced last year.
When? During the burn season or after? Did you have successful/controlled burns with the new gasket installed?

Has the glass gasket been checked and or changed? Your extra air is coming from somewhere.

If you can't verify that the original door gasket was properly replaced with original factory gasket I would be inclined to start with that.
 
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djc550

Member
Nov 3, 2018
23
NJ
When? During the burn season or after? Did you have successful/controlled burns with the new gasket installed?

Has the glass gasket been checked and or changed? Your extra air is coming from somewhere.

If you can't verify that the original door gasket was properly replaced with original factory gasket I would be inclined to start with that.
The door gasket was replaced before last years burn season. The glass gasket was replaced two years ago.
How does the air get into the fire via the damper? is there any fear it is damaged, doubtful as it opens and closes with ease.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
85,996
South Puget Sound, WA
The door gasket was replaced before last years burn season. The glass gasket was replaced two years ago.
How does the air get into the fire via the damper? is there any fear it is damaged, doubtful as it opens and closes with ease.
Can we assume that the fire burned normally all last year after the gasket replacement?

If the air damper felt loose or sloppy or worked too easily it would be suspect.

The splits look to be in the 3-4" thick range. Just a guess, but I would try thicker splits, packing the existing splits tighter, closing down the air more aggressively at the beginning of the fire.
 

djc550

Member
Nov 3, 2018
23
NJ
Can we assume that the fire burned normally all last year after the gasket replacement?

If the air damper felt loose or sloppy or worked too easily it would be suspect.

The splits look to be in the 3-4" thick range. Just a guess, but I would try thicker splits, packing the existing splits tighter, closing down the air more aggressively at the beginning of the fire.
1. overall. I would say yes.
2. how do I go about checking the damper?
3. I try to split the logs split 4-6”, and found I get a better pack loading back to front instead of left to right. It also prevents the wood falling up against the glass.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
85,996
South Puget Sound, WA
Good question on the air control. I have not worked on one of these inserts to be able to tell you. On the freestanding stoves Jotul uses a slider valve, but I am not sure what is use on the C550. It would take some investigation to see what the air control handle is connected to. The odds are this is not the issue.
We also load N/S, though it does lead to a more vigorous burn because the air can flow easily between and down the length of the splits. I counter this by packing tightly and turning down the air control asap. When the stove is loaded E/W the front splits act as an air dam, slowing down the initial burn somewhat. I give examples of this in the fire starting thread up in the stickies section. Turning down the air quickly reduces and slows down the wood gas bloom that fires off the secondaries. With a top down start this can be done fairly early in the burn, before the bottom row has burned very much.
 
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moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,559
Iowa
1. overall. I would say yes.
2. how do I go about checking the damper?
3. I try to split the logs split 4-6”, and found I get a better pack loading back to front instead of left to right. It also prevents the wood falling up against the glass.
Soooo. After operating this stove for 5 years successfully, and now burning Oak that is excreting moisture during the burn, you are now having problems controlling the burn? Rather odd!

I hate to ask this but... Are you sliding the primary air control completely to the left in a attempt to slow the burn?
 

Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,436
Southeast CT
The Rockland uses a slider valve. I agree that unless the slider is moving in a different way than usual, that could be it . Probably not that. To the OP, you can’t really see the air inlet on front top right of stove face. All you see is the little nub that you move to control the air- that nub is connected to the slider itself ( this action is hidden by the cast decorative plate thing that runs along top face of stove. This placate is removable going through inside of firebox. I would not go there yet though.
How did the dollar bill test go?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
85,996
South Puget Sound, WA
Thanks CTW. Is there boost air also for the fire with the C550?
 

Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,436
Southeast CT
Thanks CTW. Is there boost air also for the fire with the C550?
Yes, it enters into the front bottom of firebox. It looks like a small rectangle protrusion in the otherwise smooth front bottom part of firebox. I actually have a fire going in my 550 as we speak. I just took a picture of where the boost air comes in. I’m pointing to it with the poker. 27744110-6AEC-42F0-A205-034E5DD78168.jpeg
 
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djc550

Member
Nov 3, 2018
23
NJ
The Rockland uses a slider valve. I agree that unless the slider is moving in a different way than usual, that could be it . Probably not that. To the OP, you can’t really see the air inlet on front top right of stove face. All you see is the little nub that you move to control the air- that nub is connected to the slider itself ( this action is hidden by the cast decorative plate thing that runs along top face of stove. This placate is removable going through inside of firebox. I would not go there yet though.
How did the dollar bill test go?
Before lighting the fire this evening I cut newspaper to the width of a dollar bill. Across the bottom and by the door hinges, I was not able to pull it out. However, with some effort, I was able to pull it out across the top and by the door handle.
I tried recording the wind sound I spoke of earlier. See attached where the damper is closed and I open it. I hope you can hear it.
 
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djc550

Member
Nov 3, 2018
23
NJ
Soooo. After operating this stove for 5 years successfully, and now burning Oak that is excreting moisture during the burn, you are now having problems controlling the burn? Rather odd!

I hate to ask this but... Are you sliding the primary air control completely to the left in a attempt to slow the burn?
Yes, once a small flame starts.
 

Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,436
Southeast CT
I could hear the whirling sound in your video. I’m not sure what that is, so I don’t want to speculate on the fix for it.
About your dollar bill test, I would get a metal straight edge and lay it across stove face to make sure that stove face has no warps in it. This is probably not the case for you but a good thing to rule out anyway.
 

djc550

Member
Nov 3, 2018
23
NJ
I could hear the whirling sound in your video. I’m not sure what that is, so I don’t want to speculate on the fix for it.
About your dollar bill test, I would get a metal straight edge and lay it across stove face to make sure that stove face has no warps in it. This is probably not the case for you but a good thing to rule out anyway.
I’ll check & report. Thank you all
stay warm & safe