Drying in 4-row stacks

FIDLER

Member
Jan 5, 2014
8
Pennsylvania
It was a lot of huge trees. [emoji3] This is the same property from which I took a 60” diameter downed white oak after Sandy. There were a lot of trees in the 24”+ range, this time.

A ship builder took the white oak, gave us about $5k for the privilege to harvest what blew down. He sent in a logging company, who took a full six days to load up what he was taking. Another church member and I split half the hickory, spending about two days per week there all summer, and the rest just got piled up for another day.
That’s dedication, my friend. I have a bunch of rounds on my driveway waiting to be split. I picked up a couple of cords of beech in Narberth this weekend, if you know where that is. I never realized how much work and time go into transporting, processing, stacking AND seasoning a cord of wood until I did it myself. Holy crap, a 60” oak.. a 1” slab would weigh around 100lbs. How did you even budge that thing? A crane? That’s a lot of wood to move around!
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,404
Philadelphia
Yes, I know Narberth well, used to have family there. The 60” rounds were all hollow, unfortunately. All the solid stuff was 49” and smaller. A friend moved it with an excavator that has a thumb, into a dump truck, that dumped it in my yard.
 
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mar13

Member
Nov 5, 2018
247
Humboldt coast, California
Land is actually reasonably flat, but there is one low spot at the end of the row. I may do a little leveling of the dirt in that area, before bringing in gravel.

In any case, here's the shed concept. Haven't added any cross-bracing to the model yet, will get to that tomorrow. Will be building one prototype to make final adjustments, then at least a half dozen of these. Footprint is 16' x 6', with 14.5' x 6' of that usable for wood. Roof is 16' x 7' 2", for 7" - 9" overhang all-around.

View attachment 247625
I saw pictures of one of your sheds filled with wood .... after several weekends of rain (https://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/good-day-to-hunker-in.180167/#post-2421724) .

Was the overhang enough to keep the wood dry? Overall, what would you do differently? What do you like best so far?

I'm still thinking of shed plans....
 
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Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
11,757
Southern IN
Was the overhang enough to keep the wood dry? Overall, what would you do differently? What do you like best so far?
I'm still thinking of shed plans....
Yeah, doesn't look like a lot of overhang, but it's no biggie if the ends get wet once in a while. You could even stack it with the outside rows' splits tilting out slightly to shed water.
I'm thinking of a shed too...it'll be nice. At least I was able to score a bunch of metal roofing, so that's an improvement over the mats I'm using, which wanna sag and fall down between the rows. :rolleyes:
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,404
Philadelphia
I’m stacking 6 ft wide, as four rows of 18” splits, so there’s only so much overhang I can get with two 4’ wide sheets of plywood , without getting into a ton of cutting and waste of sheathing. Also, more overhang means more chance of bumping and destroying it as I try to turn my too-big tractor around in the wood splitting area. With drip edge and 1/4” shingle overhang, the total overhang is almost exactly 12 inches, on these units.

So, I think I found the best compromise for me, I honestly can’t think of anything Iwould change. I have built two so far, with more in the way, as soon as I finish a few other projects.
The wood stays dry in most rain conditions, just not when it gets real windy. But I’m not sure if a few more inches of overhang would change that.
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
10,351
Nova Scotia
But I’m not sure if a few more inches of overhang would change that.
Not likely. Orienting so prevailing winds are down its length rather into the sides of the stacks might help though.
 
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JRHAWK9

Minister of Fire
Jan 8, 2014
1,337
Wisconsin Dells, WI
Jealous of all you guys who have areas of full sun and wind. I have the wood but just no good areas for it to get sun and wind. I'm pretty much stacking top covered in the middle of the woods. :(
 

mar13

Member
Nov 5, 2018
247
Humboldt coast, California
I’m stacking 6 ft wide, as four rows of 18” splits, so there’s only so much overhang I can get with two 4’ wide sheets of plywood , without getting into a ton of cutting and waste of sheathing. Also, more overhang means more chance of bumping and destroying it as I try to turn my too-big tractor around in the wood splitting area. With drip edge and 1/4” shingle overhang, the total overhang is almost exactly 12 inches, on these units.

So, I think I found the best compromise for me, I honestly can’t think of anything Iwould change. I have built two so far, with more in the way, as soon as I finish a few other projects.
The wood stays dry in most rain conditions, just not when it gets real windy. But I’m not sure if a few more inches of overhang would change that.
I'm happy to read that you are so satisfied with your shed design. Would you be generous enough to share the details/draft of your design?I'd have to modify it so it that meets my city's 120 square foot limitations. (Correction, I see your design is 16'x6' =96 sq ft foot print) Also, what carpentry skill level would you judge is required for your design?

I know you had the requirement for the shed to be portable shed, but nevertheless - and there are advantages to not permanently being stuck with the originally decided on location - but would have you otherwise worked with posts attached-to/stuck-in the ground otherwise?

Thanks.
 

mar13

Member
Nov 5, 2018
247
Humboldt coast, California
I just did some quick (hopefully correct) calculations on your shed. I'm assuming stacks are 5ft high, 15 feet usable space long, and 4 pieces of wood wide: With wood cut to 16" it comes to 3.125 cords. With 15" (sometimes sold around here) it's 2.93 cords. One place is even selling wood at 14", which would allow 5 across (no pallet in between) giving 3.4 cords.

Regardless, 16", 15", or 14", they'd all just about meet my desire for a 3 cord shed.

No tractor, however, so it'd have to built in place or have a lot of good friends to help shove it.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
11,757
Southern IN
I just did some quick (hopefully correct) calculations on your shed. I'm assuming stacks are 5ft high,
You can go higher than that..
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,404
Philadelphia
Hey mar,

yes, I can dig up the plans I have. I think I did a 3D model, but never bothered snapping any dimensions on it, since I designed it to use all standard 8 ft and 16 ft pieces, with nearly zero cutting or waste. The only thing on this entire design that might be a little beyond the average homeowner with a miter saw would be the way I notched the rafters, but you could simply use steel ties to avoid that (albeit with more cost).

Excluding those rafter notch cuts, the only tools I used were a miter saw for cutting the rafters and vertical studs to length, framing nailer, a roofing nailer, a utility knife for trimming shingles, a hand saw for flush cutting the diagonal cross braces, and some long bar clamps for drawing stubborn pressure treated lumber into square, as it’s often a little twisted. You could easily substitute a hammer and elbow grease for the roofing nailer, and an impact driver with 3” deck screws for the framing nailer, if you don’t have those.

I just so happen to have a freshly built empty one in my back yard now, and will be dry stacking and leveling block for its foundation piers today. I will get some photos for you, and can check my CAD stations next week to see what plans I may have saved.

I cut to 18”, and can stack the four onboard rows to 7’-4” h x 7’-1” w, and the four outboard rows to 7’ h x 7’-1” w. So that should be 312 + 298 cu.ft. = 4.76 cord per rack. Adjust as necessary for your lengths.
 
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mar13

Member
Nov 5, 2018
247
Humboldt coast, California
Hey mar,

yes, I can dig up the plans I have. I think I did a 3D model, but never bothered snapping any dimensions on it, since I designed it to use all standard 8 ft and 16 ft pieces, with nearly zero cutting or waste. The only thing on this entire design that might be a little beyond the average homeowner with a miter saw would be the way I notched the rafters, but you could simply use steel ties to avoid that (albeit with more cost).

Excluding those rafter notch cuts, the only tools I used were a miter saw for cutting the rafters and vertical studs to length, framing nailer, a roofing nailer, a utility knife for trimming shingles, a hand saw for flush cutting the diagonal cross braces, and some long bar clamps for drawing stubborn pressure treated lumber into square, as it’s often a little twisted. You could easily substitute a hammer and elbow grease for the roofing nailer, and an impact driver with 3” deck screws for the framing nailer, if you don’t have those.

I just so happen to have a freshly built empty one in my back yard now, and will be dry stacking and leveling block for its foundation piers today. I will get some photos for you, and can check my CAD stations next week to see what plans I may have saved.

I cut to 18”, and can stack the four onboard rows to 7’-4” h x 7’-1” w, and the four outboard rows to 7’ h x 7’-1” w. So that should be 312 + 298 cu.ft. = 4.76 cord per rack. Adjust as necessary for your lengths.
Thanks! As I've read, every project deserves a new tool. During my swim and walk home yesterday, I was mentally going through your design and realized how your dimensions fit nicely into standard board lengths. Summer isn't far off, so maybe I can actually commit to finally liberating myself from my elaborate tarping system.

Clarification: swimming was not part of my commute home, although we definitely could use the rain.
 
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